Callsign
ad: Nifty
Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 68

Thread: 2 Meter SSB radios

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Jacuzzi
    Posts
    9,660

    Default

    W5UN has a nice setup. Guess he has a homepage where you can see his massive VHF antenna setup.

    http://www.qrz.com/detail/W5UN
    73 de Charles - KC8VWM
    North American QRP CW Club #3159, SKCC# 5752

  2. #22

    Post

    I am not having problems trying to find a cheap 2 meter rig that does SSB. Any ideas ?
    I will assume that you are having problems finding a All-Mode 2-meter transceiver. There have been hundreds of used models sold on QTH, QRZ and eBay in the last 12 months.

    A majority of these single band all-mode radios were mfg. and sold in mid-1970s to early 1990s by Kewnood, Icom and Yaesu. The Icom x75 series for 6m, 2m, 222 MHz and 70 cm being pinacle of this design approach.

    For a good working radio, you should expect to pay at least ~ $200.
    You will find cheaper -- and you should expect to have these radios serviced or
    repaired by a competent service person with parts (of this era) for enjoyable usage (daily driver).

    For example, last year at the Fox River hamfest I picked up an Icom IC-211, with bad finals and assorted issues -- as reported by owner. I had Scott Malcom replace the bad finals, align and change out a bad crystal (off freq) --- he had the parts readily available. I had Scott do this work, since he had significantly more bench time with this model (when he worked at Icom Service) and some of its early issues (which were previously addressed in this specific radio).

    I added external ComSpec CTCSS encoder, found a MB-5 mobile mount and repaired the microphone cord.

    So, I spent abit more than $100 to have the radio usable on FM repeaters and received a detailed report from Scott on radio and repairs (version PC boards inside the radio, etc.).

    The Kenwood TS-700 was another popular all-mode 2-meter model and had 10 watts output -- common RF output for many 2-meter/VHF radios in 1970s.

    w9gb
    Last edited by W9GB; 08-09-2009 at 09:16 PM.

  3. #23

    Default

    Ok so it looks like antennas have been covered as well as ego boosts from the Big antenna guys, but aside all that, what radios are available?

    I have been playing around as well and am wanting to find a decent 100W all mode V/UHF rig. I dont use and wont use etheft (ebay), and prefer to be able to see and touch it before purchase.

    I would really like to find a new rig but what are the chances!

  4. #24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KF6NFW View Post
    Ok so it looks like antennas have been covered as well as ego boosts from the Big antenna guys, but aside all that, what radios are available?

    I have been playing around as well and am wanting to find a decent 100W all mode V/UHF rig. I dont use and wont use etheft (ebay), and prefer to be able to see and touch it before purchase.

    I would really like to find a new rig but what are the chances!
    ::A 100W VHF+UHF multi-mode (SSB capable) transceiver, used and working, should cost at least $600. It would be rare to find anything below that, and I can't recall ever seeing one below that. OTOH, a used IC-706MK2G is about $500-$600 in fine condition and runs 100W PEP on 2m and 50W PEP on 70cm; you can ignore its HF capabilities and consider them "free."

    One reason the VHF-UHF multimodes cost so much compared with an "HF + VHF" mobile rig is the manufacturers included a lot of costly capabilities in them, such as crossband (satellite) capability with Doppler satellite tracking. It's a also a more limited market, so not as many rigs were made for it.

    A low powered VHF/UHF multimode rig that's much older can be found for less: Stuff like the FT-726R. The little FT290/490 rigs which are also low powered and not fully featured can also be found for a lot less; these are "single band" units that can be used portable with battery power also. Some 10W PEP single band mobile rigs are also quite functional albeit lower powered and pretty old.

    I have an FT-736R which runs four VHF/UHF bands; mine is set up for 50, 144, 222 and 432 MHz and runs 25W output on 2m/70cm/135cm and 10W output on 6m and it's a very full-featured rig that will run crossband duplex for satellite work. It's a good rig, but I've never seen a working one sell for less than about $600-$700, and that's with just two bands. Add two more bands and they're usually in the $900-$1000 range.

    WB2WIK/6

  5. #25

    Default

    I don't think there ever was a 100W multimode 2m only rig. 2m only multimodes died out in the 1980s, and I think the highest power was 25W such as the FT-225. Then the trend was to multi-band multimodes like the FT-726. I think the nearest you'll come to what you're asking for in a new radio is the IC-910 which is a dual band 2m/70cm rig. But the Kenwood TS-2000 is arguably better value which gives 100W on HF, 6m and 2m, and 50W on 70cm. It probably has better performance than the 2m-only multimodes that were available 25 years ago.

    For optimum performance most VHF/UHF enthusiasts nowadays would choose a high end HF transceiver such as the Elecraft K3 plus transverters from Kuhne Electronics in Germany or Down East Microwave in the USA, with legal-limit amplifiers and masthead preamps. So single band VHF multimodes are just not something there is much of a demand for these days.
    Julian, G4ILO
    [url=http://www.g4ilo.com/]G4ILO's Shack[/url] [url=http://www.g4ilo.com/blog.html]G4ILO's Blog[/url] [url=http://www.ham-directory.com/]Ham Directory[/url] [url=http://www.wota.org.uk/]Wainwrights On The Air[/url]

  6. #26

    Post

    I don't think there ever was a 100W multimode 2m only rig. 2m only multimodes died out in the 1980s, and I think the highest power was 25W such as the FT-225. Then the trend was to multi-band multimodes like the FT-726. I think the nearest you'll come to what you're asking for in a new radio is the IC-910 which is a dual band 2m/70cm rig.
    Actually the Icom IC-820 and IC-821 are good 2m/70cm choices, but not at 100 watts.
    http://www.universal-radio.com/catal...ulti/2558.html
    IF you desire satellite work -- then the IC-821 is preferred of the two,
    since it addressed many early satellite usage issues with IC-820.
    One listed on QRZ for sale (cosmetic fair condition) at $550 plus shipping
    http://www.firelandsradios.com/icom821h.jpg
    Single band VHF multimodes are just not something there is much of a demand for these days.
    Maybe in Europe. I see 2-meter all-mode radio usage as common IF (rather than 28 MHz) for high band trasnverters.

    w9gb
    Last edited by W9GB; 08-09-2009 at 09:25 PM.

  7. #27

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by G4ILO View Post
    I don't think there ever was a 100W multimode 2m only rig.
    Sure there was, and I had one: The Icom IC-275H. Actually its predecessor the old IC-271H ran 100W on 2m (only) also.

    2m only multimodes died out in the 1980s, and I think the highest power was 25W such as the FT-225.
    Nah, see above. Maybe the 100W Icom units weren't sold in EU, but here in the States they were quite popular. I bought my brand-new IC-275H (100W 2m rig) in 1988.

    Then the trend was to multi-band multimodes like the FT-726.
    Actually, the FT-726 pre-dated the 100W 2m rigs and was from the 70s. The FT-736R which runs 25W on 2m/70cm and can contain four band modules for any four bands from 50 through 1296 MHz came out in 1987 and sold "new" until only 5-6 years ago.

    I think the nearest you'll come to what you're asking for in a new radio is the IC-910 which is a dual band 2m/70cm rig. But the Kenwood TS-2000 is arguably better value which gives 100W on HF, 6m and 2m, and 50W on 70cm. It probably has better performance than the 2m-only multimodes that were available 25 years ago.
    Yes, I agree. The TS-2000 "on sale" as it is now is a pretty good deal and I'll bet it does outperform most of the older stuff.

    For optimum performance most VHF/UHF enthusiasts nowadays would choose a high end HF transceiver such as the Elecraft K3 plus transverters from Kuhne Electronics in Germany or Down East Microwave in the USA, with legal-limit amplifiers and masthead preamps. So single band VHF multimodes are just not something there is much of a demand for these days.
    I agree with that, too. Even an older 10m rig can make a great baseband IF subsystem for a good VHF-UHF-SHF transverter (DEM makes them from 6m through 3cm!). One of my all-time favorites for this is the Kenwood TS-830S: It has every feature needed for very effective weak signal VHF operation, is "all set up" for transverters without any modifications required, and is available pretty inexpensively. Using a TS-830S or a brand new K3, in terms of on-the-air VHF-UHF performance, I don't think anyone would be able to tell the difference in any way.

    WB2WIK/6

  8. #28

    Default

    My memory gets less reliable the further back I go. I'd completely forgotten about those Icom radios.

    I like the Kenwood 820/830 as well. I think the modern K3 receiver would have higher dynamic range which would handle better the massive signals you can get if you happen to be line of sight with someone running full power in a contest. But perhaps that's less of a problem in the US as you have more space to spread out in.
    Julian, G4ILO
    [url=http://www.g4ilo.com/]G4ILO's Shack[/url] [url=http://www.g4ilo.com/blog.html]G4ILO's Blog[/url] [url=http://www.ham-directory.com/]Ham Directory[/url] [url=http://www.wota.org.uk/]Wainwrights On The Air[/url]

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    New Castle County, Delaware
    Posts
    6,993

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WB2WIK View Post
    OTOH, a used IC-706MK2G is about $500-$600 in fine condition and runs 100W PEP on 2m and 50W PEP on 70cm; you can ignore its HF capabilities and consider them "free."
    You'd better look again, Steve.

    I had a 706MKiiG for 8 years. It never did 100w on 2m, nor did it do 50w on 70cm. Icom's own brochure clearly states 50w on 2m and 20w on 70cm.

    A TS-2000 will do what you said, but not a 706.
    "If someone tells you he believes in and talks to an invisible bunny named Harvey, you put him on medication and a regimen of therapy. If someone tells you he believes in and talks to God, well, that's perfectly acceptable. Why that's the case is impossible for me to fathom." - WP2XX

    "He's dead, Jim. You take his Tricorder and I'll get his wallet."

    "The problem with America is stupidity. I'm not saying there should be a capital punishment for stupidity, but why don't we just take the safety labels off of everything and let the problem solve itself?"

  10. #30

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by G4ILO View Post
    My memory gets less reliable the further back I go. I'd completely forgotten about those Icom radios.

    I like the Kenwood 820/830 as well. I think the modern K3 receiver would have higher dynamic range which would handle better the massive signals you can get if you happen to be line of sight with someone running full power in a contest. But perhaps that's less of a problem in the US as you have more space to spread out in.
    We have space to spread out but "local" activity can always be extremely strong; however I've always had very sharp antennas (long boom Yagis) that can take a 40/S9 signal right down to S2 if I swing just 20-25 degrees away, so this has never been much of a problem. The odds of having a station so close by that they'd bother me, and having my beam aimed at them, and them having their beam aimed at me, all at the same time are about one in a thousand -- it just very rarely happens.

    WB2WIK/6

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •