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MIAMI RADIO AMATEURS WILL BE LAUNCHING FOUR HIGH ALTITUDE BALLONS. SHOULD CIRCUMNAVIGATE PLANET.

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by K4LCD, Sep 13, 2019.

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  1. KC9SGV

    KC9SGV Ham Member QRZ Page

    Read somewhere on the internet that an estimated 70000 party balloons accidentally get released by kids and party goers every year.
    Just over the U.S. alone.
    Without lights or ADS-B transponders on them....
    Just to bring things into perspective.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2019
  2. K4LCD

    K4LCD Ham Member QRZ Page

  3. WR2E

    WR2E Ham Member QRZ Page

    So Juan... if all of your friends jumped off a bridge...……………………
     
  4. K4LCD

    K4LCD Ham Member QRZ Page

    WR2E likes this.
  5. K3LI

    K3LI Ham Member QRZ Page

    From the FAA notification to airmen.

    Any airspace that requires the use of a Transponder today will on January 01, 2020 also require aircraft to be equipped with a Version 2 ADS-B Out system. This can be either a 1090ES (DO-260B) ADS-B system or a UAT (DO-282B) ADS-B system.

    For aircraft operating above FL180 (18,000 ft.) or to comply with ADS-B mandates outside the United States, you must be equipped with a Mode-S transponder-based ADS-B transmitter. For aircraft operating below 18,000 ft. and within the United States ADS-B rule airspace, you must be equipped with either a Mode-S transponder-based ADS-B transmitter or with UAT equipment.
     
    K0UO likes this.
  6. N5RFX

    N5RFX Ham Member QRZ Page

    https://medium.com/loonar-technolog...h-altitude-balloon-to-near-space-742a0acf0c45

    Explains the exemption to the FAA regulations.

    Your payload is less than four pounds

    • Or, your payload is less than six pounds and the smallest surface is more than 36 square inches (6 inches by 6 inches)

    • If you have two payloads, they weigh less than 12 pounds together

    • If you have a rope, it takes less than 50 pounds of force to break it off (just don’t use carbon fiber, regular rope should be fine).
     
    W0PV likes this.
  7. K4LCD

    K4LCD Ham Member QRZ Page


    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Thank you

    Imagine that!

    Our party balloon payloads weigh approximately TEN GRAMS (There are 28 grams in One Ounce)
    .

    With regards 73,

    Juan /K4LCD
     
  8. K0UO

    K0UO Subscriber QRZ Page

    FYI: Also the FAA is making it very clear that they're using the word "aircraft" generically and not differentiating lighter-than-air craft, there's a lot of discussion about this on Aviation forums.
    The only distinction is if you have an aircraft (by aircraft the FAA states antique airplane or balloon) that was build with no electrical system and was not updated. So any thing with battery, solar panel or generator is now classified as having an electrical system (as of 1/1/2020)

    Maybe that's why the party balloons are exempt, LOL
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2019
  9. K4GHL

    K4GHL Ham Member QRZ Page

    Hey Juan,
    I'd suggest you give https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-i...09434073c2&mc=true&node=sp14.2.101.d&rgn=div6 a read.
    Just in case you don't feel like clicking the link, here's the text of it:

    §101.33 Operating limitations.
    No person may operate an unmanned free balloon—

    (a) Unless otherwise authorized by ATC, below 2,000 feet above the surface within the lateral boundaries of the surface areas of Class B, Class C, Class D, or Class E airspace designated for an airport;

    (b) At any altitude where there are clouds or obscuring phenomena of more than five-tenths coverage;

    (c) At any altitude below 60,000 feet standard pressure altitude where the horizontal visibility is less than five miles;

    (d) During the first 1,000 feet of ascent, over a congested area of a city, town, or settlement or an open-air assembly of persons not associated with the operation; or

    (e) In such a manner that impact of the balloon, or part thereof including its payload, with the surface creates a hazard to persons or property not associated with the operation.

    [Doc. No. 1457, 29 FR 47, Jan. 3, 1964, as amended by Amdt. 101-5, 56 FR 65662, Dec. 17, 1991]



    §101.35 Equipment and marking requirements.
    (a) No person may operate an unmanned free balloon unless—

    (1) It is equipped with at least two payload cut-down systems or devices that operate independently of each other;

    (2) At least two methods, systems, devices, or combinations thereof, that function independently of each other, are employed for terminating the flight of the balloon envelope; and

    (3) The balloon envelope is equipped with a radar reflective device(s) or material that will present an echo to surface radar operating in the 200 MHz to 2700 MHz frequency range.

    The operator shall activate the appropriate devices required by paragraphs (a) (1) and (2) of this section when weather conditions are less than those prescribed for operation under this subpart, or if a malfunction or any other reason makes the further operation hazardous to other air traffic or to persons and property on the surface.

    (b) No person may operate an unmanned free balloon below 60,000 feet standard pressure altitude between sunset and sunrise (as corrected to the altitude of operation) unless the balloon and its attachments and payload, whether or not they become separated during the operation, are equipped with lights that are visible for at least 5 miles and have a flash frequency of at least 40, and not more than 100, cycles per minute.

    (c) No person may operate an unmanned free balloon that is equipped with a trailing antenna that requires an impact force of more than 50 pounds to break it at any point, unless the antenna has colored pennants or streamers that are attached at not more than 50 foot intervals and that are visible for at least one mile.

    (d) No person may operate between sunrise and sunset an unmanned free balloon that is equipped with a suspension device (other than a highly conspicuously colored open parachute) more than 50 feet along, unless the suspension device is colored in alternate bands of high conspicuity colors or has colored pennants or streamers attached which are visible for at least one mile.

    (Sec. 6(c), Department of Transportation Act (49 U.S.C. 1655(c)))

    [Doc. No. 1457, 29 FR 47, Jan. 3, 1964, as amended by Amdt. 101-2, 32 FR 5254, Mar. 29, 1967; Amdt. 101-4, 39 FR 22252, June 21, 1974]



    §101.37 Notice requirements.
    (a) Prelaunch notice: Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, no person may operate an unmanned free balloon unless, within 6 to 24 hours before beginning the operation, he gives the following information to the FAA ATC facility that is nearest to the place of intended operation:

    (1) The balloon identification.

    (2) The estimated date and time of launching, amended as necessary to remain within plus or minus 30 minutes.

    (3) The location of the launching site.

    (4) The cruising altitude.

    (5) The forecast trajectory and estimated time to cruising altitude or 60,000 feet standard pressure altitude, whichever is lower.

    (6) The length and diameter of the balloon, length of the suspension device, weight of the payload, and length of the trailing antenna.

    (7) The duration of flight.

    (8) The forecast time and location of impact with the surface of the earth.

    (b) For solar or cosmic disturbance investigations involving a critical time element, the information in paragraph (a) of this section shall be given within 30 minutes to 24 hours before beginning the operation.

    (c) Cancellation notice: If the operation is canceled, the person who intended to conduct the operation shall immediately notify the nearest FAA ATC facility.

    (d) Launch notice: Each person operating an unmanned free balloon shall notify the nearest FAA or military ATC facility of the launch time immediately after the balloon is launched.



    §101.39 Balloon position reports.
    (a) Each person operating an unmanned free balloon shall:

    (1) Unless ATC requires otherwise, monitor the course of the balloon and record its position at least every two hours; and

    (2) Forward any balloon position reports requested by ATC.

    (b) One hour before beginning descent, each person operating an unmanned free balloon shall forward to the nearest FAA ATC facility the following information regarding the balloon:

    (1) The current geographical position.

    (2) The altitude.

    (3) The forecast time of penetration of 60,000 feet standard pressure altitude (if applicable).

    (4) The forecast trajectory for the balance of the flight.

    (5) The forecast time and location of impact with the surface of the earth.

    (c) If a balloon position report is not recorded for any two-hour period of flight, the person operating an unmanned free balloon shall immediately notify the nearest FAA ATC facility. The notice shall include the last recorded position and any revision of the forecast trajectory. The nearest FAA ATC facility shall be notified immediately when tracking of the balloon is re-established.

    (d) Each person operating an unmanned free balloon shall notify the nearest FAA ATC facility when the operation is ended.

    **********************
    You keep reiterating that your payload is only a few grams, but are you aware of the impact damage a few grams can do to an aircraft traveling at 500 miles an hour or what a balloon sucked into a turbine engine will do at that speed? To put it into perspective, my 168 grain hollowpoint bullets weigh about 10 grams and at 1000 meters it's traveling at ABOUT 500 miles an hour with 153 ftlbs of energy and will easily pierce an aircrafts skin.

    IMO your operating within the Class A airspace is both hazardous and reckless and has the potential to bring some very bad publicity to our hobby.

    It would be best if you or someone would contact the local FAA field office and supply them with your plans and design and request guidance on it, because as I read the FAA regs (and I'm sure other countries have similar rules and restrictions) what you propose is going to get someone into a world of hurt, and possibly into a huge financial liability.
     
    K0UO likes this.
  10. K4LCD

    K4LCD Ham Member QRZ Page

     

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