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N8XYN
07-11-2011, 08:25 PM
I'm looking for a 6 meter cw only qrp kit (transmitter) for setting uo a beacon. I'v crused the web with no resaults, anything from 1 to 5 watts, anyone know of a source for such a device?

Please contact me at jimawhitaker@gmail.com

73's and thanks.

KC5FM
07-12-2011, 04:29 AM
I'm looking for a 6 meter cw only qrp kit (transmitter) for setting uo a beacon. I'v crused the web with no resaults, anything from 1 to 5 watts, anyone know of a source for such a device?


Google is your friend.

Top results lists links to 6-meter QRP transmitters. (http://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1CHKZ_enUS434US434&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=6-meter+beacon+QRP+transmitter)

73

N8XYN
07-12-2011, 10:48 AM
Ok, I followed your link and yes I'v been using computers since 1980 when you had to write your own software in machine language. I found lots of 10 meter and 6 meter beacons but not one kit such as a Ramsey or ten tec or vectronixm, you know something with a printed board bags of parts and a nice manual.

KM1H
07-12-2011, 03:17 PM
The MFJ 6M QRP transceivers can be found pretty cheap on the used market. Also see what FAR Circuits has available for boards.
http://www.farcircuits.net/

Carl

WB2WIK
07-12-2011, 04:54 PM
Frankly, if you have commercial (AC line) power available at the beacon site, I'd shoot for something that can run 10W output all day long, 24/7/365 and not have to think about it, such as a used Ameco TX-62 and a crystal for the beacon frequency.

It has a built-in AC power supply and can run 40W output on six meters, but is easily turned down to 20W or 10W if you wish. It's an AM-CW rig, which you'd be using in the "CW" mode. Very reliable, will run 10W output continuously, for years. Cheap nowadays, I see them going for under $100 all the time.

W1VT
07-14-2011, 06:52 PM
http://www.kangaus.com/6and2_meter_cw_source.htm
Kanga kits sells a 10mW VXO controlled signal source kit that can be used with a keyed amplifier to build a beacon.

6M kits are rare in the USA due to the tight FCC spectral purity requirements compared to what is needed at HF and UHF.

AC0FP
07-18-2011, 11:14 PM
Thanks for the idea. A 2 or 3 watt 10 or 6 meter CW beacon transmitter would be a good project to design in my retirement.

73,

fp

WB2WIK
07-18-2011, 11:54 PM
I wouldn't waste time, effort or money on this when I have now seen several TX-62s (did a search) for in the $35 range.

This is a 6m CW transmitter than can run from 1W to about 40W output (just dial it up) and has a built-in AC power supply and very good keying characteristics. Add one crystal and something to key it and you have a very reliable beacon with zero effort.

QRP beacons, truth be told, aren't terribly helpful. The ones that are "needed" are beacons than run in the 10W to 100W output range so they simulate what ham stations are actually using to make contacts and provide a reasonable representation of band conditions. The smaller and crappier the beacon antenna is (some are terrible), the more power the beacon should really run if anyone is expected to hear it.

I'd only have a QRP beacon if it's at a remote mountaintop site running on a battery and solar panel. For an "at home" beacon, there's just no reason for it.

AC0FP
07-19-2011, 02:42 PM
I wouldn't waste time, effort or money on this when I have now seen several TX-62s (did a search) for in the $35 range.

This is a 6m CW transmitter than can run from 1W to about 40W output (just dial it up) and has a built-in AC power supply and very good keying characteristics. Add one crystal and something to key it and you have a very reliable beacon with zero effort.

QRP beacons, truth be told, aren't terribly helpful. The ones that are "needed" are beacons than run in the 10W to 100W output range so they simulate what ham stations are actually using to make contacts and provide a reasonable representation of band conditions. The smaller and crappier the beacon antenna is (some are terrible), the more power the beacon should really run if anyone is expected to hear it.

I'd only have a QRP beacon if it's at a remote mountaintop site running on a battery and solar panel. For an "at home" beacon, there's just no reason for it.Your probably right. I saw a CW transmitter in my new QST that arrived yesterday. Their design was similar to what I was thinking of, except I was going to use a 3rd overtone crystal colpitts oscillator, a bipolar buffer and a Toshiba FET final with LPF. The on frequency oscillator would of made a clean transmitter and I would have keyed it on/off by removing the bias on the FET's gate.

73,

fp

WB2WIK
07-19-2011, 04:24 PM
Your probably right. I saw a CW transmitter in my new QST that arrived yesterday. Their design was similar to what I was thinking of, except I was going to use a 3rd overtone crystal colpitts oscillator, a bipolar buffer and a Toshiba FET final with LPF. The on frequency oscillator would of made a clean transmitter and I would have keyed it on/off by removing the bias on the FET's gate.

73,

fp

Homebrewing is fun but from a practical standpoint if I can get something better that costs even less than the project, I'll skip the project.:)

IMO, neither 6m nor 10m needs more QRP beacons, especially not in the U.S. where there's already hundreds of them and nobody can hear half of them. We might be able to use a few more 100W beacons, though, especially if they're located where other such beacons aren't.

KM1H
07-20-2011, 04:09 PM
The only good use I can think of for 6M QRP beacons is antenna pattern testing as long as they are horizontally polarized. When the band is wide open they are a nuisance often covering up DX.

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