Dual Band vs Single Band

Discussion in 'Discussions, Opinions & Editorials' started by W4CDW, Aug 31, 2012.

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  1. W4CDW

    W4CDW Ham Member QRZ Page

    73 to all!

    Needing an opinion question mainly. I have posted the same to my local ham club members and will see what they say, but I would like a more broad opinion. So right now I live in Chattanooga, TN. I have a 2m/440 base station and a dual band HT, and now I am wanting a mobile unit. Now my 70cm repeaters are actually pretty dead around here. Only times they are used is early mornings during commuting, and usually they are weak signals on off repeater frequencies, or when the local ARES net switches over for a few minutes. My local nets are all on the 2m band. I do not do much traveling, and when I do I go to Atlanta to visit family. Down there their 70cm are dead also. But I mainly listen to my grandfathers HF rig anyway.

    Now I told you all this to ask this question, is spending the extra money for a dual bander worth it? I mainly rag chew, and just always carrying my HT around is a little annoying and depending where Im at in town, I can't hit certain repeaters.

    Any thoughts?

    73,
    Brandon, W4CDW
     
  2. NA0AA

    NA0AA Ham Member QRZ Page

    I don't know, if most of your nets on UHF are from your home QTH, then yea, maybe a single band will do for ya.

    MY problem is putting a non-detachable face place radio in most of my small cars, The room for the full box just is not around as much as it used to be, and sadly, the single banders tend to be single piece.

    But if that limitation is not a problem, sounds like you don't REALLY need a dual band.

    There are parts of the country where dual or even quad band FM rigs can be used.
     
  3. KC6KNL

    KC6KNL Ham Member QRZ Page

    Hello Brandon

    I used a Dual Band HT for almost two years. It worked well.

    When you switch to a Mobile Dual Band radio, you will be able to hold a repeater for a longer time, when driving.

    Depending on your location to a repeater, you will be full quieting, more so, and you will have strong audio.

    Try to get a Dual Band with detachable face plate and able to be programmed via PC Cable. Ii switched from an Icom IC-W32A dual band HT to an Icom IC-207H. Dual Band mobile Radio. It has a single VFO so you CAN'T listen to two frequencies at same time. Great audio and signal.

    Another thing, look at 220 as another Band to consider. It is being called the Gentlemen's Band. If you are open to considering 220, then check out the TYT TH-9000 mobile rig on Amazon.

    For 220, there is an Atlanta repeater, 224.340- 146.2 PL that has activity from 7a-7:30a.

    When you come down to Atlanta, get on 146.880- with 100.0 PL. I am on this repeater during 7a-9a drive time. Also the Jasper repeater on 146.805+ 100.0 PL is very good in coverage. You can probably talk on this repeater from GA/TN border down to Atlanta.

    When you get on 146.880, ask for me on it. Steve KC6KNL.

    73s

    Steve
     
  4. KC9UDX

    KC9UDX Subscriber QRZ Page

    You could get a dual bander and find someone to get on 70cm and ragchew with. Lighting up a repeater is a good way to get others interested in using it.
     
  5. WA4OTD

    WA4OTD XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    I think you are ready for HF rig! I think you answered your own question on dual band radio. Several radios cover HF/VHF/UHF and could be very useful.
     
  6. WA7KKP

    WA7KKP Ham Member QRZ Page

    First time anyone ever said "Goodbye" or "So Long" to me when starting a conversation.

    Gary WA7KKP
     
  7. KD3NE

    KD3NE Ham Member QRZ Page

    You have a Dual Band HT ?

    Why not get a Dual-Band mobile that is fully capable dual band.

    One that does " crossband repeat "

    You couple put the HT on a 70cm frequency, the mobile in your car on the same 70cm frequency for the 70cm side, and the 2 meter repeater frequency on the 2 meter side.

    You could then use the HT to connect with the two meter repeater through your mobile which is acting as a repeater for you.

    I used mine like that when the HT just wasn't enough to hit the repeaters.


    When it comes to buying gear I tend to go overboard using this mentality ......

    " It is better to have the capability and not need it, then it is to need the capability it and not have it! "



    .
     
  8. W7WST

    W7WST Ham Member QRZ Page

    Since when did 73 mean either so long or goodbye?

    Don
     
  9. N2ADV

    N2ADV Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    Actually, I have had a number of European Hams start off conversations with "73 to you"... As far as I knew, it never meant "goodbye" or "so long," rather, "best wishes" which isn't necessarily a closing...

    To the OP, my dad (KB2GUA now SK) always taught me that it is better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it. :)
     
  10. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    So long, farewell, Auf Wiedersehen, Adieu!
     
  11. KY5U

    KY5U Ham Member QRZ Page

    73 is like Aloha. A greeting and a goodbye.
     
  12. KC9UDX

    KC9UDX Subscriber QRZ Page

    But "get lost" only works at the end, and "get found" doesn't work at all.
     
  13. K0RGR

    K0RGR Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    There are no analog UHF repeaters here in Bugtussle, but I still recommend dualband radios, because just to our north there are lots of active UHF machines in the Twin Cities, and to our west, one of the highest level wide coverage machines in the state is on UHF. To our east, there is a huge network of linked UHF repeaters that cover Wisconsin (also called the WIN network, but not to be confused with WIN out west). If a person never leaves home, then it's probably not that big a deal. But the difference of $1-200 spread over the time you will own the radio, and the convenience of being able to remote the control head probably makes the second band worthwhile.
     
  14. N3PZ

    N3PZ XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    I just bought a single band mobile and exchanged it for a dual band the next day. Several reasons - i really like the public safety activities which the Yaesu dual band supports. I have started to hit the amateur radio satellites which is alot of fun and not hard or expensive to do. I also do not want to regret not having the dual band if I need it down the road. I am glad I made the switch.
     
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