ARRL and AM. minute #64, July 19-20, 2002

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by W0TDH, Aug 15, 2002.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
ad: L-HROutlet
ad: l-rl
ad: Left-2
ad: L-MFJ
ad: MessiPaoloni-1
ad: Left-3
ad: Subscribe
  1. kk7jk

    kk7jk Banned QRZ Page

    KD7KOY, I'm sadened by your list of heart stoppers.
    You failed to mention my articles and comments regarding: Illegals, Unlicensed idiots operating on 10 meters.
    I'm just so unpopular on qrz.com it stirs me up.
     
  2. KE7VE

    KE7VE Banned QRZ Page

    Bud,

    What is your problem?

    Don't you know how to listen to what someone is thinking, rather than what they are saying.

    I have this same disability.....it's why I'm not an ARRL member........can't handle the stress of people expecting me to know what they are thinking and ignore what they have said.

    73, Marty K7RKR
     
  3. W0TDH

    W0TDH Ham Member QRZ Page

    Is this the type of digital equipment the ARRL is referring to even though they failed to say digital Modes in minute 64 ?


    Has this equipment been approved as yet ?

    Do the Rules have to change inorder to use this equipment ?  If so, why ? (BIG BUSINESS INTERESTS...??? )

    http://www.tapr.org/tapr/dv/index.html



    [Digital Voice at the Dayton


    ICOM D-Star Concept Radio Demonstrated at Dayton Hamvention 2002

    ICOM introduces the next generation digital amateur radio system – the D-STAR system. The D-STAR system provides digitally modulated voice/data communication and high-speed data access over the air. This project has been developed in collaboration with JARL (Japan Amateur Radio League) and is supported by the Japanese Telecommunications Administration. ICOM has begun field tests on D-STAR ]

    [ Moderator: Doug Smith, KF6DX, ARRL - History of digital voice modes; goals, advantages and disadvantages of digital voice; voice-quality evaluation; CVSD systems; overview of current techniques. ]

    Tom - K0PJG
    Life Member A.R.R.L.
     
  4. KD7KOY

    KD7KOY Ham Member QRZ Page

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (kk7jk @ Aug. 29 2002,11:56)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">KD7KOY, I'm sadened by your list of heart stoppers.
    You failed to mention my articles and comments regarding: Illegals, Unlicensed idiots operating on 10 meters.
    I'm just so unpopular on qrz.com it stirs me up.[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>


    Sorry OM. I will add it to my list. Gross oversight on my part..
     
  5. K2PG

    K2PG Ham Member QRZ Page

    </span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (K0PJG @ Aug. 28 2002,17:29)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">ICOM introduces the next generation digital amateur radio system – the D-STAR system. The D-STAR system provides digitally modulated voice/data communication and high-speed data access over the air. This project has been developed in collaboration with JARL (Japan Amateur Radio League) and is supported by the Japanese Telecommunications Administration.[/QUOTE]<span id='postcolor'>
    Have any of you, League officials included, ever wondered why this new technique was developed by JAPANESE, rather than American amateurs and why the JARL and not the ARRL was involved in the development of this protocol? Have any of you wondered why the experimenters using OFDM for voice communications on HF are British and not American, even though OFDM was developed in New Jersey by Bell Laboratories (now Lucent Technology)? Could it be the straitjacket of rules and regulations in Sections 97.305, 97.307, and 97.309 that deters Americans from doing such experiments? Section 97.305 prescribes our outdated emission subbands. The other two sections dictate emission characteristics, such as digital codes, bandwidth, and baud rates.

    The nascent proposals by the ARRL do nothing to eliminate this overregulation and micromanagement of the Amateur Radio Service in this country. While substituting bandwidth for emission type as a means of defining subbands, the problem with this proposal is that it still prescribes subbands! When are we going to join the rest of the world in eliminating these asinine subband regulations? The United States loves to strut in front of the rest of the world, proclaiming itself to be the &quot;land of the free&quot;. Yet our amateur radio regulations prove otherwise.

    Mr. Haynie, before you get on your high horse and attack me for &quot;League-bashing&quot; and &quot;trying this case in the press&quot;, please take a look at some of your organization's own publications. The article about OFDM appeared last year in QEX, the League's magazine for experimenters. Do some listening on the HF bands, making sure to tune through the wasted, &quot;American-free&quot; zones caused by our government-mandated bandplans being out of step with the voluntary bandplans used in the rest of the world. Pay special attention to the segments 3530-3750 kHz, 14.100-14.150 MHz, and 21.100-21.200 MHz, asking yourself if this is efficient use of precious HF spectrum, especially after listening to the congestion in the 3800-4000 kHz or 14.200-14.350 MHz segments. Then talk to your directors about petitioning for true deregulation by asking the FCC to delete Sections 97.305, 97.307, and 97.309 from the Rules, substituting the liberal frequency allocation and emission guidelines of Part 5 (the Experimental Radio Service, in which the League also holds a license as WA2XSY). It isn't 1937 anymore. We don't need this straitjacket of regulations that is strangling amateur radio, helping to make it into a &quot;plug and play&quot; appliance operator copy of CB. Advancement of the state of the art should come from the inventiveness of our own amateur radio operators, freed from the shackles of overregulation. It should not be driven by the amount of additional advertising space that can be sold in QST and other publications.

    Phil Galasso
    K2PG and experimental KA2XUK
     
  6. KB1GYQ

    KB1GYQ Ham Member QRZ Page

    K2PG: I agree, the world is passing us by. Take packet radio as another example, many &quot;backward&quot; parts of the world are running 56K and better, here we are often stuck with 1200 baud. It's no wonder the kids want to play with the computers instead of radio! Part 15 gets to run almost any mode they like, within power limits; but the amateurs who are supposed to be pushing the leading edge are mandated to use 30 year old technology.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page