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Thread: David Clark Headsets for Ham Shack Use?

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Overland, MO
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    3

    Default David Clark Headsets for Ham Shack Use?

    Hi folks,

    I have several (cheap) headsets in the shack, but I've always been fascinated by the David Clark headsets worn by aircraft pilots. Several years ago I took a helicopter flight, and was impressed by the comfort and sound quality of the David Clark headset.

    Have any of you used these headsets for ham radio use? I used to work a lot of DX in really poor conditions, and I've found that a lot of headsets which seem OK for a few minutes become really uncomfortable after being worn for a half-hour or more. The David Clark headsets must have something going for them if pilots can stand to wear them for hours on end!

    I went looking for information, and found that there are a gazillion different models. I assume that there are differences in earphone and microphone impedances, power requirements, connector (plug) arrangements, etc.

    Right now, I just don't know enough about what I'm doing to go out and buy a headset on EB@Y. With my luck, I'd get a 2000 ohm headset with a carbon mike that required 28VDC to operate instead of an 8 ohm headset with a dynamic mike! The ones I've seen listed are WAY too expensive to buy something that I can't use.

    Please pass along any experiences, tips, suggestions, or caveats to guide me in my quest.

    Thanks es 73,
    Mike, WB0LDJ
    mharmon at att dot net

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Daytona Beach, Florida
    Posts
    83

    Default Aviation headsets for HAM use

    I have a pair of Lightspeed 25XL and DX 4 and 5 headsets i use on my HAM Radios with no problems, i also use them with the headsert adapter on my Icom T90 HT in the Aircraft. Sound quality is excellent especially with the Lightspeeds, they are ANR (Automatic Noise Reduction).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    3763 Lyle Avenue, North Pole, AK 99705
    Posts
    22,879

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WB0LDJ View Post
    Hi folks,

    I have several (cheap) headsets in the shack, but I've always been fascinated by the David Clark headsets worn by aircraft pilots. Several years ago I took a helicopter flight, and was impressed by the comfort and sound quality of the David Clark headset.

    Have any of you used these headsets for ham radio use? I used to work a lot of DX in really poor conditions, and I've found that a lot of headsets which seem OK for a few minutes become really uncomfortable after being worn for a half-hour or more. The David Clark headsets must have something going for them if pilots can stand to wear them for hours on end!

    I went looking for information, and found that there are a gazillion different models. I assume that there are differences in earphone and microphone impedances, power requirements, connector (plug) arrangements, etc.

    Right now, I just don't know enough about what I'm doing to go out and buy a headset on EB@Y. With my luck, I'd get a 2000 ohm headset with a carbon mike that required 28VDC to operate instead of an 8 ohm headset with a dynamic mike! The ones I've seen listed are WAY too expensive to buy something that I can't use.

    Please pass along any experiences, tips, suggestions, or caveats to guide me in my quest.

    Thanks es 73,
    Mike, WB0LDJ
    mharmon at att dot net
    \

    David Clarke "skullcrushers" are fine for amateur radio. They do tend to be a bit "deaf" though...if you're used to high sensitivity earbuds and such. They are designed for line level telco standards, about -13 dbm....which is pretty hot by modern standards. Just so you know.


    Eric
    "The more you know, the less you don't know."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Stranded in Iowa, Field of Beams
    Posts
    317

    Default

    There are many different model of David Clark headphones. Mono, Stereo, Volume control, microphone, plug style, head-strap style...

    I bought my DC H10-C on eBay for around $45. The are the ultra-plain-jane model. Mono headphones w/ normal 1/4" jack, no volume control, no microphone. I love them. Excellent audio response for voice communication, and excellent at muffling ambient noise like computer fans, the XYLs vacuum cleaner, and screaming children.

    I did find this for you.... schematic for one of the fully loaded models.


    [LEFT][FONT=Tahoma][COLOR=black]"Ham Radio does not abide by the [B][COLOR=darkgreen]'Right Tool for the Job'[/COLOR][/B] rule. Quite the contrary.[/COLOR][/FONT][/LEFT]
    [LEFT][FONT=Tahoma][COLOR=black]It often gets the job done with things you wouldnt normally recognize as tools."[/COLOR][/FONT][/LEFT]

  5. #5

    Default

    http://www.n2clb.com/how_to_convert_..._clark_hea.htm

    Found this while searching on the same subject.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Loveland, Colorado
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    1,070

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KL7AJ View Post
    \

    David Clarke "skullcrushers" are fine for amateur radio. They do tend to be a bit "deaf" though...if you're used to high sensitivity earbuds and such. They are designed for line level telco standards, about -13 dbm....which is pretty hot by modern standards. Just so you know.


    Eric
    I have a couple pairs, and they really cut the aircraft noise, but I would call them skullcrushers myself. Part of cutting the noise, is that they are a tight fit. Not very comfortable to me, but for ham use, you could probably bend the headband outward to make them more comfortable at the expense of noise reduction.

    I'm not sure how well the mic will work, as they are not wideband, and while good for DX, wouldn't be best for ragchewing. They do have a distinctive sound, and work good for AM airband.

    I have spent way too many hours in aircraft with those things crunching my skull, to ever consider them for ham use. The best part of landing, is knowing I will get those damn things off my head soon.

    The Heil headset, on the other hand is real comfortable.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by W0GI View Post
    I have a couple pairs, and they really cut the aircraft noise, but I would call them skullcrushers myself. Part of cutting the noise, is that they are a tight fit. Not very comfortable to me, but for ham use, you could probably bend the headband outward to make them more comfortable at the expense of noise reduction.

    I'm not sure how well the mic will work, as they are not wideband, and while good for DX, wouldn't be best for ragchewing. They do have a distinctive sound, and work good for AM airband.

    I have spent way too many hours in aircraft with those things crunching my skull, to ever consider them for ham use. The best part of landing, is knowing I will get those damn things off my head soon.

    The Heil headset, on the other hand is real comfortable.
    The link I found above states that you have to replace the mic element due to impedance. Not sure if that's the wideband issue you are talking about?

    As far as my radio, I think I can build a project box adapter with PTT that will plug directly into the modular mic input. If I read the pinout correctly, the 706MKiiG has PTT, Mic Audio, and Audio Out all availabe from that modular jack. That would make a nice setup in my opinion.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Loveland, Colorado
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    1,070

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KI6LNG View Post
    The link I found above states that you have to replace the mic element due to impedance. Not sure if that's the wideband issue you are talking about?

    As far as my radio, I think I can build a project box adapter with PTT that will plug directly into the modular mic input. If I read the pinout correctly, the 706MKiiG has PTT, Mic Audio, and Audio Out all availabe from that modular jack. That would make a nice setup in my opinion.
    The mic in the picture is the round one that I see on the helicopter models. I'm not sure of the impedance on those, but the ones I have are the square mic and work fine in my Icom A20 airband HT. I actualy have an Icom adaptor with a PTT to use the DC headset on the A20. It may still be available.

    I actualy lost electrical one day going into Fullerton, and only had the HT to talk to ATC. It was real handy that day.

    There are a lot of DC models, and some of the old airband radio stuff is a bit weird compared to the ham stuff we are used to.

    The bad news is that Bob Heil doesn't sell the HC-4 and HC-5 elements anymore, so maybe the mic you have will work.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    harms way
    Posts
    13,615

    Default

    speaking of headsets

    I have been using some home stereo headphones whilst hamming and swling lately. Most are dirt cheap digital sets from walkmen and so on.

    The best fitting, lightest, don't even know they are on headphones I have, the ones with the greatest audio response and clarity, even if they are cheap no name headphones, are of course the ones that allow the audio amp/IF noise to pass right through to your ears. That audio amp/IF noise that you never even noticed before when running your usual dedicated home stereo speaker. Oh sure, you can up the volume until the amp/IF hiss is overcome but by then you're going to be deaf soon.



    Why is it that all ham rigs have to have audio amp noise?

    Good thing I have a few others to try. I have an ancient rca home stereo set from like the 70s, white plastic clunky disco looking thngs that amount to a head clamp with individual volume controls on each disco ball. They work great, just enough high end to not pass the amp/IF noise but kinda heavy.

    Maybe I can find a less noisy audio amp chip and do some hacking....

  10. #10
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    Aug 2002
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    Loveland, Colorado
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by N0SYA View Post
    Why is it that all ham rigs have to have audio amp noise?
    That's why I don't like to use a headset.

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