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Thread: First afternoon in the expanded 7.100 to 7.200 MHz 40 metre band.

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Somalia website 2: http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio
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    250

    Default First afternoon in the expanded 7.100 to 7.200 MHz 40 metre band.

    First afternoon in the expanded 7.100 to 7.200 MHz 40 metre band.

    The United Nations International Telecommunications Union date for broadcast stations to move out of the 7.100 to 7.200 MHz band of frequencies is 29 March 2009.

    This has created a worldwide amateur radio band from 7.000 to 7.200 MHz for two way ham radio communications.

    Amateur Radio operators in Somalia, Australia, New Zealand, America and some other countries can also use 7.200 to 7.300 MHz shared with broadcasting stations.

    The old 40 metre broadcast band was 7.100 to 7.350 MHz.
    As of 29 March 2009 the new 40 metre broadcast band is from 7.200 to 7.600 MHz.

    Report on the first day of operating in the newly expanded 40 metre amateur radio band during the Australian SUNSET.

    On the Australian afternoon of the 29 March 2009 UTC 0630 UTC there was 1 shortwave broadcast station in the newly expanded 40 metre amateur band from 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.

    7190 KHz (7.190 MHz) Radio Tunis in Tunisia (North Africa) was broadcasting to North and West Africa on AM with signal strength 9 in Sydney, Australia. The broadcast schedule is 0400 to 0700 UTC using 500 kW.

    Amateur radio stations from Australia, New Zealand, Europe and West Africa were heard across the dial 7.000 to 7.200 MHz. USA Amateur radio stations were heard up to 7.300 MHz.

    In Australia we have had 7.000 to 7.300 MHz for many years and it is great to hear 7.100 – 7.200 MHz so clear and full of Amateur Radio stations on the first day that it has been cleared by most short wave broadcast stations.

    7.200 to 7.300 MHz also sounds mostly clear at 0630 UTC.

    At 0740 UTC there was 1 shortwave broadcast station in the newly expanded 40 metre amateur band from 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.

    7.140 MHz Voice of Korea, Pyongyang, North Korea was over signal strength 9 broadcasting AM in Chinese to North East China.

    As a matter of interest at 0840 UTC from 7.200 to 7.300 MHz there were 4 short wave broadcasters.
    7.200 MHz station 1 music and foreign language- very strong S9.
    7.275 MHz KBS World Radio on AM in Seoul, South Korea. The broadcast schedule is 0800 to 1300 UTC, 1600 to 1900 UTC and 2200 to 2300 UTC.
    7.285 MHz Radio New Zealand in Wellington using a 100 kW DRM digital short wave radio transmitter from 0700 to 1200 UTC and 1751 to 1850 UTC. Radio New Zealand use a Short wave 100 kW AM transmitter from 1551 to 1750 UTC.
    7.295 MHz station 4 music and foreign language very strong S9.

    During Radio New Zealand DRM digital short wave radio broadcasts on 7.285 MHz Radio New Zealand is also broadcasting on AM short wave on 6.170 MHz or 9.615 MHz or 9.655 MHz.

    Report on the first day of operating in the newly expanded 40 metre amateur radio band during the Australian SUNRISE.


    A few days ago 7.100 to 7.200 MHz was full of short wave broadcast stations in the Australia morning.

    With broadcast stations moving out of the 7.100 to 7.200 MHz band only a few remain. Here is what I heard in Sydney, Australia on Sunday, 29 March 2009 GMT date (Monday 30 March 2009 Australia date).


    At 1740 UTC there were 6 short wave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.
    7110 kHz Radio Ethiopia in Addis Ababa 59
    7125 kHz s/off at 1808 UTC
    7145 kHz Radio Hargeisa in Somaliland. (East Africa)
    7165 kHz music and foreign language very strong S9.
    7170 kHz music and foreign language very strong S9.
    7180 kHz music and foreign language very strong S9.


    At 1810 UTC there were 4 shortwave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.
    7100 kHz Voice of Korea in Pyongyang, North Korea 1800 UTC. North Korea national anthem at 1902 UTC. Broadcast continued.
    7110 kHz Radio Ethiopia in the Amharic language.
    7.145 MHz Radio Hargeisa in Somaliland in the Somali language. News at 1852 UTC followed by station identification. Somaliland national anthem at 1856 UTC, Sign off at 1858 UTC.
    7175 kHz Voice of the Broad Masses of Eritrea in Asmara. Station identification at 1902 UTC followed by music. Sign off at 2000 UTC


    At 1906 UTC there were 4 short wave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.
    7.100 Voice of Korea, Pyongyang, North Korea (North East Asia).
    7.110 Radio Ethiopia, Addis Ababa (East Africa).
    7.175 Voice of Broad Masses of Eritrea (Voice of the people of Eritrea) (East Africa).
    7.190 MHz Radio Tunis in Tunisia signs on with the call to prayer at 1906 UTC (North Africa).


    At 2000 UTC there were 5 short wave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.
    7.100 Voice of Korea, Pyongyang, North Korea (North East Asia). Sign off before 2050 UTC.
    7.110 Radio Ethiopia, Addis Ababa (East Africa). Sign off at 2100 UTC
    7.135 MHz Jamming station heard presumed jamming the Voice of Iraqi Kurdistan. No jamming and no stations at 2100 UTC.
    7170 kHz China or North Korea opened with time signal and National Anthem at 2000UTC.
    7.190 MHz Radio Tunis in Tunisia.


    At 2100 UTC there were 4 short wave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz
    7.125 MHz China or North Korea at 2050 UTC.
    7170 kHz China or North Korea.
    7.180 MHz Voice of Korea, Pyongyang, North Korea (North East Asia) opened with North Korea National Anthem at 2100 UTC.
    7.190 MHz Radio Tunis in Tunisia. The broadcast schedule is 1700 to 0000 UTC using 500 kW.


    As a matter of interest at 1800 to 2000 UTC there were 2 short wave broadcast stations below 7.000 MHz.
    Radio Cairo, Egypt on 6.860 MHz (North Africa) and Israel Defence Forces Radio GLZ (Galey Zahal, IDF Radio, Israel Army Radio) on 6973 KHz in Hebrew (Middle East).

    In this time period 7.200 to 7.300 MHz is well used by short wave broadcasting stations.

    Enjoy the 40metere band.

    73,
    Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A
    Email somaliahamradio@yahoo.com
    Website https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio
    Last edited by VK2BVS; 03-30-2009 at 10:51 PM. Reason: updating information 3.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cassville, GA
    Posts
    138

    Default

    cool! see you on the air sometime!
    73 de
    Josh KI4MXO
    SKCC # 5319
    W5YI VE# 30082
    HF, VHF mobile.
    100 watts all the way

    Founder of HACC: [URL]http://forums.qrz.com/group.php?groupid=49[/URL] come on in!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Gidgegannup 40km NW Perth West Australia
    Posts
    5

    Default 40 m clear of Broadcasters?

    Glad to see 40m is clear in Sydney. It will take a bit longer, I fear, for the less compliant stations in Asia to move.

    Here in VK6 we seem to be in the footprint of the first hop from Asia on 40 metres, and stations from that area are quite strong.

    Here's hoping the band will come good for all of us soon.

    73
    Bob Bristow
    VK6POP
    Gidgegannup
    Western Australia
    OF88bd

  4. #4

    Default AM on 40m

    A reminder in surveys like this to kindly observe those of us on AM as part of the vintage radio aspect of the hobby.

    Hearing a heterodyne may NOT mean it's a leftover broadcast station.

    Thanks
    Paul, WA3VJB
    [B]Enjoying wholesome AM on shortwave hobby radio.[/B]

  5. #5

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by WA3VJB View Post
    A reminder in surveys like this to kindly observe those of us on AM as part of the vintage radio aspect of the hobby.

    Hearing a heterodyne may NOT mean it's a leftover broadcast station.

    Thanks
    xe1lpe international monitoring service of IARU_FMRE . region 2 from mexico city . tomorrow we goin to chek about 7.100-7.200. in this area in north america and central america . 73s to all estations . contac to my estation by internet . email . xe1lpe@yahoo.com.mx

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Jacuzzi
    Posts
    12,748

    Default

    I flipped the switch on the BC 348Q as I am typing this reply. Seems I am still hearing broadcasters below 7.200... Sounds like music from India or something..

    Perhaps this will take more time?

    73 de Charles - KC8VWM
    Last edited by KC8VWM; 03-30-2009 at 05:05 AM.

  7. #7

    Default

    Radio Belarus on 7135 khz is still alive this morning.

    Goran SM7DLK

  8. #8

    Default

    Here at 1400 GMT I am about to fire up on 40m to see what's going on.

    But I've checked my email box and found a friendly query from someone asking for guidance as to best practices to continue making way for AM activity among fellow radio hobbyists.

    I had posted, in this thread, the fact not all AM activity on 40 meters is that from international broadcasters, and I requested please to try to make way for us.

    I took a few minutes to reply to him, and thought I would offer the same information to others, with kind regards.

    Catch you on the radio (starting out around 7290Kc)

    VJB wrote:
    > It's very kind of you to inquire, and thank you on behalf of us running AM as part of our vintage radio pursuit.
    >
    > The reason I felt compelled to post that advisory in the first place is because of the deliberate neglect by the ARRL failing to include our part of the hobby in their publications. Without a reference to AM activity in the Operating Manual, the ARRL Handbook, licensing study materials, and the periodicals they distribute, it's up to licensees to "discover" us and this sometimes inadvertantly creates some friction.
    >
    > That said, you will be generous if you can simply recognize the sound of a carrier when your receive mode is SSB, and allowing perhaps 5kc of space to either side before you set up shop.
    >
    > The reason the 5kc rule-of-thumb is good, is that we, on AM, are using a more wholesome setting of selectivity in order to capture the bulk of the transmitted signal's audio.
    >
    > A modern transceiver, by comparison, might be pinched down to as little as 2Kc selectivity to recover the audio on an SSB signal. Personally, I believe that it is this pinched slice of radio that gives people headaches and drives them to AM where we sound more human.
    >
    > Anyway, please take this as a welcome mat to join AM conversations anytime you encounter them. You already have expressed the kind of sentiment of concern and interest that guarantees you would be brought into an AM QSO with a friendly, receptive audience.
    >
    > This YouTube video, now with nearly 16,000 downloads, might help illustrate for you what we do and how we sound:
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbYKAPkS6lM
    >
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    >
    Paul, WA3VJB
    [B]Enjoying wholesome AM on shortwave hobby radio.[/B]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    Somalia website 2: http://sites.google.com/site/somaliaamateurradio
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    Default Advanced Modulation AM on ham radio in the 21st century.

    Hello to all fellow Advanced Modulation AM users.

    Enemies of AM call us the Ancient Modulation users hi hi (radio joke).

    Others call AM Amplitude Modulation which is also used when getting technical hi hi (this hi hi is not a radio joke).

    This year in Australian amateur radio I have heard-

    AM ham radio in Sydney, Australia on 1.860 MHz at 11am (or after the WIA, our ARRL equivalent broadcast) each Sunday.

    AM amateur radio from VK2WI on 1.845 MHz (a 30 minute to 1 hour AM amateur radio news broadcast from the WIA, the Australian equivalent of the USA ARRL) each Sunday.

    AM ham radio from Melbourne, Australia on 160 metres from 11pm till way past midnight on 1.850 MHz.

    AM amateur radio from Melbourne, Australia on 80 metres around 3.680 MHz working cross band by transmitting continuously on 80 metres AM and receiving a continuous Ham radio AM station on 160 metres. Like a telephone conversation.

    AM ham radio round table cross banding between one AM ham station on 160 m, another on 80 m and a third ham station on 2m FM. This is also called an AM MF HF FM VHF QSO pronounced Ammfhffmvhfqso hi hi (Here hi hi refers to the pronunciation which is a radio joke).

    AM amateur radio contacts in the evenings after 9 pm around 3.675 MHz.

    The NSW VK2 Wireless Institute of Australia is replacing its old 80 metre band broadcast transmitter for a new one that will operate on 3.595 MHz. It has been used for years on AM until the old unit failed. The 80 m ham radio broadcast is temporarily on SSB but will return to AM as soon as possible.

    Each of the 8 Wireless Institute of Australia regions, states or territories of Australia (VK1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8) have their own broadcasts each week and several use amateur radio AM to allow Short Wave Listeners to learn about amateur radio. Wireless Institute of Australia amateur radio AM broadcasts is normally on 160, 80 and/or 40 metres.

    AM amateur radio conversations between Queensland VK4, New South Wales VK2 and Victoria VK3 ham radio stations around 7.120 MHz around midday.

    I have enjoyed an AM contact from Sydney to Adelaide on the 12 metre band on 24.980 MHz and AM ham radio from 29.0 to 29.1 MHz in the 10 m AM amateur radio band between Sydney VK2 New South Wales and Adelaide VK5 South Australia.

    I have heard a few opening to Hawaii on 28 MHz so hopefully contacts between Australia and the USA will soon be possible in the 29.0 to 29.1 MHz in the 10 m AM amateur radio band.

    For the first time I have an antenna for 10 m AM and I am looking forward to lots of nice Advanced Modulation conversations on 29 MHz.

    In previous years I have heard a worldwide AM network of ham radio stations on 14.286 MHz in the 20 metre band and in years even earlier in Sydney there was an AM network of amateur radio stations on 53.866 MHz in the 6 metre band.

    The small Icom, Kenwood and Yaesu 160 to 6 m transceivers all have Advanced Modulation AM so for lots of AM fun bring your AM transmitter on your next radio holiday in Australia.

    Regarding identifying a weak AM broadcast station from a weak AM ham radio station you can try to zero beat and listen for music.

    Regarding the idea of operating 5 kHz away from an AM station. This is excellent especially when clear frequencies are available.

    It is also a good idea because some countries allow amateurs to use parts of the 7 MHz band on a shared basis with AM broadcast stations.

    Here in Australia we share 7 MHz with Radio Australia and Radio New Zealand and many others in the 7.2 to 7.3 MHz band.

    It is because there is no interference from amateur radio stations to AM broadcasters that they have been happy to share parts of the 7 MHz broadcast bands with ham radio stations.

    Many years on and today with the support of broadcast stations at the UN ITU we have an expanded 7.1 to 7.2 MHz for many hams worldwide who were restricted from 7.000 to 7.100 MHz.

    For many years Amateur Radio stations in the Americas, Australia, New Zealand, Pacific and Somalia have had access to the whole band 7.000 to 7.300 MHz.

    If we keep 5 kHz away (whenever possible) from both AM hams and AM broadcasters so as to avoid interference we may come to the day when broadcasters open the whole of 7.0 to 7.3 MHz for amateur radio stations worldwide as they have done for 7.0 to 7.2 MHz.


    73,
    Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A
    Email somaliahamradio@yahoo.com
    Website https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Middle TN, 50 mi NW of Nashville
    Posts
    8,357

    Default Horn of Africa Conflict disrupts "new" 40m band

    Quote Originally Posted by VK2BVS View Post
    First afternoon in the expanded 7.100 to 7.200 MHz 40 metre band.

    At 1740 UTC there were 6 short wave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.
    7110 kHz Radio Ethiopia in Addis Ababa 59
    7125 kHz s/off at 1808 UTC
    7145 kHz Radio Hargeisa in Somaliland. (East Africa)
    7165 kHz music and foreign language very strong S9.
    7170 kHz music and foreign language very strong S9.
    7180 kHz music and foreign language very strong S9.

    At 1906 UTC there were 4 short wave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.
    7.100 Voice of Korea, Pyongyang, North Korea (North East Asia).
    7.110 Radio Ethiopia, Addis Ababa (East Africa).
    7.175 Voice of Broad Masses of Eritrea (Voice of the people of Eritrea) (East Africa).
    7.110 Radio Ethiopia, Addis Ababa (East Africa). Sign off at 2100 UTC
    Radio Ethiopia on 7110 continues to be strong here from s/on at 0300Z until fade-out around 0700Z.

    Last evening North American time, 0400Z Monday morning, a strong white noise was heard, centred on 7165, wiping out the band from 7155 to 7175.

    Monday evening N American time (0340Z Tuesday), strong unmodulated carriers simultaneously appear on 7165 and 7175.

    Approx 0350Z, Ethiopian sounding music starts up on 7175. Frequent announcements, apparently in Tigrinya, able to regognise frequent mentions of Eritrea.

    0358Z, Sounds like Ethiopian music on the 7165 station.

    0400Z, Jamming starts up on top of 7175 station. The 7175 station QSY's to zero-beat the 7165 station. Simultaneous modulation from both stations clearly audible. After about 5 seconds, the jamming starts up on top of 7165 frequency, covering up both signals.

    Approx 0410Z, jamming briefly stops, both signals still clearly audible. Jamming starts up again.

    Ethiopia, Somalia, Djibouti and Eritrea are virtually in a state of war with each other. The US State Dept has issued a warning urging Americans to avoid travel to Eritrea at this time. Foreigners in Eritrea are restricted to the city limits of Asmara. Requests for permission to travel outside the city limits must be submitted 10 days before the proposed travel. All persons are advised to stay away from the Eritrea-Ethiopian border. Troops are reportedly amassed along this border, and Eritrean troops are amassed along Djibouti border, reportedly crossing into the territory of Djibouti. Ethiopian troops are actively fighting in Somalia. For foreigners, travel to Mogadishu is said to be virtual suicide.

    Just a few years ago Ethiopia and Eritrea, two of the poorest countries in Africa, fought a border war over some empty and useless desert territory. Although the conflict was supposedly settled, things are heating back up again.

    It sounds like Ethiopia is jamming the Eritrean station on 7175, so it moves to 7165, on top of the other station, and the jamming follows it there and covers both stations.

    I was able to recognise the sound of the music and languages, having lived in Eritrea for 3 years during the late 60's, although I cannot understand the language.
    Last edited by K4KYV; 03-31-2009 at 04:56 AM.
    Hard Core AM since 1959

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