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807's

Discussion in 'Ham Radio Discussions' started by W4JJA, Dec 21, 2013.

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  1. WN2SQC

    WN2SQC Ham Member QRZ Page

    In the 60's I had a Bogen public address audio amp that used a pair of 807's.
     
  2. K8JD

    K8JD Ham Member QRZ Page

    The first homebrew rig I buit had a 6AG7 osc and an 807 PA. It didn't work so I built a single 6AQ5 and it did.
    I used old parts salvaged from discarded radios and TVs.
    When I got my General ticket I had a WW2 surplus ARC5 that had the 12 Volt version 1625 tubes in it (and a VFO).
    My first "made-for-hams" rig was a Globe Cheif 90 and it had an 807 final.
     
  3. K9STH

    K9STH Platinum Subscriber Volunteer Moderator Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    JD:

    Actually, the WRL Globe Chief 90, like the Globe Chief 90A, had a pair of 807s in the final. The only differences in the transmitters was that the Globe Chief 90A had a "shadow cabinet" in that the top of the cabinet overhangs about 0.5-inches instead of being flush with the panel and the later versions of the 90A had a plastic housed moving vane meter instead of the metal housed moving vane meter.

    The circuitry of the transmitters is very simple, a 6AG7 oscillator into a pair of 807s in the final. The finals double for 10-meter operation which reduces the power quite a bit.

    The 90 and 90A have 160-meters whereas the "Globe Chief Deluxe" dropped the 160-meter position as well as having a completely different cabinet. But, the basic circuit was still the same.

    Glen, K9STH
     
  4. WA9SVD

    WA9SVD Ham Member QRZ Page

    I had a 6 Meter amp that used 1625's back in the late 60's. They were essentially 807's, but besides the 12 Volt filament, they used a different base, so they weren't directly interchangeable. Mil Surplus 1625's from WWII/Korean conflict era were about $0.50 each, far cheaper than 807's.
     
  5. WB2WIK

    WB2WIK Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    Only 807 rig I've ever owned was a Johnson Adventurer.

    Not a bad CW rig, but that panel meter! It bounced and bounced and bounced. Thankfully to tune up I had an outboard SWR meter and I'd just tune for maximum forward power, because if I waited for the Adventurer meter to settle down to "dip the plate current," that would have taken more time than I had the patience for.

    I don't think I've ever had any other rig using an 807.

    Never homebrewed anything with one, either. This is a tube that's quite a lot older than I am, and they were still "cheap" in the mid-60s when I got licensed and started homebrewing stuff, so was the 6146 which is a somewhat better tube.

    1625s were $0.25/each new in boxes on Radio Row in NYC (WW2 surplus stuff), but I didn't use any of those, either.

    1625 wasn't just an 807 with a different filament, there was an internal connection that made them not usable for GG service, but it's been so long I forgot what the fix was for that. I do recall there was some sort of fix and it was published in magazines in the 50s. Should go look that up when I have nothing to do, which is never.:p
     
  6. N2EY

    N2EY Premium Subscriber QRZ Page

    I use a rig with 807s. Today - and it's not a nostalgia rig nor a retro thing. It's my main HF transceiver, the latest in a long line of homebrew rigs going back 46 years.

    The rig I use today was built in the mid-1990s and uses a pair of 807s in the final at full ICAS Class C ratings. 150 watts DC input, about 100 watts RF output. It is a CW-only, all-hollow-state transceiver of original design. Picture on my profile page.

    Its immediate predecessor was a similar CW transceiver built in the early 1980s, using the same heterodyne scheme as the Heath SB rigs. Pair of 807s in that one too.

    Before that, (late 1970s) I had a separate transmitter-receiver setup with VFO/6AG7-2x807. Before that, a simple MOPA rig running a single 807 at 40 watts. In the early 1970s, some rigs using 1625s (807 with 12 volt heater and 7 pin Medium base). The very first rig I had with an 807 was the Johnson Viking Adventurer.

    I've had other rigs - manufactured, kit, surplus, restorations, and homebrew. But my 807/1625 rigs outnumber them all.

    If you work me on the air, you're almost certainly hearing the rig in the pictures.
     
  7. KA4DPO

    KA4DPO Platinum Subscriber Platinum Subscriber QRZ Page

    I almost forgot about those. My Johnson Ranger uses a pair of 1625's in the modulator. I recall when they were like you said, really inexpensive. Not any more. A pair of 1625's can set you back $50.00 or more.

    Even 807's are no longer cheap, lucky for me I have four brand new ones so I guess I'm pretty well set for those.
     
  8. M0SVB

    M0SVB Ham Member QRZ Page

    My Elizabethan uses two 807's, and when I finally get around to building it, the 75W modulator will use another two. I've still got 5 or 6 good RCA 807's I bought in the 1960's.
     
  9. SM0AOM

    SM0AOM Ham Member QRZ Page

    My "shack" contains five transmitters with 807's, one Geloso G210TR CW/AM using the quite common 4/101 VFO,
    one VFO-Buffer-Driver-PA with 2x807 in the PA, one CO-PA with a single 807, one CO-PA with 2x807 and finally one Geloso VFO 4/102-based CW/AM with 2x807 in the PA stage and 2x807 in the modulator.

    The ARC-5 transmitters using 2x1625 are not counted here.

    Some dumpster diving at a previous employer netted a lifetime supply of spare 807's

    73/
    Karl-Arne
    SM0AOM
     
  10. WA8ZYT

    WA8ZYT Ham Member QRZ Page

    Steve, I remember that mod. We used to have a GG amp at our high school radio club, that used 8-1625's. I remember the tube base was ground out with a wheel grinder, and wire was lifted and re soldered, if I remember correctly. That was over 45 years ago, I am surprised I remember that!
     
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