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View Full Version : FCC Part 97 rules clarification please.



AA7EJ
03-10-2012, 03:02 AM
I am aware that it is not necessary to append anything to my callsign when I am operating from location different than what is on my ticket.
But if I WANT to identify my operation , what is proper / legal way to do it?

For example - if I am using ARC-5 on board of B-17 bomber
can I legally identify as “stroke B-17” ?

Can that be considered as tactical callsign?

I did not find anything about it in Part 97.

73 Vaclav

KG4NEL
03-10-2012, 03:06 AM
I've always just used "/portable" and then mentioned the special event, if it was one.

NI7I
03-10-2012, 03:16 AM
This would be the last place I would go for a rules clarification. I'm sure you will get a lkot of opinions. Most of them will be inacurate. why not
ask.... lets see... the FCC.. They might have an answer that is fairly close..

I wont offer my opinion. It would be worth about..... nothing..

lee
NI7I

K7MH
03-10-2012, 03:46 AM
I would go with common sense and the more conventional way of identifying.
K7MH/B17 would be neither.
It could fall into the callsign block for China or at least misinterpreted in a way that it could.
The last thing you want to do as a special events station is look sort of lid-ish, confuse or alienate people, or give them any reason to heckle or QRM you.
It is going to be more of a challenge to ID yourself as a special event station on CW in a way that people will know what is going on.

NO2A
03-10-2012, 04:37 AM
If you`re in 7 land you could identify AA7EJ/7 as being portable. If you signed /b that would mean a beacon station. True,it would be confusing for a special event station on cw,most work phone.

WM5Q
03-10-2012, 04:46 AM
The call prefix of the location you're temporarily operating from would be appended after the stroke (or in a few countries, prepended before your call). E.g., if operating from Hawaii, /KH6. In another US call district, just the number could be appended, e.g. /6 for California. It was once necessary in the US to identify any operation of the station from a location other than the given primary station location on the license this way; this requirement was removed some decades ago. I believe it was also required to give the nearest major city, and possibly even your distance from it, when identifying a portable station.

It's a relatively recent informal convention to append other things to a station identification like /m for mobile, /p for portable, /b for beacon, /QRP, etc. While not part of the legal identification of the station (at least in the US), these meanings are well understood and accepted. /B17, on the other hand, most would interpret to mean you are transmitting from China, and if a B17 call district exists, I'm not sure if your station identification would be legal since it suggests you're transmitting from a country you're not under some special arrangement you don't have. It's the same as me identifying my portable operation on a Piece-of-Junk Twoer by appending the PJ2 designator.

WY5V
03-10-2012, 05:44 AM
The proper way for you to identify when operating from a B17 would be to sign:

This is AA7EJ/Hey! I'm operating on board a frickin' B17!

PE1RDW
03-10-2012, 11:48 AM
So what is wrong with just using the original /AM asuming the plane is flying?

W0LPQ
03-10-2012, 02:17 PM
/AM could be construed as Aeronautical Mobile .. which he is not. Just mobile air ... maybe air mobile. He is within the continental limits which /AM is wrong.

However, I agree with I7I, ask the FCC ... not hard to do.

K9STH
03-10-2012, 04:34 PM
RDW:

Using the suffixes AM or MM, or identifying on phone as "aeronautical mobile" or "maritime mobile" is, according to the ITU, only allowed when the aircraft is over international waters or the ship/boat is in international waters. Otherwise, the suffix M, or identifying on phone as "mobile", is to be used.

Within the jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commission, identifying as "portable" or "mobile" is no longer required by stations holding FCC licenses.

With the exception of Canadian stations, all foreign amateur radio operators operating under reciprocal agreements MUST add a prefix indicating the location including the call area. That is, for example, a foreign station operating in Texas would identify as W5/ and then their call sign. The agreement with Canada is different. A Canadian station is to identify with their call sign first and then the suffix indicating the United States call area. This per 47 CFR Part 97 Section 97.119(g) which reads as follows:


(g) When the station is transmitting under the authority of §97.107 of this part, an indicator consisting of the appropriate letter-numeral designating the station location must be included before the call sign that was issued to the station by the country granting the license. For an amateur service license granted by the Government of Canada, however, the indicator must be included after the call sign. At least once during each intercommunication, the identification announcement must include the geographical location as nearly as possible by city and state, commonwealth or possession.


In the "goode olde dayes", in the areas under the control of the FCC, a mobile amateur radio station had to not only identify as "mobile", had to indicate the call area in which the station was operating, but had to also identify the location at the time of the transmission. If within the city limits of a city, then the name of that city had to be given. If outside a city, then the distance (in miles) and the direction from the city had to be given. For example, "17.5 miles southeast of Podunk, Iowa" would be given if Podunk, Iowa, was 17.5 miles northwest of the mobile station. Such were the identification requirements when I was first licensed in 1959. Gradually, the FCC eliminated portions of these requirements until, finally, there was no longer a requirement to even say that you were mobile.

But, in a practical sense, if operating mobile, it is a good idea to identify as such because indicating that you are mobile can explain why your signal strength is widely varying, to let other stations know that (especially on VHF or UHF) you will not be "in range" for a long time, etc.

Glen, K9STH

NY3V
03-10-2012, 05:01 PM
Wut aboot on submarine under water? Iz dat /SM (Submarine Mobile) ? :D

AA7EJ
03-10-2012, 05:40 PM
Wut aboot on submarine under water? Iz dat /SM (Submarine Mobile) ? :D
I am sure you are aware that you would not be working any ham band then.
And I am not sure they let hams use the Jim Creek antenna in WA.
But you can inquire locally. HI HI HI
73 Vaclav

AA7EJ
03-10-2012, 05:48 PM
Thanks for all the replies.
The bottom line - do not do that, it was pretty stupid idea!
But I wonder why in EU I signed as OK/AA7EJ and in US I would have to sign AA7EJ/KH6.
I guess different country different custom. HI HI HI

73 Vaclav AA7EJ/5

PE1RDW
03-10-2012, 05:53 PM
Thanks for all the replies.
The bottom line - do not do that, it was pretty stupid idea!
But I wonder why in EU I signed as OK/AA7EJ and in US I would have to sign AA7EJ/KH6.
I guess different country different custom. HI HI HI

73 Vaclav AA7EJ/5

More differnt rulesets, when you are in the eu you use the cept rules, in the us you have other rules, btw if you hear someone with a european call putting the us prefix in front of their call when there they are not breaking the rules, cept rules apply for anyone opperating in another country under the cept agreement even if other agrements/rules are in place for non cept countries.

AA7EJ
03-10-2012, 06:17 PM
More differnt rulesets, when you are in the eu you use the cept rules, in the us you have other rules, btw if you hear someone with a european call putting the us prefix in front of their call when there they are not breaking the rules, cept rules apply for anyone opperating in another country under the cept agreement even if other agrements/rules are in place for non cept countries.

Andre,
thanks for the clarification.
I was really confused and tempted to sign as OK1/AA7EJ and actually got few OM's calling me that way. I belive I talked to US ham who signed as F5/.....

Which brings me to another subject.
“Worked” a fellow from down under who operated US rig, remotely, I think in TX.
He signed as VK6/N5.... and got me exited until he explained to me how he is operating from “ downtown Brisbane”.

KL7AJ
03-10-2012, 06:22 PM
Since time immemorial it seems that it's been like pulling teeth to get hams to ID (and now broadcasters) I don't know why hams jumped for joy when the FCC relaxed the 10 minute rules a few years back. I LIKE my call sign, and I like for folks to know where I'm from (or at). Never hurts to give more information than required.

This is KL7AJ fer the L o fit.

ND6M
03-10-2012, 07:31 PM
I am aware that it is not necessary to append anything to my callsign when I am operating from location different than what is on my ticket.
But if I WANT to identify my operation , what is proper / legal way to do it?

For example - if I am using ARC-5 on board of B-17 bomber
can I legally identify as “stroke B-17” ?

Can that be considered as tactical callsign?

I did not find anything about it in Part 97.73 Vaclav

try 97.119 (c) you can pretty much use anyself assigned indicator before or after a valid callsign provided a "/" or "slant" is used.

so,.................... if you want to id as "AA7EJ/ flyin around in a B-17",.... that is perfectly legal

K2NCC
03-10-2012, 08:17 PM
So long as you don't use a prefix that's designated to another service. For instance, technically, repeaters who identify ending with a slant-R are using the prefix for retired Russian navy (or something like that). So, K2NCC/R would be illegal, but so accepted, no one complains. I see folks use some of the oddest... like slant-100 to represent the year celebrating.

What it comes down to I think, is no one cares. Use what you want so long as it isn't illegal (and even then, no one cares.)

AA7EJ
03-10-2012, 08:32 PM
try 97.119 (c) you can pretty much use anyself assigned indicator before or after a valid callsign provided a "/" or "slant" is used.

so,.................... if you want to id as "AA7EJ/ flyin around in a B-17",.... that is perfectly legal

Thank you for rebuilding my faith in ham radio community. I was sure that somebody will find the answer somewhere, but was wavering in my conviction.
But I knew that esteemed US government agency likes FCC would have the subject covered , somewhere , but neglected to look in the most obvious place - station identification.

How embarrassing.

So, how is “ARC-5 / AA7EJ/ 5 / B-17”??

I think not. But it would be legal!

73 Vaclav

K2NCC
03-10-2012, 08:42 PM
I plan to operate aboard a submarine next summer and will use a special event station callsign. Not my own with a identifier at the end. Probably something used for similar in the past like K7SUB or such.

If you just get a new call for your event, you can drop the whole slant-whatever concern!

WW3QB
03-10-2012, 08:58 PM
You can get temporary 1x1 callsigns for your special event. The event does not even have to be that special.

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