Soldering Iron Temperature

Discussion in 'Homebrew and Kit Projects' started by KD2NOM, Jan 11, 2018.

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  1. KD2NOM

    KD2NOM XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Wow - so the Kester solder I have is SN60PB40 which according to the charts it has a Solidus of 183 degrees C and a Liquidus of 238 degrees C - I am going to test soldering at these lower temps.
     
  2. W9GB

    W9GB Ham Member QRZ Page

    Kerry thanks for that Micron solder station (AU) adaptation.
    Here is another Micron adventure.
    http://ludzinc.blogspot.com.au/2015/01/soldering-station-conversion.html

    Hakko 926 (discontinued when Hakko 936 introduced in early 1990s)
    Used a ceramic heater.
    Only Ungar (California) was using ceramic heaters before Hakko adopted in the 926 design.

    D996030F-97AA-4ED8-903A-8CE669121306.jpeg 10556178-551B-4FF9-A2ED-32E3639D124F.gif

    Sorny Roong (Solomon) SR-976
    Solomon's clone of the 25 year old Hakko 926 design, they flipped (mirror imaged controls).
    http://soldering.com.tw/soldering-station/SR-976.html
    2467AE37-C4D8-4D3B-932B-7B4D364D143A.jpeg

    Micron T-2090 (ceramic heater)
    Looks like an OEM privare label from Solomon.
    http://www.altronics.com.au/p/t209-micron-economy-40w-soldering-station/
    B3B94DDC-42CD-4510-BD29-DB0A97A34FE3.jpeg 28BF69B9-D9B7-432C-8134-310AB3393F97.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
  3. W9GB

    W9GB Ham Member QRZ Page

    REMEMBER that the Electrical Component Leads are “heat sinks” that must be raised to 183° C
    for the solder to flow ... AND you DO NOT desire to “loiter” on those leads (damage component).
     
  4. KD2NOM

    KD2NOM XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    RRR - I was practicing and noticed that I still get very good flow and joints around 310-350 C
     
  5. WA7PRC

    WA7PRC Ham Member QRZ Page

    Sn63/Pb37 is eutectic. There's an extensive list of alloys here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solder#Solder_alloys.
     
  6. W9GB

    W9GB Ham Member QRZ Page

    NO, you mis-read the Solder Alloy Chart.
    https://www.kester.com/Portals/0/Documents/Knowledge Base/Alloy Properties.pdf?ver=2016-08-05-104108-977

    Pure Tin (100% Sn) : 232° C (450° F)
    Pure Lead (100% Pb) : 327° C (621° F)
    ==
    Tin (Sn) / Lead (Pb) solders.

    63 / 37 : Tin/Lead Eutectic - 183° C (361° F)

    60 / 40 : 183° C Solid, 191° C Liquid. Plastic State: 183-191° C (361-376° F)
    ANY movement of joint or component during plastic state results in cold (bad) solder joint.
     
  7. W9GB

    W9GB Ham Member QRZ Page

    310 to 350° C : (590 to 660° F)
    The solder joints, on your kits and PC boards are small mass, quickly heated.
    That temperature range is at the “low end” for 63/37 and 60/40 tin-lead solders.

    Results change, when you moved to point-to-point wiring (larger joint mass) —
    such as toggle switches, terminal strips, and “FP” style electrolytic capacitors.
    In those cases, a larger mass tip 3/32” (0.93 inch or 2.38 mm) helps for better heat transfer.

    The typical temperature range, used on adjustable solder stations by commercial industry,
    for “General Rework” with Tin / Lead solders: 340 to 370° C (650 to 700° F).

    As Bryan has noted ... the Solder Tip MASS (Profile and Width) are the MORE Important adjustments — once you set the Correct Temperature Range for the Solder Alloy.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
  8. KD2NOM

    KD2NOM XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Thank you again for the clarification - I actually read it write and wrote it down wrong - derp!
     
  9. VK2TIL

    VK2TIL Ham Member QRZ Page

    Kerry thanks for that Micron solder station (AU) adaptation.

    G'day Greg.

    My Micron was purchased about 1982 as well as I can remember; it is therefore about 35 years old. I've thought occasionally about getting a new station but this one is like that pair of old slippers, worn but comfortable.

    It has done a zillion joints, from 0402 SMD (under the microscope) to copper & brass sheet, nuts and the like.

    [​IMG]

    I'm fairly sure that it was made in Japan, although there is no sticker on it; perhaps there was never a sticker or perhaps it has fallen-off.

    The photo is of the "hot" end of the bench; visible are a waterbottle for the sponge, a tip-holder, a Micron de-soldering gun, the inevitable & ubiquitous 40-watt Weller (older than the Micron) and a small heat-gun (the blueish-purple object on its hook on the right behind the Weller).

    Under the bench is a box with soldering paraphernalia, including a few spare tips of the el-cheapo ebay kind;

    [​IMG]

    (There are more in the store-room in case I run low).

    I have other soldering gear; a 200-watter, a Portasol gas-torch iron and a Scope (not sold in the US) with both small & large handpieces. Only the Portasol sees occasional use these days.
     
  10. SM0XHJ

    SM0XHJ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Wow! That's a lot of soldering tips :)

    I can really recommend brass wool instead of a sponge with water. Water leads to oxidation and wear on the tip.
     
    G4COE likes this.

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