IRLP Repeater

Discussion in 'Echolink/IRLP Tech Board' started by K6DEA, Apr 14, 2012.

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  1. K6DEA

    K6DEA Ham Member

    I found a local IRLP Repeater... how come no one talks on it?
     
  2. KC9UDX

    KC9UDX Subscriber

    Have you? If not, there's your answer.
     
  3. K6DEA

    K6DEA Ham Member

    Yup keyed with my call. What is the repeater for ?
     
  4. KC9UDX

    KC9UDX Subscriber

    I often wonder about that... Lots of repeaters, lots of guys listening, no one responding...
     
  5. K6DEA

    K6DEA Ham Member

    Maybe the way I started this thread is wrong.

    What is IRLP I imagine Google can help me figure that out. This thread can be deleted.
     
  6. K0RGR

    K0RGR Premium Subscriber

    IRLP is similar to EchoLink, but it's Linux based, and you can only access it through a radio - no access via computer.

    Find out who owns the IRLP node and see if it's OK to use it. If so, you might want to use IRLP to dial into a number of different nets and active reflectors.
    http://irlp.net/ The western reflector and the WIN System reflector are pretty busy. There is an Insomniac Net late at night on one of the reflectors, too.
     
  7. KC9UDX

    KC9UDX Subscriber

    Well, I have to apologise, I completely missed your point.

    IRLP = Internet Relay Linking Project. K0RGR is 100% on.

    There is IRLP, EchoLink, and AllStar. I've never used any of them, but I hear them being used all the time to link repeaters over long distances.
     
  8. W5SMD

    W5SMD Ham Member

    IRLP is a way of connecting repeaters over the internet. You talk to your local repeater using the radio, it sends the data over the internet to other repeaters that it is connected to, and they decode the data and transmit your voice on the radio. You usually have to dial in the ID number of the repeater you want to connect to. See http://status.irlp.net/ for node numbers.

    I usually connect to the Alaska reflector because it has about 40ish repeaters connected to it. (A reflector allows multiple repeaters to connect to each other) To connect, ask if your local repeater is busy. If there is no response, dial "9070" using the numeric keypad on your radio. The repeater should respond with a message like "Link connected" or something to that effect. Remember to listen for a little longer than usual because you didn't hear traffic that could be on the other repeaters before you connected.

    Instead of giving just your callsign, you may want to state your location and that you are on IRLP. For example "This is W5SMD from Fort Worth, Texas on IRLP. Are there any stations available for a QSO? W5SMD" After your conversation, disconnect from the reflector by keying your radio and dialing "73".

    I have talked to many stations in the US and Canada, as well as one in Australia using a handheld radio and IRLP. Good Luck.
     
  9. KC9UDX

    KC9UDX Subscriber

    Still make sure you have permission first. Someone (maybe a club) owns that repeater and may not want just anyone linking up. Also, it's a good idea to identify every time before dialing just so everyone listening knows it's not some unlicensed ]CENSORED[ playing around trying to lock up the repeater.
     
  10. KF4NPM

    KF4NPM Ham Member

    wa wos de questin?,,,,oh there s a repeter on the ,but dont hear no boti in it!!!!! d

    :cool::mad:
    so thre is,funuie,jejeje!

    :confused:
    :cool::cool:
    :rolleyes::eek:
     
  11. KF4NPM

    KF4NPM Ham Member

    i
    i the thi.let me know.if you hear anything!
     
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