Spi-Ro traps

Discussion in 'Antennas, Feedlines, Towers & Rotors' started by W0CMO, May 20, 2019.

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  1. W9GB

    W9GB Ham Member QRZ Page

    It would be a good idea to have those instructions SCANNED (PDF creation), so that other radio amateurs have access to information.
    Doubtful that Spi-Ro will provide them, since Rick, WB4IRC is now a Silent Key (2018).
     
  2. WA9UAA

    WA9UAA Ham Member QRZ Page

    Put the trap across a GDO or antenna analyzer note the readings at the frequency of choice, reverse the trap and run it again. I'm going to guess it has something to do with the direction the coil is wound.
    73,
    Rob
     
  3. KP4SX

    KP4SX XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Maybe there's some 'gimmick' capacitor arrangement that is only connected on one side? Just a guess.
     
  4. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Used to hear stuff like this in dark hallways of school..."Wanna buy some Black Dot?":)
     
    NH7RO likes this.
  5. NH7RO

    NH7RO Ham Member QRZ Page

    One always had to wary of the Black Dot Trap...;)
     
  6. KA0HCP

    KA0HCP XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Long John Silver had similar problems...
     
    NH7RO likes this.
  7. NH7RO

    NH7RO Ham Member QRZ Page

    I believe the black eye patch/peg leg cottage industry caught on because of his antics back in the days of pirated gold doubloons and casks of West Indies rum.

    Here's some rather interesting trivia that I ran across on trikipedia that really "shivered me timbers" in a manner of speaking;

    "Many pirate radio stations can trace their lineage all the way back to Blackbeard's days of pillage on the high seas. Apparently, some technically inclined pirates banded together and were able to loot many flotillas of Spanish and Portuguese ships and they would coordinate their attacks and escapes via early CB radios! After several decades, one of the slightly bored pirates got the idea of broadcasting sailor's songs and pirated music during his "downtime" and thus pirate radio stations began---"setting up ship" along various coasts, playing the top songs of the seas and the stations enjoyed a large following of landlocked listeners. High Seas Hit Parades became all the rage along the British and Atlantic coasts.

    One of the most entrepreneurial pirates was named Mr. John Silver. He made his greatest fortune after years of pirating by investing in a totally legit fast-seafood franchise that still exists across the United States called
    Long John Silver's."

    Sounds a little fishy to me but at least it was an interesting diversion on a Sunday afternoon...
     
    KA0HCP likes this.

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