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View Full Version : Q - code in FM mode on repeaters , usage ?



AG6JU
03-25-2011, 05:36 AM
I was listening in , some local repeaters, and topic of conversation were if it is proper to use Q-code on FM.
one person were saying Q-code in FM is not necessary since FM is clear sound, should just use plain language.
other party were saying, Q-code is OK to use even in FM, because it is internationally accepted code.
what you guys think ?

KD0NZL
03-25-2011, 05:44 AM
i think either is fine. whatever the operator is comfortable with. i dont know the Q codes very well yet so the more i hear them the more familiar i get with them. :)

KC9KHG
03-25-2011, 05:49 AM
Q codes are CW short cuts. Why would anyone want to use them on any phone band? Funny thing is,I hear them used more on phone than I do CW!! QSL?
Seriously though,it really makes no difference. If it makes you feel like more of a ham to use Q codes on the repeater,use them.

NC9Z
03-25-2011, 06:15 AM
It's fine in small doses, but can rapidly reach a point olf diminishing returns and increase the difficulty for those not regularly using CW. Listen to Police and you'll hear a mix of code and plain language, even truckers mix their slang with just normal plain language, too much code and you can start to lose your message, especially in an informal setting.

There is also a point where it's a natural carry over and a point where it becomes deliberate.

XU7ADQ
03-25-2011, 07:07 AM
There is also a point where it's a natural carry over and a point where it becomes deliberate.

I sometimes find myself answering my phone with 'go ahead', especially after a night shift...

Sad.......

KA9VQF
03-25-2011, 07:37 AM
I don’t know,… I talk on a fairly regular basis to a few of the people who used to be in law enforcement or on the ambulance department.

They still use 10 codes along with Q codes and many have a habit of saying hihi instead of just laughing even if you are talking to them in person, not on a radio at all.

Its something you just get used to and either bitch about it all the time or let it roll off. I let it roll.

When I carried a badge I was always getting reamed for using plain language and not using the official 10 codes. Eventually I learned the most commonly used ones the county adopted from the state patrol but I kept a list in the squad car and close to my scanner at home so I could tell what they were talking about.

I think its funny that most police departments are stressing using plain language now. I guess since so many departments have had to go to trunked radio systems the average scanner listener of old can’t here them anyway.

N1JBS
03-25-2011, 09:05 AM
I guess since so many departments have had to go to trunked radio systems the average scanner listener of old can’t here them anyway.

I listen to many trunked radio systems with no problem, but there are some exceptions to that rule...

WA4OTD
03-25-2011, 11:57 AM
Not a problem for me, although I rarely use on FM or CW. They are like many other phrases like "roger that" or "gotcha" or "yes sir boys and girls" or "you know" any of hundreds of other phases that are said locally and individually. Growing up in rural Tennessee I know I have many sayings not commonly used, but I use every so-so :)

I do cringe when I hear 10 codes. There are only a few Q codes I might use like if I change freqs I'll use QSY, if I'm saying where I live I'll use QTH, if I have interference I'm likely to say QRM instead of interference.

K1DNR
03-25-2011, 12:21 PM
I'm not sure I understand the comparison to emergency services or truck drivers.
Police and Fire around here use extensive codes in their voice transmissions.

Is this really a problem???

Q codes are a part of ham radio and there are so many common, mundane, things we can express with a simple Q code.

"Time for me to QRT Bob, gotta get up in the morning, 73"
"I'm getting out of range, Now QSY to to the North Hampton input"
"I'm back at the QTH. Time to QRT"

Nobody says you have to use them, but I see absolutely no issue with their usage.

There's always going to be someone who overdoes it and sounds like an idiot. That's life. That's why they are called lids.

It doesn't usually take long before someone makes a post about it, or better yet tells the op himself to cut it out.

K8EEI
03-25-2011, 12:52 PM
Well , not to be a " know -it-all " , but they are called " Q Signals " and they were made for CW .

If they are abused on voice , such as a graduate from SSB CB using "QSL " or " QSL ? " on every transmission on SSB or AM or FM it can get annoying and I just QSY . QSL? (LOL HIHI) .

" QSL on your over and I'll raise you one 10-4 ...Roger? ":eek:

" What is your vector , Victor ? That is a roger , Roger " . And who the heck is " Raw Joe " ?

Just talk normal

WF7A
03-25-2011, 12:58 PM
Since our mission as hams is to get a message across and understood, I see nothing wrong with using Q-codes...though they can become annoying since it's easier on the brain to interpret plain speech than codified messages/phrases.

I'd be more concerned with using the established ICAO phonetic alphabet (a = alpha, b = bravo, c = charlie, etc.) than a cutesy, made-up or non-standard phonetic alphabet.

K3XR
03-25-2011, 01:07 PM
Well , not to be a " know -it-all " , but they are called " Q Signals " and they were made for CW .

If they are abused on voice , such as a graduate from SSB CB using "QSL " or " QSL ? " on every transmission on SSB or AM or FM it can get annoying and I just QSY . QSL? (LOL HIHI) .

They have evolved over the years, not just for CW.
"Some Q codes are also used in aviation, in particular QNH and QFE, referring to certain altimeter settings. These codes are used in radiotelephone conversations with air traffic control as unambiguous shorthand, where safety and efficiency are of vital importance. A subset of Q codes is used by the Miami-Dade County, Florida local government for law enforcement and fire rescue communications, one of the few instances where Q codes are used in ground voice communication."

Wikipedia has the above quote and more here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_code

Q codes/signals on voice have been around for the 51 years I have been in the hobby and expect they might be around long after I am gone.

N5MDT
03-25-2011, 01:34 PM
Police and Fire around here use extensive codes in their voice transmissions.

Is this really a problem???

Yes, it is. First, it was mandated after Katrina that all public service agencies stop using local codes and use plain text language. This is so that the firefighters (or EMS or police...) from New York (or wherever) assisting in Louisiana was able to communicate effectively with firefighters from Arizona assisting in Louisiana.

And second, even in a local setting there are mutual aid agreements between departments within a 50 mile radius or so, between multiple types of agencies (police <> fire, fire <> EMS, police <> EMS) and we all have to speak the same language. So, any codes are out. We don't use them any longer. However, there are departments that simply have not made the transformation yet and those agencies that have not trained their staffs to use plain language will soon lose federal funding... Sadly, law enforcement agencies have been the slowest in our area to embrace the plan language mandate.

With respect to ham radio? Only ARES members need to forget to use any Q signs because no one will know what you are talking about...although I can see those that send Q signs in messages requiring the receiver to translate prior to delivering the message. Otherwise, use them or not makes no difference to me, but forcing new, no code ops, to use Q signs seems rather ridiculous to me.

N8ODF
03-25-2011, 01:38 PM
ZZO-ZWH....73

AD5MB
03-25-2011, 01:48 PM
so does QRZ.COM need to change its name?

N1MLF
03-25-2011, 02:03 PM
...agencies that have not trained their staffs to use plain language will soon lose federal funding...

I almost snorked the coffee on that.. So what do they do for training.. wash your mouth out with soap if you say 10-4??:eek:

..only in America..

73..JW

K8EEI
03-25-2011, 03:03 PM
They have evolved over the years, not just for CW.
"Some Q codes are also used in aviation, in particular QNH and QFE, referring to certain altimeter settings. These codes are used in radiotelephone conversations with air traffic control as unambiguous shorthand, where safety and efficiency are of vital importance. A subset of Q codes is used by the Miami-Dade County, Florida local government for law enforcement and fire rescue communications, one of the few instances where Q codes are used in ground voice communication."

Wikipedia has the above quote and more here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_code

Q codes/signals on voice have been around for the 51 years I have been in the hobby and expect they might be around long after I am gone.

From QRZ Hamspeak:

Q-Signals Originally developed by CW (Morse Code) operators to make certain, frequently used phrases short and concise -- a sort of Morse Code "shorthand". Common signals include "QST" (announcement), "QSL" (confirmation), and "QTH" (location), and "QRZ" ("who is calling me?"). For more Q-signals, please see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_code.

As I said , use them , but don't abuse them on voice ... Just talk normal

K4WGE
03-25-2011, 03:36 PM
...it was mandated after Katrina that all public service agencies stop using local codes and use plain text language... those agencies that have not trained their staffs to use plain language will soon lose federal funding...

"It was mandated"? Some federal bureaucrat told the local agencies what to do again.

Maybe someday the locals will think twice before taking federal money?:rolleyes:

Probably not.

Of course this has nothing to to with Q signals on repeaters. Until that issue becomes a federal mandate.

K9STH
03-25-2011, 03:52 PM
Use of "Q" signals on phone has been a part of amateur radio from long before I got my Novice Class license in 1959. There are certain "Q" signals that have a definite meaning which has transcended into the "slang" of amateur radio. Now I do cringe when someone overuses "Q" signals or is using them not in the proper context.

The "Q" signals that are commonly heard on phone for the past almost century are

QRM = Interference from other stations

QRN = Noise, generally atmospheric

QRT = Cease transmitting

QSB = Signal fading

QSL = Verification, but usually meaning a QSL card

QSY = Change frequency

QTH = Location

There are a few others that may be heard on phone, but the above list gives the most common.

Now I definitely cringe when someone replies "QSL this, and QSL that" repeating the content of the station that just transmitted.

I have told this before, but the late Dave Osborn, K9BPV (ex W2ZSK), used to sign QBE on both CW and phone instead of QRT when he was through transmitting for a while. Dave had been an airborne radio operator in the U.S. Navy when trailing wire antennas were the norm for HF communications. QBE means "I am reeling in my antenna" which meant that the station would no longer be transmitting. This is because the trailing wire antenna had to be reeled in before the aircraft could land.

Almost always, when an operator had not worked Dave before, the operator would ask what QBE meant. Dave would then "educate" that operator into what QBE means.

Glen, K9STH

WB2WIK
03-25-2011, 03:57 PM
I'm QLF for now.

CW ops know what that one means.;)

K9STH
03-25-2011, 04:30 PM
Years ago, there was an amateur radio operator who was born without arms. He was very good at sending CW with a straight key using either foot. He would often send that he was really QLF.

Glen, K9STH

N5PAR
03-25-2011, 05:21 PM
I use clear speech but if the other operator wants to use Q codes, so what. Even if I haven't head a paticular one I can ususally figure out what it means. I don't think with phone they are much quicker that clear speech althought I do see how it would be easier with CW. To me a ham saying "QSL" at the end of each transmission on phone is about the same as a CBer saying 10-4 after transmitting. I also hear "roger" a lot nowdays. They all mean about he samething. As they say down here in Texas. "What ever floats your boat."

WF7A
03-25-2011, 05:28 PM
I'm still confused about QUE: whether it means "Get in line, I'm working...(callsign)", "What?" (Spanish), or "Gotta go--I'm shooting pool and it's my turn."

AB1OD
03-25-2011, 05:29 PM
"It was mandated"? Some federal bureaucrat told the local agencies what to do again.

Maybe someday the locals will think twice before taking federal money?:rolleyes:

Is there really a prohibition on 10-codes by agencies? I thought it was a prohibition on 10-codes / requirement for plain language when operating under a NIMS framework.

The latter makes some sense, actually. "Dear local government: If you experience a disaster and need us feds to help out, here are the rules we will be working under, since we cannot be expected to operate under thousands of different rules, depending on the jurisdiction. Accept these rules, or don't expect us to work with you in a disaster. We're giving the same message to every other government agency. It would probably make everyone's life easier in a multijurisdictional event if you operated under the same rules. Since we expect these rules to be used under federal intervention, why not practice using them at the state or regional level? Love and kisses, Uncle Sam."

There are times when the feds like to impose silly requirements on states and towns, but this isn't one of them. Most of what they're pushing for here is something resembling common sense.

NY7N
03-25-2011, 08:35 PM
When I was in college, we would sometimes express our displeasure with each other on our repeater with "QFU."

Pretty sure that one isn't on the books anywhere.

:D

AB1OD
03-25-2011, 08:39 PM
When I was in college, we would sometimes express our displeasure with each other on our repeater with "QFU."

Pretty sure that one isn't on the books anywhere.

:D

You would inquire about the magnetic heading of their runway? :)

NY7N
03-25-2011, 08:48 PM
You would inquire about the magnetic heading of their runway? :)

Ooooh, I stand (well, sit actually) corrected. :)

K0RGR
03-25-2011, 08:55 PM
Listen to the SSB DX contest this weekend, and tell me how many of the DX stations don't use 'QRZ?' a lot. I've never heard anybody say "Who is calling me?".

I am guilty of using QSY for 'change frequency', but I never 'QSY over to the convenience store' as some people do.

I try to avoid 'QTH' even on CW - it's redundant unless you're working a non-English speaker. On most modes the exchange is ' you're 5X9 here in Bugtussle, Minnesota' or 'UR 599 in Bugtussle, MN' on CW.

I do use QRN, QRM, and QSB on HF, but not on FM.

KF6ABU
03-25-2011, 09:02 PM
I always "appreciate" it when people on voice say "hi hi" and when they speak in the third person "operator here is" "live by myself, we use a...." "we here talked to you last year in...."

K4KYV
03-25-2011, 09:45 PM
I do use QRN, QRM, and QSB on HF, but not on FM.

I generally try to avoid using Q-signals on phone, but many of them have slipped into amateur radio jargon, to the point that people use them even when talking to another ham in person.

But phone is phone. What makes it more or less appropriate to use them on FM repeaters than on HF phone? Or, as some might insist, is FM repeater operation something distinctly different from amateur radio?

WB2WIK
03-25-2011, 09:48 PM
When I was in college, we would sometimes express our displeasure with each other on our repeater with "QFU."

Pretty sure that one isn't on the books anywhere.

:D

I've worked 4Q2PAL several times. He usually calls me if I use the wrong VFO and stuff.

K1DNR
03-28-2011, 02:51 AM
I've worked 4Q2PAL several times. He usually calls me if I use the wrong VFO and stuff.

He must be the guy who yelled at me when I forgot to hit the split button on the FT-857D. He never id's though...

KD8NPB
03-28-2011, 05:32 AM
The only Q-code I really use on repeaters is "QSY". I sometimes say "Back at my QTH" when referring to my base. That's about it really.

N0AZZ
03-28-2011, 11:36 AM
Just KISS and use plain english save the rest for HF and alot of it for CW.

W8MLD
03-28-2011, 02:36 PM
I don't see how this is even an issue. In reality it is up to the individual operator as to use or not use the Q codes over repeaters and other phone modes. And, if a new ham is not familiar with them, what better way to introduce them to the Q codes than to use them on phone transmissions.

KB6M
03-30-2011, 06:07 AM
Since I am retired military, currently working law enforcement, and a ham, I occasionally catch flak about my radio traffic.
While working LE, the communications tech called me on the radio and requested a 10-73 (radio check). I answered him with "full quieting". My dispatcher asked if I meant 10-2.
I've been known to throw a couple of 10-4s out to the locals on the repeaters. And, I've even used the wrong phonetic alphabet from time-to-time. I'm not sure it matters as long as you get the message across. I don't use Q-codes at work, I try not to use 10 codes on ham radio. But, sometimes the mouth is quicker than the brain. Copy?

Greg

K4WGE
03-30-2011, 07:35 AM
"I don't see how this is even an issue. In reality it is up to the individual operator as to use or not use the Q codes over repeaters and other phone modes. And, if a new ham is not familiar with them, what better way to introduce them to the Q codes than to use them on phone transmissions."

Kew Ess Ale

K3RKS
03-30-2011, 07:15 PM
A favorite: Seventy threes I have destinated.....

K7KBN
03-30-2011, 07:42 PM
A favorite: Seventy threes I have destinated.....

I was wondering who would be the first to mention "destinated". I actually heard somebody on a local repeater several years ago announce that he was "QTHed".

SIGH!

KJ4LEN
03-31-2011, 01:37 AM
I use quite a few Q codes on CW. Sending 3 letters in place of a whole sentence saves a lot of time and is easier on the fist. I don't work repeaters but I do occasionally get on HF phone and sometimes use a few Q codes. I normally say "Roger" but I've noticed if there is much QRM then "QSL" is better understood particularly during contest.

Has anyone used or heard another operator use "QRL?" or "QRX" on phone? I heard a DX station use "QRX" and thought it would have been clearer to the operators in the pile up if he would have just said "Standby" or "Wait". By the way, the pile up did not QRX. Hi

K0BG
03-31-2011, 05:22 PM
One of my favorite quotes:


Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent. George Orwell

W7CI
03-31-2011, 07:03 PM
Is this inane thread still active? It's given that no real Ham would ever use "Q" Signals on "Funky Modulation Repeaters".

W5TTW
04-06-2011, 09:04 PM
Q codes are CW short cuts. Why would anyone want to use them on any phone band? So, what will you be calling in place of 'CQ?'

K9STH
04-06-2011, 09:58 PM
TTW:

According to the ARRL, at least in years past, the "correct" way to call "CQ" is

"Calling any amateur radio station, calling any amateur radio station", etc.

However, even the ARRL headquarters people didn't us that! Now they do use that, actually "calling all amateur radio stations", on bulletin stations. But, as for general operations, it just isn't used. When you heard that on the air you could be assured that the operator was brand new and only had the various ARRL publications to use as a guide.

Glen, K9STH

WA9SVD
04-21-2011, 11:28 PM
I use quite a few Q codes on CW. Sending 3 letters in place of a whole sentence saves a lot of time and is easier on the fist. I don't work repeaters but I do occasionally get on HF phone and sometimes use a few Q codes. I normally say "Roger" but I've noticed if there is much QRM then "QSL" is better understood particularly during contest.

Has anyone used or heard another operator use "QRL?" or "QRX" on phone? I heard a DX station use "QRX" and thought it would have been clearer to the operators in the pile up if he would have just said "Standby" or "Wait". By the way, the pile up did not QRX. Hi

Many "pile-ups" don't QRX even if they know the meaning.
QSL... er, I mean, ROGER, copy that... er, I mean do you confirm that?

AG6JU
04-23-2011, 06:30 AM
I guess many of HAM are more used to use Q code, because once every HAM had to start with Novice license with code only privilege. so people are used to using Q code, and when they up graded to technician or higher, they continue to use Q code on voice. but , today the situation are different, I assume there are many HAM who are unfamiliar with Q code, so not everybody understand them.

KF5REP
04-23-2011, 06:42 AM
The one that always befuddled me listening to th CB was "tan ford" instead of 10-4.

VE3UFC
04-23-2011, 09:43 PM
i agree about Q codes on repeaters. but having said that whats worse Q codes on repeaters or people using CB jargin on a pepeater such as 10-4 or roger dodger?

VK6ZGO
05-04-2011, 08:34 AM
i agree about Q codes on repeaters. but having said that whats worse Q codes on repeaters or people using CB jargin on a pepeater such as 10-4 or roger dodger?

CBers in VK6 used to say "Roger Dee".

I always assumed they were talking about Sandra's brother.:D

I wonder if he drove a tan Ford?


73,VK6ZGO

KB9BVN
05-04-2011, 09:44 AM
The phrases I always smile at when heard on the local 2m repeater:

Destinated - I am destinated so I am going to close and QRT, QSL.

Roger That - this is used by some hams to mean YES, or I understand, or just to make some noise.

K0RGR
05-04-2011, 05:47 PM
We always used the phrase 'destituted' because it was much closer to the truth.

QNI QRU

W2IBC
05-04-2011, 06:40 PM
41 ways to sound like a lid http://www.w2ibc.com/ftopict-2.html

1) Use as many Q signals as possible. Yes, I know they were invented solely for CW and are totally inappropriate for two-meter FM, but they're fun and entertaining. They keep people guessing as to what you really meant. For example, "I'm going to QSY to the kitchen." Can you really change frequency to the kitchen? QSL used to mean "I am acknowledging receipt," but now it appears to mean "yes" or "OK." I guess I missed it when the ARRL changed the meaning.

K3ROJ
05-06-2011, 11:18 AM
Take a listen on the 27 MHz band where Q codes are used often but not as much on our ham bands They should be used strictly for CW operators where a Q code saves time. The most often used code is "QRZ" which is an entire paragraph in itself.

K4UUG
05-06-2011, 03:23 PM
Why not just talk like you are on the telephone with another friend the geek speak the hi hi and the qsl
qrt sounds dorky.

M0GVZ
05-08-2011, 12:17 PM
Q codes are CW short cuts. Why would anyone want to use them on any phone band?

Is everyone in America as ignorant of the rest of the world as you are? Here's a clue: nearly 6 billion people in this world do not speak English. Q codes are understood universally in the amateur world and Q codes allow everyone to have a QSO giving name, signal report, location, report conditions all without needing to understand a single word of english other than the numbers 0-9.

K4WGE
05-08-2011, 01:07 PM
Is everyone in America as ignorant of the rest of the world as you are? Here's a clue: nearly 6 billion people in this world do not speak English.

Here is a list of countries where English is spoken, my belligerent little friend:

Antigua and Barbuda
Australia
Bahamas
Barbados
Beliza
Botswana
Brunei
Cameroon
Canada
Dominica
Ethiopia
Fiji
Gambia
Ghana
Grenada
Guyana
India
Ireland
Israel
Jamaica
Kenya
Kiribati
Lesotho
Liberia
Malawi
Malta
Marshall Islands
Mauritius
Micronesia
Namibia
Nauru
New Zealand
Nigeria
Pakistan
Palau
Papua New Guinea
Philippines
Rwanda
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Samoa
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Singapore
Solomon Islands
South Africa
Swaziland
Tanzania
Tonga
Trinidad and Tobago
Tuvalu
Uganda
United Kingdom
United States
Vanuatu
Zambia
Zimbabwe

And many people across the globe know and use English daily.

K8MHZ
05-08-2011, 01:42 PM
Is everyone in America as ignorant of the rest of the world as you are? Here's a clue: nearly 6 billion people in this world do not speak English. Q codes are understood universally in the amateur world and Q codes allow everyone to have a QSO giving name, signal report, location, report conditions all without needing to understand a single word of english other than the numbers 0-9.

How many countries are there that you can get an amateur radio license without knowing how to speak English? Here's a clue, they are few, if any, and they do not constitute a population of 6 billion.

K4WGE
05-08-2011, 04:09 PM
How many countries are there that you can get an amateur radio license without knowing how to speak English? Here's a clue, they are few, if any, and they do not constitute a population of 6 billion.

Exactly right about that. And half of that 6 billion is probably illiterate in their own language.


English is used as the lingua franca between nations where English is not the primary language. In a globalized world, the number of English learners around the world is only expected to further grow. Link (http://esl.about.com/od/englishlearningresources/f/f_eslmarket.htm)

K4WGE
05-08-2011, 04:12 PM
Is everyone in America as ignorant of the rest of the world as you are?

Are all the holders of M calls as arrogant and annoying as you are?

K9STH
05-08-2011, 04:25 PM
MHZ and WGE:

I didn't know that knowledge of English IS a requirement for getting a license in

Spain
Portugal
France
Germany
Denmark
Sweden
Norway
Russia
Czech Republic
Slovakia
Poland
Romania
Greece
Finland
Any of the Balkan countries
Jordan
Japan
Israel
Any of the former Soviet Union countries
Most of Asia
Most of South America
and even Canada (where French is one of the two official languages)

Yes, English is spoken by a lot of people worldwide. But, actually REQUIRING that English be spoken by the amateur radio operator is a completely different thing. Therefore, the statement about the majority of people speaking English, especially as their "first" language, not being the case, is absolutely true.

For those operators who work DX then English is generally understood, but there are a lot of operators who's understanding is rudimentary. However, as it being a requirement to obtain a license, that is not true. There are a LOT of amateur radio operators who either work only VHF or who are severely restricted in power output that work very little, if any, stations outside of their particular region.

Glen, K9STH

K4WGE
05-08-2011, 06:04 PM
MHZ and WGE:

I didn't know that knowledge of English IS a requirement for getting a license in

Spain
Portugal
France
Germany
Denmark
Sweden
Norway
Russia
Czech Republic
Slovakia
Poland
Romania
Greece
Finland
Any of the Balkan countries
Jordan
Japan
Israel
Any of the former Soviet Union countries
Most of Asia
Most of South America
and even Canada (where French is one of the two official languages)

Yes, English is spoken by a lot of people worldwide. But, actually REQUIRING that English be spoken by the amateur radio operator is a completely different thing. Therefore, the statement about the majority of people speaking English, especially as their "first" language, not being the case, is absolutely true.

For those operators who work DX then English is generally understood, but there are a lot of operators who's understanding is rudimentary. However, as it being a requirement to obtain a license, that is not true. There are a LOT of amateur radio operators who either work only VHF or who are severely restricted in power output that work very little, if any, stations outside of their particular region.

Glen, K9STH
Again:

"English is used as the lingua franca between nations where English is not the primary language. In a globalized world, the number of English learners around the world is only expected to further grow." Link (http://esl.about.com/od/englishlearningresources/f/f_eslmarket.htm)

M0GVZ
05-08-2011, 10:07 PM
How many countries are there that you can get an amateur radio license without knowing how to speak English? Here's a clue, they are few, if any, and they do not constitute a population of 6 billion.

Thankyou for continuing to demonstrate the typical Yank ignorance of the rest of the world. Pray tell, what language would the 1.3 billion people in China take their test in? What about the 1.15 billion people in India?

And just because SOME speak english doesn't mean that ALL of them do.

K9STH
05-08-2011, 10:52 PM
WGE:

Again, many people in other countries do speak English as a second or third language. However, being able to speak English is NOT a requirement that any country in which English is NOT the primary language in any country of which I know to obtain an amateur radio operator's license. Being able to speak English is NOT a requirement to be an amateur radio operator. Using English to identify the station IS an FCC requirement which applies to even Puerto Rico where Spanish is normally spoken because Puerto Rico is under the jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commission. But, any recognized language can be used within the jurisdiction of the FCC to communicate so long as the station identification is made in English.

Being able to use English is definitely "handy", just like speaking French was in the 19th century. But, there is a BIG difference in being able to speak/understand English and being REQUIRED to speak English.

The majority of persons in the United States only speak English and, as such, we expect the people from other nations to speak English as well. As for myself, I speak English. I do remember a very few words of German from a course that I took in college, I can understand a little bit of Spanish because I took Latin in high school, and I can count in Japanese. Other than that, I am completely lost when people speak other languages.

That reminds me of a situation where an oilman from Texas was visiting France for a business meeting. His French opposite spoke French, English, German, and a couple of other languages. But, he refused to use English when conversing with the Texan wanting the oilman to use some language other than English. When the oilman was asked what languages he spoke the oilman replied, "English, a little bit of 'Tex Mex', and a whole lot of 'Texan'." The Frenchman laughed and said, "then we will converse in cowboy!"

Glen, K9STH

KJ4VOV
05-09-2011, 01:47 AM
I really don't see what the fuss is about As hams our goal is to communicate as clearly, concisely and easy as possible. If using a Q signal, or even a 10 code or non-standard phonetic allows getting the message across quickly and cleanly, especially when band conditions are less than optimal then why not use 'em?

W8XV
05-09-2011, 02:06 AM
I always "appreciate" it when people on voice say "hi hi" and when they speak in the third person "operator here is" "live by myself, we use a...." "we here talked to you last year in...."

sounds like a minor case of that invisible friend syndrome. :eek: :D

KG6MZS
05-09-2011, 02:38 PM
Thankyou for continuing to demonstrate the typical Yank ignorance of the rest of the world.

I don't think it is ignorance so much as it is chauvinism. You might know it as jingoism over there in the UK and, I might add, it isn't unknown in your parts, either.

K4WGE
05-10-2011, 11:56 PM
I don't think it is ignorance so much as it is chauvinism. You might know it as jingoism over there in the UK and, I might add, it isn't unknown in your parts, either.

M0GVZ doesn't display jingoism so much as a deep dislike for Americans. If he doesn't like Americans, he could just leave QRZ, but apparently he needs a place to vent his spleen.

K4WGE
05-11-2011, 12:04 AM
WGE:

Again, many people in other countries do speak English as a second or third language. However, being able to speak English is NOT a requirement that any country in which English is NOT the primary language in any country of which I know to obtain an amateur radio operator's license.

Yes, and we've had this refrain of "6 billion people in the world, how many speak English?" repeated over and over.

The real issue is what fraction of the 6 billion have ham licenses and what percentage of them speak English or live in an English-speaking country.


"English is used as the lingua franca between nations where English is not the primary language. In a globalized world, the number of English learners around the world is only expected to further grow."

Link (http://esl.about.com/od/englishlearningresources/f/f_eslmarket.htm)

KJ4VOV
05-11-2011, 01:19 AM
M0GVZ doesn't display jingoism so much as a deep dislike for Americans. If he doesn't like Americans, he could just leave QRZ, but apparently he needs a place to vent his spleen.

Frankly, some of us could use a bit of bashing now and then, and GVZ makes a few good points.

K4WGE
05-11-2011, 01:39 AM
Frankly, some of us could use a bit of bashing now and then, and GVZ makes a few good points.

I would call that masochism, but suit yourself.

K9STH
05-11-2011, 02:06 AM
WGE:

When I was growing up, optimists said that the children should learn Russian and the pessimists said that they should learn Chinese!

As things are going these days, it is more like the optimists say that the children should learn Spanish and the pessimists still say they should learn Chinese!

Again, how many of the persons licensed have higher class licenses and can generally work HF and therefore DX. There are hundreds of thousands of amateur radio operators in the world who are basically restricted to either VHF only, or, if they do have HF privileges they are often limited to like power output levels of no more than 10 watts. How many of those operators are going to use English when they communicate? VERY few unless they just happen to live in countries where English is the first language.

You are defending your position based on a relatively small segment of the amateur radio operators worldwide. Yes, a goodly number of those operators which we routinely work from the United States do have a fair grasp of English. But, there are still operators who only have a rudimentary knowledge of English and who often participate in the signal report, name, location, and then goodbye type of contact. Also, you have stated that knowing English IS a requirement for obtaining an amateur radio operator's license in countries in which English is not the primary language. This is just plain not true!

Knowing English is definitely an advantage when working other stations outside of the region in which the operator is located. But, knowing English is NOT a requirement for obtaining an amateur radio operator's license. One can even get an amateur radio operator's license in Puerto Rico without knowing English since the examinations are available in Spanish and Puerto Rico is under the jurisdiction of the FCC. The problem with your position is that you have stated that knowing English is a requirement for obtaining a license instead of stating that knowing English definitely makes it easier when working DX. Big difference!

Glen, K9STH

K4WGE
05-11-2011, 04:24 AM
Well, in any case, we have come a long way from talking about Q signals on FM repeaters.:)

KI4NGN
05-11-2011, 04:00 PM
Well, in any case, we have come a long way from talking about Q signals on FM repeaters.:)

And when you get right down to it, why would anyone care about the use of Q codes on FM? Seriously...who cares?!?! :)

K8MHZ
05-15-2011, 02:32 PM
And when you get right down to it, why would anyone care about the use of Q codes on FM? Seriously...who cares?!?! :)

QSL on that, for sure.

WA9SVD
05-20-2011, 05:02 PM
I almost snorked the coffee on that.. So what do they do for training.. wash your mouth out with soap if you say 10-4??:eek:

..only in America..

73..JW

I'd assume they would educate and train their personnel to use proper "PLAIN ENGLISH" responses before they learned jargon such as "10-4," QSL?

N0AZZ
05-21-2011, 09:39 AM
Thought about this for a while and agreed that it was true but on 2m FM which I left 3 yrs ago I now use 2m SSB / weak signal / digital JT65.

I do use a FM repeater on 6m that is linked and it has none of the problems the 2m FM has. I use a reprogrammed Midland L/M 110w works great. The only thing I use 2m FM for is to connect to D-Star setup.

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