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First afternoon in the expanded 7.100 to 7.200 MHz 40 metre band.

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by VK2BVS, Mar 29, 2009.

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  1. VK2BVS

    VK2BVS Ham Member QRZ Page

    First afternoon in the expanded 7.100 to 7.200 MHz 40 metre band.

    The United Nations International Telecommunications Union date for broadcast stations to move out of the 7.100 to 7.200 MHz band of frequencies is 29 March 2009.

    This has created a worldwide amateur radio band from 7.000 to 7.200 MHz for two way ham radio communications.

    Amateur Radio operators in Somalia, Australia, New Zealand, America and some other countries can also use 7.200 to 7.300 MHz shared with broadcasting stations.

    The old 40 metre broadcast band was 7.100 to 7.350 MHz.
    As of 29 March 2009 the new 40 metre broadcast band is from 7.200 to 7.600 MHz.

    Report on the first day of operating in the newly expanded 40 metre amateur radio band during the Australian SUNSET.

    On the Australian afternoon of the 29 March 2009 UTC 0630 UTC there was 1 shortwave broadcast station in the newly expanded 40 metre amateur band from 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.

    7190 KHz (7.190 MHz) Radio Tunis in Tunisia (North Africa) was broadcasting to North and West Africa on AM with signal strength 9 in Sydney, Australia. The broadcast schedule is 0400 to 0700 UTC using 500 kW.

    Amateur radio stations from Australia, New Zealand, Europe and West Africa were heard across the dial 7.000 to 7.200 MHz. USA Amateur radio stations were heard up to 7.300 MHz.

    In Australia we have had 7.000 to 7.300 MHz for many years and it is great to hear 7.100 – 7.200 MHz so clear and full of Amateur Radio stations on the first day that it has been cleared by most short wave broadcast stations.

    7.200 to 7.300 MHz also sounds mostly clear at 0630 UTC.

    At 0740 UTC there was 1 shortwave broadcast station in the newly expanded 40 metre amateur band from 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.

    7.140 MHz Voice of Korea, Pyongyang, North Korea was over signal strength 9 broadcasting AM in Chinese to North East China.

    As a matter of interest at 0840 UTC from 7.200 to 7.300 MHz there were 4 short wave broadcasters.
    7.200 MHz station 1 music and foreign language- very strong S9.
    7.275 MHz KBS World Radio on AM in Seoul, South Korea. The broadcast schedule is 0800 to 1300 UTC, 1600 to 1900 UTC and 2200 to 2300 UTC.
    7.285 MHz Radio New Zealand in Wellington using a 100 kW DRM digital short wave radio transmitter from 0700 to 1200 UTC and 1751 to 1850 UTC. Radio New Zealand use a Short wave 100 kW AM transmitter from 1551 to 1750 UTC.
    7.295 MHz station 4 music and foreign language very strong S9.

    During Radio New Zealand DRM digital short wave radio broadcasts on 7.285 MHz Radio New Zealand is also broadcasting on AM short wave on 6.170 MHz or 9.615 MHz or 9.655 MHz.

    Report on the first day of operating in the newly expanded 40 metre amateur radio band during the Australian SUNRISE.


    A few days ago 7.100 to 7.200 MHz was full of short wave broadcast stations in the Australia morning.

    With broadcast stations moving out of the 7.100 to 7.200 MHz band only a few remain. Here is what I heard in Sydney, Australia on Sunday, 29 March 2009 GMT date (Monday 30 March 2009 Australia date).


    At 1740 UTC there were 6 short wave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.
    7110 kHz Radio Ethiopia in Addis Ababa 59
    7125 kHz s/off at 1808 UTC
    7145 kHz Radio Hargeisa in Somaliland. (East Africa)
    7165 kHz music and foreign language very strong S9.
    7170 kHz music and foreign language very strong S9.
    7180 kHz music and foreign language very strong S9.


    At 1810 UTC there were 4 shortwave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.
    7100 kHz Voice of Korea in Pyongyang, North Korea 1800 UTC. North Korea national anthem at 1902 UTC. Broadcast continued.
    7110 kHz Radio Ethiopia in the Amharic language.
    7.145 MHz Radio Hargeisa in Somaliland in the Somali language. News at 1852 UTC followed by station identification. Somaliland national anthem at 1856 UTC, Sign off at 1858 UTC.
    7175 kHz Voice of the Broad Masses of Eritrea in Asmara. Station identification at 1902 UTC followed by music. Sign off at 2000 UTC


    At 1906 UTC there were 4 short wave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.
    7.100 Voice of Korea, Pyongyang, North Korea (North East Asia).
    7.110 Radio Ethiopia, Addis Ababa (East Africa).
    7.175 Voice of Broad Masses of Eritrea (Voice of the people of Eritrea) (East Africa).
    7.190 MHz Radio Tunis in Tunisia signs on with the call to prayer at 1906 UTC (North Africa).


    At 2000 UTC there were 5 short wave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.
    7.100 Voice of Korea, Pyongyang, North Korea (North East Asia). Sign off before 2050 UTC.
    7.110 Radio Ethiopia, Addis Ababa (East Africa). Sign off at 2100 UTC
    7.135 MHz Jamming station heard presumed jamming the Voice of Iraqi Kurdistan. No jamming and no stations at 2100 UTC.
    7170 kHz China or North Korea opened with time signal and National Anthem at 2000UTC.
    7.190 MHz Radio Tunis in Tunisia.


    At 2100 UTC there were 4 short wave broadcast stations between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz
    7.125 MHz China or North Korea at 2050 UTC.
    7170 kHz China or North Korea.
    7.180 MHz Voice of Korea, Pyongyang, North Korea (North East Asia) opened with North Korea National Anthem at 2100 UTC.
    7.190 MHz Radio Tunis in Tunisia. The broadcast schedule is 1700 to 0000 UTC using 500 kW.


    As a matter of interest at 1800 to 2000 UTC there were 2 short wave broadcast stations below 7.000 MHz.
    Radio Cairo, Egypt on 6.860 MHz (North Africa) and Israel Defence Forces Radio GLZ (Galey Zahal, IDF Radio, Israel Army Radio) on 6973 KHz in Hebrew (Middle East).

    In this time period 7.200 to 7.300 MHz is well used by short wave broadcasting stations.

    Enjoy the 40metere band.

    73,
    Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A
    Email somaliahamradio@yahoo.com
    Website https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2009
  2. KI4MXO

    KI4MXO Ham Member QRZ Page

    cool! see you on the air sometime!
     
  3. VK6POP

    VK6POP Ham Member QRZ Page

    40 m clear of Broadcasters?

    Glad to see 40m is clear in Sydney. It will take a bit longer, I fear, for the less compliant stations in Asia to move.

    Here in VK6 we seem to be in the footprint of the first hop from Asia on 40 metres, and stations from that area are quite strong.

    Here's hoping the band will come good for all of us soon.

    73
     
  4. WA3VJB

    WA3VJB Ham Member QRZ Page

    AM on 40m

    A reminder in surveys like this to kindly observe those of us on AM as part of the vintage radio aspect of the hobby.

    Hearing a heterodyne may NOT mean it's a leftover broadcast station.

    Thanks
     
  5. XE1RA

    XE1RA Ham Member QRZ Page

    xe1lpe international monitoring service of IARU_FMRE . region 2 from mexico city . tomorrow we goin to chek about 7.100-7.200. in this area in north america and central america . 73s to all estations . contac to my estation by internet . email . xe1lpe@yahoo.com.mx
     
  6. KC8VWM

    KC8VWM Ham Member QRZ Page

    I flipped the switch on the BC 348Q as I am typing this reply. Seems I am still hearing broadcasters below 7.200... Sounds like music from India or something..

    Perhaps this will take more time?

    73 de Charles - KC8VWM
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2009
  7. SM7DLK

    SM7DLK Ham Member QRZ Page

    Radio Belarus on 7135 khz is still alive this morning.

    Goran SM7DLK
     
  8. WA3VJB

    WA3VJB Ham Member QRZ Page

    Here at 1400 GMT I am about to fire up on 40m to see what's going on.

    But I've checked my email box and found a friendly query from someone asking for guidance as to best practices to continue making way for AM activity among fellow radio hobbyists.

    I had posted, in this thread, the fact not all AM activity on 40 meters is that from international broadcasters, and I requested please to try to make way for us.

    I took a few minutes to reply to him, and thought I would offer the same information to others, with kind regards.

    Catch you on the radio (starting out around 7290Kc)

    >
     
  9. VK2BVS

    VK2BVS Ham Member QRZ Page

    Advanced Modulation AM on ham radio in the 21st century.

    Hello to all fellow Advanced Modulation AM users.

    Enemies of AM call us the Ancient Modulation users hi hi (radio joke).

    Others call AM Amplitude Modulation which is also used when getting technical hi hi (this hi hi is not a radio joke).

    This year in Australian amateur radio I have heard-

    AM ham radio in Sydney, Australia on 1.860 MHz at 11am (or after the WIA, our ARRL equivalent broadcast) each Sunday.

    AM amateur radio from VK2WI on 1.845 MHz (a 30 minute to 1 hour AM amateur radio news broadcast from the WIA, the Australian equivalent of the USA ARRL) each Sunday.

    AM ham radio from Melbourne, Australia on 160 metres from 11pm till way past midnight on 1.850 MHz.

    AM amateur radio from Melbourne, Australia on 80 metres around 3.680 MHz working cross band by transmitting continuously on 80 metres AM and receiving a continuous Ham radio AM station on 160 metres. Like a telephone conversation.

    AM ham radio round table cross banding between one AM ham station on 160 m, another on 80 m and a third ham station on 2m FM. This is also called an AM MF HF FM VHF QSO pronounced Ammfhffmvhfqso hi hi (Here hi hi refers to the pronunciation which is a radio joke).

    AM amateur radio contacts in the evenings after 9 pm around 3.675 MHz.

    The NSW VK2 Wireless Institute of Australia is replacing its old 80 metre band broadcast transmitter for a new one that will operate on 3.595 MHz. It has been used for years on AM until the old unit failed. The 80 m ham radio broadcast is temporarily on SSB but will return to AM as soon as possible.

    Each of the 8 Wireless Institute of Australia regions, states or territories of Australia (VK1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8) have their own broadcasts each week and several use amateur radio AM to allow Short Wave Listeners to learn about amateur radio. Wireless Institute of Australia amateur radio AM broadcasts is normally on 160, 80 and/or 40 metres.

    AM amateur radio conversations between Queensland VK4, New South Wales VK2 and Victoria VK3 ham radio stations around 7.120 MHz around midday.

    I have enjoyed an AM contact from Sydney to Adelaide on the 12 metre band on 24.980 MHz and AM ham radio from 29.0 to 29.1 MHz in the 10 m AM amateur radio band between Sydney VK2 New South Wales and Adelaide VK5 South Australia.

    I have heard a few opening to Hawaii on 28 MHz so hopefully contacts between Australia and the USA will soon be possible in the 29.0 to 29.1 MHz in the 10 m AM amateur radio band.

    For the first time I have an antenna for 10 m AM and I am looking forward to lots of nice Advanced Modulation conversations on 29 MHz.

    In previous years I have heard a worldwide AM network of ham radio stations on 14.286 MHz in the 20 metre band and in years even earlier in Sydney there was an AM network of amateur radio stations on 53.866 MHz in the 6 metre band.

    The small Icom, Kenwood and Yaesu 160 to 6 m transceivers all have Advanced Modulation AM so for lots of AM fun bring your AM transmitter on your next radio holiday in Australia.

    Regarding identifying a weak AM broadcast station from a weak AM ham radio station you can try to zero beat and listen for music.

    Regarding the idea of operating 5 kHz away from an AM station. This is excellent especially when clear frequencies are available.

    It is also a good idea because some countries allow amateurs to use parts of the 7 MHz band on a shared basis with AM broadcast stations.

    Here in Australia we share 7 MHz with Radio Australia and Radio New Zealand and many others in the 7.2 to 7.3 MHz band.

    It is because there is no interference from amateur radio stations to AM broadcasters that they have been happy to share parts of the 7 MHz broadcast bands with ham radio stations.

    Many years on and today with the support of broadcast stations at the UN ITU we have an expanded 7.1 to 7.2 MHz for many hams worldwide who were restricted from 7.000 to 7.100 MHz.

    For many years Amateur Radio stations in the Americas, Australia, New Zealand, Pacific and Somalia have had access to the whole band 7.000 to 7.300 MHz.

    If we keep 5 kHz away (whenever possible) from both AM hams and AM broadcasters so as to avoid interference we may come to the day when broadcasters open the whole of 7.0 to 7.3 MHz for amateur radio stations worldwide as they have done for 7.0 to 7.2 MHz.


    73,
    Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A
    Email somaliahamradio@yahoo.com
    Website https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio
     
  10. K4KYV

    K4KYV Subscriber QRZ Page

    Horn of Africa Conflict disrupts "new" 40m band

    Radio Ethiopia on 7110 continues to be strong here from s/on at 0300Z until fade-out around 0700Z.

    Last evening North American time, 0400Z Monday morning, a strong white noise was heard, centred on 7165, wiping out the band from 7155 to 7175.

    Monday evening N American time (0340Z Tuesday), strong unmodulated carriers simultaneously appear on 7165 and 7175.

    Approx 0350Z, Ethiopian sounding music starts up on 7175. Frequent announcements, apparently in Tigrinya, able to regognise frequent mentions of Eritrea.

    0358Z, Sounds like Ethiopian music on the 7165 station.

    0400Z, Jamming starts up on top of 7175 station. The 7175 station QSY's to zero-beat the 7165 station. Simultaneous modulation from both stations clearly audible. After about 5 seconds, the jamming starts up on top of 7165 frequency, covering up both signals.

    Approx 0410Z, jamming briefly stops, both signals still clearly audible. Jamming starts up again.

    Ethiopia, Somalia, Djibouti and Eritrea are virtually in a state of war with each other. The US State Dept has issued a warning urging Americans to avoid travel to Eritrea at this time. Foreigners in Eritrea are restricted to the city limits of Asmara. Requests for permission to travel outside the city limits must be submitted 10 days before the proposed travel. All persons are advised to stay away from the Eritrea-Ethiopian border. Troops are reportedly amassed along this border, and Eritrean troops are amassed along Djibouti border, reportedly crossing into the territory of Djibouti. Ethiopian troops are actively fighting in Somalia. For foreigners, travel to Mogadishu is said to be virtual suicide.

    Just a few years ago Ethiopia and Eritrea, two of the poorest countries in Africa, fought a border war over some empty and useless desert territory. Although the conflict was supposedly settled, things are heating back up again.

    It sounds like Ethiopia is jamming the Eritrean station on 7175, so it moves to 7165, on top of the other station, and the jamming follows it there and covers both stations.

    I was able to recognise the sound of the music and languages, having lived in Eritrea for 3 years during the late 60's, although I cannot understand the language.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2009
  11. VK4ZY

    VK4ZY Ham Member QRZ Page

    A little time and patience and a lot more hams with decent beam antennas running a bit of power will displace those stations who have not yet decided to relocate.
    With the wider allocation there will likely be a lot more people see it as worth the effort to run a decent antenna.
    73 de Kev. VK4KKD
     
  12. WB9JTK

    WB9JTK Ham Member QRZ Page

    There is a misconception and continued erroneous repeating of the statement that 7.1 to 7.2 MHz will be amateur radio only.

    There are many countries that will continue to use this part of the band for commercial purposes.

    U.S. hams can read the article in QST April 2009 page 60

    Secondary allocation to fixed and land mobile services 7000 kHz to 7200 kHz
    Uzbekistan
    Kyrgyzstan

    7100 kHz to 7200 kHz Primary allocation to fixed and mobile except aeronautical mobile:

    Algeria
    Saudi Arabia
    Australia
    Bahrain
    Botswana
    Brunei Darussalam
    China
    Comoros
    Korea (rep of)
    Dieg Garcia
    Djibouti
    Egypt
    UAE
    Eritrea
    Indonesia
    Iran
    Japan
    Jordan
    Kuwait
    Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
    Morocco
    Mauritania
    New Zealand
    Oman
    Papua New Guinea
    Qatar
    Syrian Arab Republic
    Singapore
    Sudan
    Tunisia
    Viet Nam
    Yemen

    I have no idea what emissions modes these services will be using.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2009
  13. AD2AM

    AD2AM Ham Member QRZ Page

    re: Horn of Africa Conflict disrupts "new" 40m band

    Strangely, that sounds a lot like 80m phone late at night in North America. One hopes that hams won't resort to armed conflict after they are transmitted over, jammed, followed around the band, etc... :O
     
  14. KC2RJA

    KC2RJA Ham Member QRZ Page

    so is this removal of broadcasting am stations giving us stateside stations 7125-7600mhz also or is this just allocating a wider range of freq. for european etc. stations?
     
  15. VK2BVS

    VK2BVS Ham Member QRZ Page

    Hi Ryan KC2RJA,

    The result of the changes on 7 MHz is an expanded 40m band for hams in most countries that only had 7.000 to 7.100 MHz.

    You will see a list of countries posted earlier by Alan WB9JTK of some countries who will continue to allow land base (fixed) and mobile two way (commercial and government) radio communications on a primary basis from 7.100 to 7.200 MHz.

    That means amateur radio would be a secondary user in that band.

    I notice Australia is on the list.

    That means amateur radio stations in Australia are the secondary users of 7.1 to 7.2 MHz. (In Australia amateur radio has been the secondary user of 7.100 to 7.300 MHz)

    In other words Australian amateur radio stations cannot complain about interference from non-amateur radio fix and mobile commercial and government users who are primary users licensed to use 7.100 to 7.200 MHz or licensed broadcasters who are the primary users from 7.200 to 7.300 MHz.

    In Australia we have had 7. 000 to 7.300 MHz with 7.000 to 7.100 being exclusive to hams for many years however in all the years that hams have been secondary I have never heard non-amateur radio 2 way communications between 7.100 to 7.200 MHz. (When visiting Somalia I have heard USB non-amateur radio two way communication in the 7 MHz band).

    In Australia I have only heard broadcast stations from 7.100 to 7.300 MHz.

    I notice Radio New Zealand has moved above 7.200 MHz and Radio Australia is also above 7.200 MHz.

    It is possible that hams in Australia and New Zealand might become primary users from 7.000 to 7.200 MHz with the secondary classification being restricted to 7.200 to 7.300 MHz which amateur radio in Australia and New Zealand will continue to share with our broadcasting friends at Radio Australia, Radio New Zealand etc.

    There are 2 countries on the list from the post above from Alan WB9JTK allowing base and mobile (commercial and government) communication from 7.100 to 7.200 MHz on a secondary basis.
    That means that those secondary fixed and mobile (commercial and government) two way communications stations cannot complain about interference from the primary user.

    In most countries the primary user will now become amateur radio.

    The result for amateur radio stations in all the countries that had 7.000 to 7.300 MHz before 29 March 2009 is that we should notice more clear frequencies from 7.100 to 7.200 MHz and indeed that has been the case here in Sydney, Australia.

    It’s been great to talk with hams in Europe and the Canary Islands (off West Africa) from 7.000 to 7.200 MHz.

    Previously all Europe, Asia and Africa (except Somalia) were limited from 7.000 to 7.100 MHz.

    On 7 MHz the bottom 40 kHz was used for Morse code and digital communications leaving only 60 kHz for voice communications.

    It was sometimes hard to find a clear spot from 7.000 to 7.100 MHz when the DX (long distance) was in especially for those living in Europe where the 100 Khz from 7.000 to 7.100 MHz was very crowded.

    Now European amateur radio stations can use 7.000 to 7.200 MHz.

    73,
    Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A
    Email somaliahamradio@yahoo.com
    Website https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2009
  16. NW7US

    NW7US Ham Member QRZ Page

    AM Radio - Webpage

    I decided to start my own AM operating webpage - http://amradio.org - come by and check it out... a work in progress.

    I've done some AM operation on 160 and 80. I need to rework my antenna system now that Spring is coming in. The 80 is down, and 160 is non-existant. Big project to repair!

    My AM equipment is meager, too. But I still enjoy the mode.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2009
  17. WA3VJB

    WA3VJB Ham Member QRZ Page

    Hope to work you on the air soon.
    We are having fun !!!
    See:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNtIzVm6lZY





     
  18. LU6EDC

    LU6EDC Ham Member QRZ Page

    Gracias amigo Sam...pse answerme

    Gracias amigo Sam... entiendo que las Boadcasting se han corrido de Frec. de 7100 a 7200 up. if it s correct pse answerme..ok??...
    Sory but my english is bad... if you have a some spanish friend for my question i re very funny...

    Tnx 73 David
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2009
  19. VK2BVS

    VK2BVS Ham Member QRZ Page

    Usted tiene inglés muy bueno.

    Hola David LU6EDC La Argentina,

    You have very good english.

    Sí la mayoría de los locutores en 7.100 que los 7.200 megaciclos se han movido a la nueva venda de difusión en 7.200 a 7.600 megaciclos.

    73 de Sydney, Australia,
    Sam Voron VK2BVS, 6O0A
    Email somaliahamradio@yahoo.com
    Website https://sites.google.com/site/somaliahamradio
     
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