FT8 Burnout? Possible Remedy: Conversation

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by NW7US, Nov 22, 2017.

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  1. KB9VLH

    KB9VLH Ham Member QRZ Page

    I still have my KamPlus and Timewave PK96 for good old tried and true RTTY - HF Packet - Gtor - Amtor the
    Timewave for 1200/9600 packet
    KEYBOARD TO KEYBOARD for me !!
     
  2. W4HM

    W4HM XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Olivia is a nice mode for rag chewing that has various bandwidth's and speeds. I still see allot of Olivia use especially on 20 meters.

    Another of one of my original favorite digital modes is MFSK16. I made 74 contacts with it prior to 2013 but I see very few operators using it now. It has FEC and holds up pretty good under poor band conditions and lightning QRN.
     
  3. K5TRI

    K5TRI XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Isn't it interesting that there will always be people who feel the urge to convince everybody else that the thing they do is wrong
    and that they should switch to whatever that person deems the better?

    FT8 is just fine. Maybe not everybody is interested in long ragchews. Live and let live. There's no need to disparage one thing to promote another.
     
    K0KQ, KG5WR, NH6YK and 8 others like this.
  4. W7UUU

    W7UUU Super Moderator Lifetime Member 133 Administrator Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber Life Member QRZ Page

    Amen

    Dave
    W7UUU
     
    N7ANN, KY5U and N2ADV like this.
  5. K5TRI

    K5TRI XML Subscriber QRZ Page


    How about teaching operators how to adjust their system to generate a clean signal even at higher power levels. At the same time teach those complaining about QRM how a filter works. Does switching to a digital mode cause immediate amnesia regarding filter operation?

    Always interesting how other people know how much power is enough to complete a contact with a station without knowing the distance, propagation, antenna systems used, noise levels, and other details.
    Fascinating.
     
    KB8OTK likes this.
  6. K5TRI

    K5TRI XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    On another note, looking at the activity on 20m today on CW, SSB, and FT8 I wouldn't speak of burnout or fatigue as it pertains to FT8. Quite a lot of activity.
     
  7. NC7U

    NC7U XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Loved the Robot 800 also!
     
  8. K3FHP

    K3FHP XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Ditto! Twenty to thirty watts is plenty to work the world, 5 to 15 often do the job. Also, in error is the fact that Oli(as the fans call it) IS a 100 % duty cycle mode so running 100w for a typical Oli chat would be like key down CW for a couple of minutes at a time. You WILL damage the typical 100W SSB radio doing this, in addition to making enemies. A 100w SSB radio peaks maybe 100W while averaging 30 to 40, to say nothing of 97.313a.
     
  9. K3FHP

    K3FHP XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Oli is great and 8/500 though wider, is not that slow, but there are other great chat modes. FSQ is a good one, good to-10 to 12 db snr. Use the FSQ Call program or Fldigi and tune to 7.104. Also Contestia is a 2x faster version of Olivia though you givr up lower case. Thor, another IFSK mode is also robust and is resistant to phase shift, multipath and some drift. Set you rcvr on .072(7 or 14 for example), turn on RSID and have fun with minimal antennas and power.

    72 to all, K3FHP
     
  10. K6BRN

    K6BRN XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    100% duty cycle at 100 watts or more is no real problem, especially to those who run RTTY at 500W, which is often the minimum needed in this down cycle to close the link. It just requires a decent amplifier, and not a very big one (the KPA-500 works fine for this). And I've heard no actual complaints about Olivia or RTTY operators, maybe because It's relatively rare.

    Also - isn't it really about EIRP? So... it would be logical from your argument to conclude that Olivia (e. al.) users should be limited to a dipole antenna, as a beam antenna or large array could provide 3-9 db of gain, resulting in EIRP 3-9 db above a dipole. That means 25 watts in to the antenna nets as much as 200W EIRP above a dipole. Oooops!

    So... Whats in your shack?
     
    CARC likes this.

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