Intentionally Transmitting Non Flat SSB Audio ?

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by KA7NIQ, Apr 3, 2011.

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  1. KA7NIQ

    KA7NIQ Ham Member QRZ Page

    We used to play with mikes back in the good old AM days, and not surprisingly, there was no one best mike for all people. I happen to like Tube Microphones when I was into all that, because you can change tubes, and change the sound. The acoustic absorbing material inside the mike also effects the sound, and changes in sound can be had by varying the type, amount, and/or position of this material in relation to the microphone element. One guy had a really good sounding AM setup, using an old Johnson Plate Modulated AM rig with a Hallicrafters SX 101 MK 3A receiver. He had a tube type microphone that was fairly well known, yet no one could figure out how he got "that sound". His Secret was, he used a Mullard Tube in the microphone, and removed some of the acoustic absorbing material inside the Mike to "tune it" to his voice. He also replaced and/or bypassed every signal path electrolytic capacitor in the old Johnson and the microphone with audio grade caps. Of course, he was also blessed with a commanding baritone voice! He had a commanding sound, much like a cross between a young Henry Kissinger, and Walter Cronkite.
    He used No EQ, Compressor, or Reverb. He was a 'purist', and also an audiophile. I can't imagine him ever intentionally making his transmit audio bandwidth wider. The mere suggestion of something like that would probably wind you up on the wrong end of the "Wouff Houng", if anyone remembers That ?
     
  2. W8ZNX

    W8ZNX Ham Member QRZ Page

    Hello Radio Boys

    few weeks ago
    friends and myself chewing the rag on 75
    station "xxx" try's to check in

    sounds horrid / not making the grade
    lots of lows no highs weak mid range

    so the guys tell him,
    your a good 57
    but your audio is no good

    he then spends 5 min telling us about
    how much he has spent on mixers mikes
    other things to have the best audio

    the response was unplug it all
    and plug in the stock mike you got with the radio

    he told us we were all full of blank

    never did get his call or name

    why do they do it
    easy

    appliance ops
    can not fix or build

    add knobs
    expensive mikes mixers and audio processors

    helps
    ops that can not build a regen receiver
    qrp kit or dipole antenna

    feel like real radio ops

    crank those knobs
    is this better
    is this better
    let me change mikes
    is this better
    is this better

    let me switch in the Behringer deq2495
    is this better
    is this better
    lets try the Newman U87 condenser mike
    what do you mean
    you can't hear me

    i spent 3 grand for this mike

    dit dit
    mac
     
  3. KD1MA

    KD1MA Ham Member QRZ Page

    Exactly.

    Personally, I am not interested in running above 3 kc wide but with some EQ utilized depending on what the purpose of my transmission may be, e.g., contesting, ragchewing, emergency traffic, DXing, etc. However, I don't have a problem with ESSBers as long as they transmit in certain segments of the bands as the AMers voluntarily do. There is room for everybody in this hobby. There is not room for inconsideration.
     
  4. KA7NIQ

    KA7NIQ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Agreed, my Kenwood TS 850 has a high boost switch to punch through pileups and bad band conditions. I leave it off for normal rag chewing.
     
  5. W4PG

    W4PG Super Moderator Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    It seems that those ranting about ESSB have not heard of AM, which can take up 6 KHz or more! Last time I checked, AM was legal in all phone sections. Most every rig sold today has an "AM" mode, but not an ESSB without modifications. So, I wouldn't get too worried about it taking over the phone bands. But, the reality is, wider audio sounds better and allows one to process audio in a fashion that can't be done with just 3 KHz. I don't transmit ESSB, but them's the facts.

    Those who claim "yea, but it doesn't add anything to the intelligibility!" are missing the point. The purpose of ESSB is to provide a more pleasing audio characteristic.

    I shape my audio with a digital processor and get great reports with folks asking me all the time what I am running. It's still under 3 KHz wide, however. Yet when done correctly, the result is clearly much better than what the stock rig can do. It's not hard to spot someone with such processing. Their audio sounds worlds better (if done correctly!).

    So, we need to differentiate between ESSB and typical SSB that is shaped. The two are not the same!

    ..............Bob
     
  6. AC0H

    AC0H Ham Member QRZ Page

    +10
    Ding, ding, ding.....we have a winner!
     
  7. KA7NIQ

    KA7NIQ Ham Member QRZ Page

    Good Morning Bob! You bring up a good point. Shaped audio and ESSB are different animals.
     
  8. WS4B

    WS4B Ham Member QRZ Page

    Forget ESSB. Go AM!!!!

    Thank you, and I meant every word of it. If someone really wants to sound good, try AM. I'm telling you I finally understand why AMers (which I now consider myself as) love the mode as much as we do. It provides wonderful fidelity with an overall increased quality of QSO IMO. It's certainly not a 5/9 and 73 type of mode.

    I'm also working on my Old Buzzard transmissions, and getting better day by day! :)
     
  9. KA7NIQ

    KA7NIQ Ham Member QRZ Page

    What do you use on AM, the FT 102 ?
    I have never tried my Kenwood 850 on AM. Have you ever heard an 850 on AM ?
    Back in my AM Days, plate modulation was king. Those old Johnsons can really sound very special. Where do the AM guys hang out now ?
     
  10. KA4DPO

    KA4DPO Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I agree and all of my new radios have adjustable transmit EQ built in as part of the DSP. If you have a really good mic you should never need any outboard EQ or compression to make it sound natural. A good mic on a properly adjusted rig is hard to beat.
     
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