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ex-K1MAN is SK

Discussion in 'Amateur Radio News' started by W1YW, May 15, 2017.

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  1. N4GKS

    N4GKS Ham Member QRZ Page

    When did that trash go sk?
     
  2. K7JOE

    K7JOE Ham Member QRZ Page


    Yes. Why on earth would I choose to run an organization that I find has zero merit and do not believe needs to exist. It certainly did not represent me nor my opinion on ham matters over the past three decades that I've been a ham. So why on earth would I bother to spend one millisecond running it.. I am not an ARRL member - have not been for over 25 years. I'm an accomplished ham and learned by getting on the air and emulating the best operators that I could find. That's how to learn. It takes time. Doesn't happen in a weekend with a Gordy NOA ARRL test booklet.

    Even QST magazine is a disgrace. Full of ads and no real content. Long gone are the real technical writers. Compare today's articles to a QST from 1985-1995. Night and day difference. Everything in QST today has been on the internet for months if not years before it shows up in QST. What a total waste of trees...

    Anyone heading to Xenia today heard the jackasses on the talk in frequency. Same as 7200. What utter idiocy. Bet mr jammer is a no code .. perhaps extra lite.

    net control ops today suffer from either some slow senility caused by age or more likely just lack on air experience running a proper control net. No radio skills. Why? Blame Dave and the ARRL ... they pushed for cb to Extra in a day. Their approach fails to help prepare hams to go beyond their baofeng $20 ht and "now you're talking and sound like an imbecile" test booklet.


    It's totally obvious to anyone who was a ham prior to the demise of the CW requirements.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2017
  3. KW0U

    KW0U Ham Member QRZ Page

    Actually Part 97.113(iv) was clearly written with the ARRL code broadcasts in mind. Personally I've enjoyed them for practice, but I agree the League has made some very questionable decisions over the years. The thing with Baxter was, he didn't even try to be a good neighbor. I will say some of his broadcasts (and that is what he was doing) were interesting, and I did get an SWL QSL from him. But he was misusing the hobby. Maybe it comes down to the difference between an institution and an individual, uncomfortable as that can be.
     
    WF9Q likes this.
  4. W1RC

    W1RC Ham Member QRZ Page

    Back to the original topic of this discussion.

    In a nutshell, Glenn was bagged for unattended station operation. His real sins were, of course, he was a pain in the ass. Glenn was assessed a forfeiture (fine), was able to have it reduced but refused to pay up. The FCC rejected his application for renewal because he had an outstanding debt.

    I knew Glenn personally. He wasn't a bad guy back in the day but in the mid-1980s he got into a dispute with the QST advertising manager over his classified ads advertising his Collins Radio repair services. Glenn made his living doing this. He claimed to be a "former Collins engineer" which in itself wasn't totally false but was misleading because he worked for a short time in their computer division and had nothing to do with RF whatsoever. Regardless it was because of his unclear pricing policies that QST refused to run his ads.

    Them came the lawsuits. Contrary to the myth Glenn was not an attorney nor a wealthy man. He and his wife lived modestly on his family's forme summer place in Belgrade Lakes Maine, a beautiful spot.

    Glenn used the courts to settle disputes that could have easily been resolved with a phone call. He lost cases many times because of procedural defects, Glenn even sued a neighboring girls camp over some stacked cordwood. He was a classic example of the old maxim: "he who defends himself has a fool for a client".

    He also ran afoul of the Maine Department of Education because he was calling his academic institution a "university."

    His IARN broadcasts were made using a venerable Collins KW-1 AM transmitter. Despite thenfact that he was a "former Collins engineer" it was another well-known AMer who redesigned his audio. Then came the IARN "bulletin" broadcasts and his notoriety. It was clear that Glenn was using his "bulletins" to battle with the League. His first mistake, in my opinion, was his choice of frequency. His second mistake was challenging the authority of the FCC and personally attacking Riley Hollimgsworth, K4ZFH, who was at the time in charge of Amateur enforcement.

    When the FCC inspected his station they found it transmitting unattended. That was the beginning of the end for K1MAN. Glenn was able to remain in the air because he kept the case pending in the courts and through administrative action but in the end he finally lost and his application for renewal was rejected.

    I understand K1MAN is now assigned to someone in NY.

    More details on Glenn Baxter may be found here:

    http://k1manthefool.blogspot.com/

    However now that Glenn has passed away all I can say was he was an interesting individual. When I knew him he was very hospitable to me and I found him very entertaining. That was in the 1970s and early 1980s. I did not have any contact with him after that.

    May he Rest In Peace.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2017
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  5. WB9YTG

    WB9YTG Ham Member QRZ Page

    Will his estate still have to pay the $10,000 fine the FCC levied against him?
     
  6. W4HM

    W4HM Ham Member QRZ Page

    First of all I want to welcome KN0DE into the hamateur radio ranks. It's a great hobby with many facets and operate the aspects that you personally enjoy. Also ignore the curmudgeons which I think you already do.

    Secondly I never knew or worked K1MAN and hold no pleasure in hearing that he became an SK earlier this month. He really did dislike the ARRL (I do too but I'm a member) and started his own competing organization but had little success with it. He did transmit daily bulletins just like the ARRL did/does but I think that what got him into trouble with the FCC was his transmitting information considered to be of pecuniary interest, a big no no.

    The other hamateur that ran into trouble with the FCC was Herb Schoenbohm KV4FZ on St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands who frequented 14.313 mc in the 1990's. In my opinion it would be very unfair to put KV4FZ into the same bad guy category as K1MAN. Herb is a very good CW operator, DXer, contester and all around good guy. I don't know Herb personally and have never had an eyeball QSO with him but I've worked him many times over the years on 160 meters.

    I've been a hamateur radio operator since 1989 and passed the 20 wpm code test in 1991. It wasn't that hard for me because I had already learned CW beginning in 1965 as an SWL and had been listening to commercial CW utility stations as well as hamateurs for many years on CW. I'm proud to have passed the 20 wpm CW exam like K7JOE but I have never let it inflate my hamateur radio ego or lead me to look down on others that haven't, couldn't pass it. I think that this post is the first time that I've ever mentioned passing the 20 wpm code test.

    I never had to draw out a Colpitts or Hartley oscillator diagram or pass a "non" multiple choice test at the nearest FCC office because it was no longer required when I decided to get my ticket. Nor is it the fault of a new Extra class operator that the 20 wpm code test or any speed code test is no longer required. And recently I've looked at the latest Extra class exam pool and contrary to what I've seen posted here on QRZ and elsewhere it's not easy to rote memorize the question pool.

    But I have heard quite a few new General and Extra class operators repeatedly ask really shockingly stupid questions on the air and also use CB lingo like 10-4, S20, have roger beeps, terrible audio, etc. And when one politely in the Elmer tradition tries to help them become better operators they respond in a very negative hostile manner.

    Yes some (maybe many) long licensed General, Advanced and Extra class radio operators do act like psychopaths on the air and in social media venues such as here on QRZ but in my personal observation and research most of the real crazies on the air including on 7.200 mc did not pass a code test. And they have no respect for the hobby or themselves.

    But is it a dumbed down testing process or general societal devolving problem?
     
    K2MOB likes this.
  7. W4HM

    W4HM Ham Member QRZ Page

    First of all I want to welcome KN0DE into the hamateur radio ranks. It's a great hobby with many facets and operate the aspects that you personally enjoy. Also ignore the curmudgeons which I think you already do.

    Secondly I never knew or worked K1MAN and hold no pleasure in hearing that he became an SK earlier this month. He really did dislike the ARRL (I do too but I'm a member) and started his own competing organization but had little success with it. He did transmit daily bulletins just like the ARRL did/does but I think that what got him into trouble with the FCC was his transmitting information considered to be of pecuniary interest, a big no no.

    The other hamateur that ran into trouble with the FCC was Herb Schoenbohm KV4FZ on St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands who frequented 14.313 mc in the 1990's. In my opinion it would be very unfair to put KV4FZ into the same bad guy category as K1MAN. Herb is a very good CW operator, DXer, contester and all around good guy. I don't know Herb personally and have never had an eyeball QSO with him but I've worked him many times over the years on 160 meters.

    I've been a hamateur radio operator since 1989 and passed the 20 wpm code test in 1991. It wasn't that hard for me because I had already learned CW beginning in 1965 as an SWL and had been listening to commercial CW utility stations as well as hamateurs for many years on CW. I'm proud to have passed the 20 wpm CW exam like K7JOE but I have never let it inflate my hamateur radio ego or lead me to look down on others that haven't, couldn't pass it. I think that this post is the first time that I've ever mentioned passing the 20 wpm code test.

    I never had to draw out a Colpitts or Hartley oscillator diagram or pass a "non" multiple choice test at the nearest FCC office because it was no longer required when I decided to get my ticket. Nor is it the fault of a new Extra class operator that the 20 wpm code test or any speed code test is no longer required. And recently I've looked at the latest Extra class exam pool and contrary to what I've seen posted here on QRZ and elsewhere it's not easy to rote memorize the question pool.

    But I have heard quite a few new General and Extra class operators repeatedly ask really shockingly stupid questions on the air and also use CB lingo like 10-4, S20, have roger beeps, terrible audio, etc. And when one politely in the Elmer tradition tries to help them become better operators they respond in a very negative hostile manner.

    Yes some (maybe many) long licensed General, Advanced and Extra class radio operators do act like psychopaths on the air and in social media venues such as here on QRZ but in my personal observation and research most of the real crazies on the air including on 7.200 mc did not pass a code test. And they have no respect for the hobby or themselves.

    But is it a dumbed down testing process or general societal devolving problem?
     
    K4KKQ, AC5RH, W6NYA and 1 other person like this.
  8. K2UM

    K2UM Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Thomas (W4HM),

    My compliments on everything about your post ... what it says, its balance and the care with which it was written. I got my first ticket in 1959 as a Novice and then later a General (yep, at the FCC regional office in Detroit, Michigan) and then had a long layoff from the hobby along the way (Military service, grad school, marriage, family ... everyone knows the drill). I had to retest in the late 80s-early 90 for all license classes. I've seen changes in the hobby as with all things in life. Some I approve of and some I don't. I do agree with one of your hypothetical assertions at the end ... I think we are seeing a larger change in societal norms and expectations, many of which concern me a great deal.

    In the end, this is a hobby and some like to make it about something much larger than that. I have flown for many years and I run across some of the same "I had it tougher than you" syndrome in that hobby (saw it in military aviation as well). I think it is a part of the human condition for some reason.

    I welcome all the new blood and worried for a good while that, like me, the hobby was "grading" quickly and wondered about how long this hobby could sustain itself. At the same time, I also am concerned about some of the expectations being brought into the hobby by SOME of the new blood. Like many, I have wondered many times why a few cannot read a manual, don't understand the manual, or don't want to learn about how it works and why it works. But, maybe I am showing that I also not immune to "being an old guy" with a narrower mind then I should have.

    Anyway, Thomas, that was a fine piece. And, this is only my second post about anything on QRZ.com since I have been a member since its earliest days.

    Thanks, again.
    Greg K2UM
     
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  9. K2UM

    K2UM Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Well .. I needed to take more "care" in my posting ... "grading quickly" was supposed to be "graying quickly" ... I could blame auto-correct, but I won't! ;)

    Greg K2UM
     
  10. K5XS

    K5XS Ham Member QRZ Page

    Joe,

    I agree QST is "full of ads," but I think that's a great thing. I enjoy scanning them and seeing what's new and what's available. I also take heart knowing there is advertising revenue coming in to the ARRL.

    And I respectfully disagree with your notion that "QST magazine is a disgrace" or that it has "no real content."

    I'm thumbing the June edition that just showed up in my mailbox. It starts with a great six-page illustrated article on lightning protection. A five-page article on the Amateur Radio Emergency Data Network is next, followed by a two-page article on 6-meter polar sporadic E propagation. Next is a four-page piece on constructing a 80-6 meter rhombic antenna. Then comes a three-band coupled-resonator dipole project. There's also an in-depth review of a new Yaesu transceiver, an article on a new Raspberry Pi controller, a couple of other equipment reviews, a pretty good Q&A piece on why UHF connector splices affect impedance more than loss and on how foilage affects RF. Then comes a great technical piece on how PC-board traces behave as inductors, followed by some Field Day operating-focused articles.

    You obviously disagree, but I think QST is a great magazine for hams.
     

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