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MacOS Issue: iCloud Documents

Discussion in 'OS: Mac OS' started by N0TZU, Nov 5, 2016.

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  1. N0TZU

    N0TZU Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    When I upgraded to Sierra, I approved using iCloud for storing my documents and files. What I didn't fully appreciate was that they would also be removed from my local HDD!

    So in order to have a local copy for when the Internet is out, or when Apple has a problem with their servers, I now need to make a clumsy manual backup of my iCloud documents on occasion to my local drive.

    I'm really unimpressed that Apple didn't allow some options, like syncing to duplicate files in iCloud. Thst is really what I would like to have.

    Comments?
     
  2. K3DCW

    K3DCW QRZ Lifetime Member #212 Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    Dropbox.

    SymLink your Documents (or any other) folders to Dropbox. That way, you have the files on your computer, and a backup of sorts in the cloud.

    I find iCloud to be good for sync'ing settings and the such; not so much for file storage/sharing/retrieval.
     
  3. KA9JLM

    KA9JLM Ham Member QRZ Page

    The Cloud sucks with huge vacuum. :eek:
     
  4. K3DCW

    K3DCW QRZ Lifetime Member #212 Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    And if your house burns down and you need that document that was stored on your computer, and backed up on your own local cloud and local USB drives that were also in your house, then ??


    Not that I hope your house burns down, of course. Just that it is very wise to have offsite storage of key documents. Dropbox/iCloud/Sync/OneDrive and many others provide a useful service.
     
  5. KA9JLM

    KA9JLM Ham Member QRZ Page

    That is what I do. It works good and last along time. :)
     
  6. KA9JLM

    KA9JLM Ham Member QRZ Page

    Who said all of your servers had to be in one location ? Mine are not.
     
  7. K3DCW

    K3DCW QRZ Lifetime Member #212 Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    That's the key. I never said cloud computing was the only solution. Having a backup of IMPORTANT information (not just receipts on a computer) offsite, in whatever form, is a very good idea. The data you NEED (such as passwords, insurance documents, tax data, banking info, legal info, etc) that you may keep on your computer (not everyone does, of course) are protected somehow, someway. Cloud computing makes it easy, but it is far from the only answer.

    I use Dropbox and Sync, plus an online full backup of my system via Backblaze. That works for me as I have fully-encrypted back up copies of all of my information in 3 completely separate locations in two separate countries with full history protection and more. That doesn't count my local TimeMachine backup as well, which I have as another layer of protection.

    Others use "sneaker net" by handing physical media off to others as you do, or storing it in safe deposit box or the such. That is very reliable, but only as up-to-date as your latest distributed copy. However, that's more than adequate for you, so that's good.

    An USB thumb drive attached to the computer, or located in the same building, is not a reliable backup for IMPORTANT info.

    Like you, I'm largely paperless and I keep everything important fully backed up, usually the instant that I scan it thanks to cloud technology. There are different solutions for different people. I know, as do you, that if my house were to burn down I would lose nothing important and could be back up and running (in terms of accessing all of my information) within minutes.

    If others don't want to use cloud computing or offsite backups, that's their decision. It's all good as everyone has to choose the level of data protection their comfortable with. It is a personal choice and a personal solution. I don't condemn any particular technology like some might; it all has its role and function. That being said, in response to the OP's comments, iCloud sucks as a service. It is fine for backing up the settings and sharing password info between your Mac and your phone, for example; but I find the random write delays, the slow speed, and the outrageous pricing to be sufficient as to make it largely useless. I wouldn't even touch the Documents and Desktop setting for iCloud. That's just an accident waiting to happen.
     
  8. KD8DEY

    KD8DEY Ham Member QRZ Page

    They had a basic course on C++ at ITT and I couldnt get a handle on it.
    Gotta give a hand to "Programmers"
     

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