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KF7AYS
10-09-2010, 07:25 AM
Anyone doing anything with 6 Meter? I am thinking of setting up a 6m dipole in my apartment and seeing if I can get out.

Cheers,

AI6DX
10-09-2010, 07:51 AM
Anyone doing anything with 6 Meter? I am thinking of setting up a 6m dipole in my apartment and seeing if I can get out.

Cheers,
YES! 6M is alive and well, so long as you don't expect to get on there and talk on a regular basis. 6 meters is a band where one needs "patients." But when it opens due to:

*Sporadic-E
*Tropo skip
*Auroral skip (Usually in Alaska/Canada only)
*Line-of-sight
*Meteor scatter
*F2 layer propagaion (sun spot maximum)

....you'll know it! There's a reason why it's the only band dubed the "Magic Band." It's the only band that performs like traditional VHF bands AND.... True HF bands. It's very unique but again, you need to be patient, like you're fishing or hunting for that rare trophy.

Usually around June and again in December when E-skip is prevalent, is a great time for 6 meters. Also, when the sun spot count is high, 6 Meters performs rather well.

(Remember, sporadic-E has nothing to do with sun spot numbers which generally affects the F2 region. They are two different "animals.")

Anyway, keep an ear to the calling frequency of 50.125 USB, 50.135 & 50.110 (DX windows). Also, 50.400 is an "AM" traditional frequency and 52.525 (FM calling frequency.).

Last but not least is the various 6m repeaters. Here in Cali, there are many.

I highly highly highly recommend the book, "Six Meters a guide to the Magic Band" (ISBN 0970520638) by Ken Neubeck (WB2AMU).
http://www.eham.net/data/reviews/images/2591.jpeg
EXCELLENT EXCELLENT EXCELLENT PIECE OF WORK!!!! It's very detailed about 6 meters and I couldn't put the book down! Easy reading and teaches you everything you'd want to know about 6 meters. There is another 6 meter book written by a English guy, buy my own opinion is that that book is weak when compared to Ken Neubeck's book. (No I don't know Ken and I don't get any "kick-backs" for promoting his book).

As far as setting up a dipole for 6meters, there is mixed views on that. Many folk here in SoCal strickly stick to a vertically polarized radiator. I've experimented with both vertical and horizontal polarization. I have more luck with the vertically polarized antennas. Others I'm sure have different opinions. That is just my own.

Enjoy 6 meters!

KC8VWM
10-09-2010, 08:04 AM
A dipole in your apartment will work, and it will work well.

HOWEVER.

6 meters is not a band that is "open" all the time.

You might go for months without hearing anything at all. You must keep on top of the idea of "waiting" for a band opening which might occur at any moment.

Think of 6 meters as fishing. The thing with 6 meters is "if and when" the fish do bite, the haul you bring in is worth it. But it takes a lot of "waiting" inbetween for the fish to strike. It's not going to be a regular or everyday occurance.

WA6ITF
10-09-2010, 08:46 AM
Welcome to "the Magic Band." Ive been on 6 since 1959.

Im assuming your 6 meter radio runs SSB, CW, AM and FM. Two of the most active frequencies are 50.125 USB the national SSB calling frequency and 52.525 which is the national FM simplex calling channel. There's also activity time to time on 50.4 MHz in full carrier AM.

What I do every day is to call a CQ on 50.125 USB and listen for any response. Later in the afternoon I try 50.525 FM. On weekends I turn on a separate (read old) 6 meter crystal controlled AM transceiver and call CQ there as well.

Contacts may be few and far between, but always very interesting. Friendships made there seem to last a lifetime, Maybe that's the reason its called The Magic Band!

de
WA6ITF
de WA6ITF

KF7AYS
10-09-2010, 09:29 AM
The radio that I have is a Yeasu VX-7R portable. I am planning on setting up a vertical dipole(hey, they are short after all) and giving the 6m a shot.

AI6DX
10-09-2010, 11:20 AM
The radio that I have is a Yeasu VX-7R portable. I am planning on setting up a vertical dipole(hey, they are short after all) and giving the 6m a shot.
You'll have better luck with your vertical dipole than a horizontal dipole. Good choice. If you can ever get a vertical beam, that would be sweet too. :D:D:D

N0AZZ
10-09-2010, 11:21 AM
With that radio all you would be able to work is local repeaters.

AI6DX
10-09-2010, 11:24 AM
Welcome to "the Magic Band."
Hey, WA6ITF, you're the guy on the "Amateur Radio Newsline!" I'd recognize that call sign anywhere! :D:D:D

WA6ITF
10-09-2010, 01:57 PM
Hey, WA6ITF, you're the guy on the "Amateur Radio Newsline!" I'd recognize that call sign anywhere! :D:D:D

Among other things, yes I do produce Newsline. But long before Newsline I was addicted to 6 meters.

K7MH
10-09-2010, 04:25 PM
when the sun spot count is high, 6 Meters performs rather well.
Sure does! Been there! Awesome if you happen to be around the radio when it does!!
At the best of times that I have seen it is still not an everyday nor an all day thing.
I wouldn't expect anything during this cycle and quite possibly less in the next one;
Say Goodbye to Sunspots (http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2010/09/say-goodbye-to-sunspots.html)
and;
Long Term Evolution of Sunspot Magnetic Fields (http://arxiv.org/abs/1009.0784v1)
:(

WB2WIK
10-09-2010, 06:31 PM
The radio that I have is a Yeasu VX-7R portable. I am planning on setting up a vertical dipole(hey, they are short after all) and giving the 6m a shot.

You'll mostly have luck accessing local 6m repeaters with low power and an indoor vertical; look up your local repeaters, and try them!

A vertical dipole for 52 MHz is nine feet tall, so I hope you have a high ceiling.:)

WB2AMU
10-10-2010, 01:34 AM
Some thoughts on previous posts......

A dipole is an acceptable antenna on Six Meters in the weak signal portion (CW and SSB) if you are dealing with space issues or are just starting. Granted, it is not the most optimal antenna on the band, but when conditions are very good, particularly during the summertime Sporadic-E season or during maximum F2 activity on the band, you can do pretty good.

With regards to Six Meter FM.....I really wish that there is more activity on this part of the band. In the NYC/LI area, there is only one repeater that I know of. I believe that there is more in California and probably 52.525 FM in California is seeing a fair amount of local activity. I am not too sure what other population areas in the country has sufficient Six Meter FM activity. I believe that some multi-band repeater setups have Six Meter link-ups - North Atlanta area is one that I remember from about 15 years ago.

I want to point out that while aurora propagation on Six is common in Alaska and Canada, it reaches to northern US states and mid-latittude stations as well. I was encouraged by a decent aurora opening on Six Meters this past August 3rd where we worked into CT, ME, NJ, MD and NY via auroar backscatter. This is encouraging with regards to the new cycle, since the last aurora opening that I had experienced on the band was in August of 2006, so things are slowly progressing.

Enjoy the Magic Band!

73

KEN WB2AMU

WB2WIK
10-10-2010, 02:22 AM
I want to point out that while aurora propagation on Six is common in Alaska and Canada, it reaches to northern US states and mid-latittude stations as well. I was encouraged by a decent aurora opening on Six Meters this past August 3rd where we worked into CT, ME, NJ, MD and NY via auroar backscatter. This is encouraging with regards to the new cycle, since the last aurora opening that I had experienced on the band was in August of 2006, so things are slowly progressing.



Ever worke AU on FM? I haven't.

He's using an FM-only hand held.

I ran a kilowatt on 6 for many years and with that and stacked beams, still never worked AU on FM. Only on CW and SSB. Might be possible on digi modes, never tried, but I doubt it.

WB2AMU
10-10-2010, 09:01 PM
No, I have never worked Aurora on FM....I have done it on SSB and CW and as high as 144 MHz. CW is generally the best way to do aurora contacts because of the high distortion. I would venture to say that you could hear something on FM but nothing intelligible to copy. On 144 MHz aurora, SSB is too difficult because of the wide signal, so CW is pretty much the way to go, so I doubt FM is going to work out.

Anyway, I just wanted to clarify an earlier statement made by one of the posters that aurora on Six Meters is mostly Canada and Alaska....it does go down into the states often.

Enjoy Six Meters!

73

KEN WB2AMU

WA4OTD
10-10-2010, 09:12 PM
The magic has been gone since 7/24 for me. I haven't heard a station since then. But, I don't hang out there a lot. However in May, June and July I worked ~150 stations and received cards from 6M for about 1/2 of my WAS award this year and worked 10 countries. The magic band is a good name. All with dipole in attic.

But then the magic is gone.....really lonely.

WB2AMU
10-10-2010, 09:17 PM
HI OTD:

Yes, the summertime Sporadic-E season kind of died early this year....really did not see much in August either, except for the aurora opening that I mentioned.

I think that you will see a number of expeditions next year to the Caribbean with the further split-up of PJ countries!

73

KEN WB2AMU

WA4OTD
10-10-2010, 09:28 PM
Hello Ken;

Hey, read your book cover to cover, really great book!

I also let me tech borrow it and he read it also.

I have a 4 element yagi built waiting on motivation to put in attic!

When will I start hearing stations on 6M again? Hopefully before next may!

Thanks
Leroy


HI OTD:

Yes, the summertime Sporadic-E season kind of died early this year....really did not see much in August either, except for the aurora opening that I mentioned.

I think that you will see a number of expeditions next year to the Caribbean with the further split-up of PJ countries!

73

KEN WB2AMU

WB2AMU
10-10-2010, 09:31 PM
Hi Leroy:

Thanks for the nice words...I hope that you enjoyed the book and also your friend as well.

Leroy, there is some Six Meter Sporadic-E that can show up as early as late October and goes through early February. There may be as many as three to five days of Sporadic-E activity per month in November through January timeframe. Openings a bit elusive but the spotting sites are a big help. Most of the openings are single-hop affairs but the signals can get quite loud! So don't give up!

73 and thanks,

KEN WB2AMU

WA4OTD
10-10-2010, 09:42 PM
Hello Ken;

Thanks for the info. Sounds like I really need to make sure my yagi is tuned and get it in the attic. Everytime I'm on I scan through 6M couple times just to see if anyone is there and sometimes set CQ loop and let that run aroun 50.095-50.097.

hope to cu on 6M soon!

73's
Leroy


Hi Leroy:

Thanks for the nice words...I hope that you enjoyed the book and also your friend as well.

Leroy, there is some Six Meter Sporadic-E that can show up as early as late October and goes through early February. There may be as many as three to five days of Sporadic-E activity per month in November through January timeframe. Openings a bit elusive but the spotting sites are a big help. Most of the openings are single-hop affairs but the signals can get quite loud! So don't give up!

73 and thanks,

KEN WB2AMU

N4KZ
10-10-2010, 11:10 PM
Patients = people in a hospital.

Patience = needed when working 6 meters; particularly with a low-powered FM only handheld radio.

73 and GL,
N4KZ

WB2WIK
10-11-2010, 01:10 AM
No, I have never worked Aurora on FM....I have done it on SSB and CW and as high as 144 MHz. CW is generally the best way to do aurora contacts because of the high distortion. I would venture to say that you could hear something on FM but nothing intelligible to copy. On 144 MHz aurora, SSB is too difficult because of the wide signal, so CW is pretty much the way to go, so I doubt FM is going to work out.

Anyway, I just wanted to clarify an earlier statement made by one of the posters that aurora on Six Meters is mostly Canada and Alaska....it does go down into the states often.

Enjoy Six Meters!

73

KEN WB2AMU

Ken, I've made many hundreds (maybe thousands) of Au contacts on 6m and 2m, and a couple on 135cm. Never on FM, and although I've tried and tried to make one on 70cm, never did that, either. All CW and SSB.

When I lived in Northern NJ, Au was fairly common, we'd look forward to it. Just as it totally screws up the lower bands on HF, it really spices things up nicely on 50 and 144 MHz. I remember driving up Interstate 287 in Boonton, NJ in about 1978 or so one late afternoon/early evening and the sky to the north looked like it was literally on fire. I was chatting with a guy on a local 2m repeater and said, "Pete, look to the north, up in the sky. Do you see what I see?"

Yes, he did, and so did everybody else. The Au was so low and so close we could see it in NJ (not a common occurance, at all, for it to be "visible"). I raced home to get on VHF, and it was about the best Au I can ever remember: VE1 to W9/W0, down to W4, all so strong that even the crazy Au signals -- which often register "nothing" on an S-meter -- were indicating S9 and higher.

I think I made about 150 contacts in that one session, which lasted a couple of hours.

Unfortunately, here in southern CA where I've lived for 22 years, Au is between extremely rare and nonexistent -- we're just too far from where it really happens. But I sure agree, all the "northern" states get it just fine, and New England through Minnesota, especially, plus of course Canada and AK, get it a LOT.

But not on FM.:p

WB2AMU
10-11-2010, 02:16 AM
Roger that, WB2WIK

I can imagine it being a bit tough for aurora in California.

I think that one test regarding FM would be to listen to FM broadcast stations around 88 MHz during a very strong aurora opening to see what effects of aurora may have on their signals. I think that there may be some scientific paper on certain modes that were used during aurora, but not sure...would have to look.

One of my favorite aurora contacts on Six was with a station only 12 miles away from my work QTH about seven years ago. Normally, I could work him with my portable beam from the work QTH facing him with moderate power. We both pointed up north to bounce off the aurora and laughed all the away....probably about 100 miles or more of signal travel pointing up north for an as the bird flys distance of only 15 miles!

One of my dreams is that the ARRL awards more points for certain types of QSOs during their three VHF contests. FM QSOs should be worth extra points on certain bands. Also, all 220 MHz QSOs should be worth at least three points, not two. We will lose the rest of this band unless we promote as much activity as possible on it and additional points during the VHF contest is a start. I would like to see FM used more during the contest to get some of the less-experienced people to work a few stations....oh well, it is a dream of mine...

73

KEN WB2AMU

K3XR
10-11-2010, 12:29 PM
Would someone care to explain why some hams, don't know if they are all new hams, use terms like 6 meter instead 6 meters, ham instead of ham radio. It seems that in recent years this trend is increasing, it has me scratching my bald head as to why.

WA2CWA
10-11-2010, 06:23 PM
Would someone care to explain why some hams, don't know if they are all new hams, use terms like 6 meter instead 6 meters, ham instead of ham radio. It seems that in recent years this trend is increasing, it has me scratching my bald head as to why.

You could say:
The 6 meter band is great.
But, would you say:
The 6 meters band is great.
However, you could say:
6 meters is great or Six meters is great.

Need to review the usage of singular/plural English language words or phrases as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs.

Pete, wa2cwa

K3XR
10-11-2010, 11:35 PM
You could say:
The 6 meter band is great.
But, would you say:
The 6 meters band is great.
However, you could say:
6 meters is great or Six meters is great.

Need to review the usage of singular/plural English language words or phrases as nouns, adjectives, or adverbs.

Pete, wa2cwa

Would you say I work 6 meters most nights or would you say I work 6 meter most nights?

If you have 1 box you say I have one box. If you have six boxes you don't say I have 6 box you say I have 6 boxes. In one case it's boxes in the other case it's meters.

What about Ham vs Ham Radio?

WB2AMU
10-11-2010, 11:42 PM
Some examples.....



Six Meter Beam....

Six Meter radio.....

Six Meters was great last night....

Six Meters, the Magic Band!



Newcomers can get a bit confused with ham lingo in general.

WB2WIK
10-12-2010, 12:16 AM
Some examples.....



Six Meter Beam....

Six Meter radio.....

Six Meters was great last night....

Six Meters, the Magic Band!



Newcomers can get a bit confused with ham lingo in general.

...or "my radio has six meters on it."

No, it doesn't cover 50 MHz. It really has six meters. One for plate current, one for grid current, one for screen current, one for high voltage, one for filament voltage, one for output power.:)

WW7F
10-12-2010, 12:37 AM
I know between the newspeak and the grammar lessons I am learning something,what I don't know just yet,and it is like the old "You say potato, I say po-tah-toe,Sometimes though it is nice to not have to worry about dotting all the Ts and crossing all those Is:) Yes, I typed the last sentance backwards, but that is what I meant to do:)
I have to say also, now this is from days of better propagation, I have worked a lot of stations, even had a big pileup on Thanksgiving day, 1989, I went out on our back patio after dinner and before the turkey coma set in to see if anyone was on.
I heard a few local big guns working the JAs, I think it was Auroral induced Sporadic E,I had a portable rig, a little import that was rated at about a half watt on AA batteries,it had a duck antenna, about a foot long, I inserted my call in the pileup, no luck,I then called a second time, I just said" WW7F, QRP DOZO!:) And I immediately found myself in a huge pileup,I said the Magic words on the Magic Band and have a pile of qsl cards to prove it.
The odd thing was the opening must have favored a fairly small area,The JAs could not hear a local hi power op just about 3 miles away, this guy had a long 6-8 el yagi and a kw I think,or perhaps I made some enemies by my little pileup:) Hope not, hi powered guy was angry and even think he gave up on 6 for a time, it blows a hi power hams mind when a qrp station gets the big pileups:P
Now I have to say this sort of thing DOES NOT happen regularly on 6 meters, but it does from time to time,I had fun with that little rig but I ended up frying something in the little rig and could not find a schematic for it, I think it was made by NEC and had a vxo with places for 4 crystals for the band, I still have the thing, it was my first rig I ever had for that band and wish I could fix it:(
I would also mention the frequency 50.140 Mhz as there is activity on that frequency down here in the Portland,Oregon area, there is a net on Monday or Tuesday evening,forgot which night but usually you can find folks on 50.140 mhz. also think is a psk net but forgot which frequency, last thing, you might try Pacific Northwest VHF Society's webpage,more activity up your way b ut good resaource in any case:) OK folks, 73 ,Michelle:)

K8JD
10-12-2010, 12:39 AM
The radio that I have is a Yeasu VX-7R portable. I am planning on setting up a vertical dipole(hey, they are short after all) and giving the 6m a shot.

A vertical dipole will do ok for local simplex (52.525 mHz) FM and repeaters.
Check your local listings for repeaters in your area.

WB2AMU
10-12-2010, 02:44 AM
I know between the newspeak and the grammar lessons I am learning something,what I don't know just yet,and it is like the old "You say potato, I say po-tah-toe,Sometimes though it is nice to not have to worry about dotting all the Ts and crossing all those Is:) Yes, I typed the last sentance backwards, but that is what I meant to do:)
I have to say also, now this is from days of better propagation, I have worked a lot of stations, even had a big pileup on Thanksgiving day, 1989, I went out on our back patio after dinner and before the turkey coma set in to see if anyone was on.
I heard a few local big guns working the JAs, I think it was Auroral induced Sporadic E,I had a portable rig, a little import that was rated at about a half watt on AA batteries,it had a duck antenna, about a foot long, I inserted my call in the pileup, no luck,I then called a second time, I just said" WW7F, QRP DOZO!:) And I immediately found myself in a huge pileup,I said the Magic words on the Magic Band and have a pile of qsl cards to prove it.
The odd thing was the opening must have favored a fairly small area,The JAs could not hear a local hi power op just about 3 miles away, this guy had a long 6-8 el yagi and a kw I think,or perhaps I made some enemies by my little pileup:) Hope not, hi powered guy was angry and even think he gave up on 6 for a time, it blows a hi power hams mind when a qrp station gets the big pileups:P
Now I have to say this sort of thing DOES NOT happen regularly on 6 meters, but it does from time to time,I had fun with that little rig but I ended up frying something in the little rig and could not find a schematic for it, I think it was made by NEC and had a vxo with places for 4 crystals for the band, I still have the thing, it was my first rig I ever had for that band and wish I could fix it:(
I would also mention the frequency 50.140 Mhz as there is activity on that frequency down here in the Portland,Oregon area, there is a net on Monday or Tuesday evening,forgot which night but usually you can find folks on 50.140 mhz. also think is a psk net but forgot which frequency, last thing, you might try Pacific Northwest VHF Society's webpage,more activity up your way b ut good resaource in any case:) OK folks, 73 ,Michelle:)

Thanks for the great story WW7F......Everyone has a favorite event on Six that they have experienced....which contributes to the magic!

AI6DX
10-12-2010, 07:54 AM
Would someone care to explain why some hams, don't know if they are all new hams, use terms like 6 meter instead 6 meters, ham instead of ham radio. It seems that in recent years this trend is increasing, it has me scratching my bald head as to why.
I don't think it's really that serious. Who cares? American Troops are dying in foreign countries..... now that's something to get worked up about. :eek:

WA6ITF
10-12-2010, 02:50 PM
HI OTD:

Yes, the summertime Sporadic-E season kind of died early this year....really did not see much in August either, except for the aurora opening that I mentioned.

I think that you will see a number of expeditions next year to the Caribbean with the further split-up of PJ countries!

73

KEN WB2AMU

I go back a bit further in time. First got on 6 in the fall of 1959 nusing a 7 watt out home built transmitter, L&W converter (that was deaf as a doorknob) and a Heathkit AR-2 receiver. Antenna was a 50' hank of bell wire hanging out the 2nd story window. Should not have worked but my first "CQ" landed W4OEH in Florida. I was still in Brooklyn NY with the then new call of WA2HVK and have never been off of 6 since.

Found a old logbook the other day from 1967. Entry reads: 11/16/67 - W9AXO - 08:50 pm est - 09:05 pm est -50.35mc - 5x9 aurora - A3 - Chet in Chicago.

I know in that era I was already on SSB with a P&H transverter and NCX-3 transceiver, but as most local NYC activity was still AM I also had a Gonset Comm III with four crystals. It had its own 3 element Telrex stacked under the 6 meter 6 el Hy-Gain Long John and 22 El two meter Cushcraft. So I worked Chicago on Aurora with 7 watts, crystal controlled and a 3-element beam pointed North and the QSO lasted a solid 15 minutes.

On the "Magic Band" anything can happen. Thats the reason that I have an MFJ - 9406 next to the desk monitoring 50.125 Mhz hooked to an AEA halo on my porch. If anything shows up, Ill hear it -- I hope. The radio is on 24 / 7 and once or twice a day I pick up the mic and call CQ. And If 6 gets hot, I simply flick the A-B coax switch to the FT-847 and go after it.

To those of you new to 6 meters, make it a habit to call at least one CQ a day. CW, SSB, FM, AM -- its not important what mode you use. Whats important is that you do it. A CQ is like a fishing line. When you cast it out you never know what you might catch. That's the "Magic."

Oh yes: If you have never heard it, Aurora on AM sounds like holding a QSO while gargling with Listerine.

de WA6ITF (ex-WA2HVK)

WB2AMU
10-13-2010, 12:13 AM
FB Bill on your aurora discussion.

When I give talks on Six Meters, I bring my recording of some great aurora openings on the band...many hams have never heard aurora before!


73

KEN WB2AMU

K0RGR
10-13-2010, 08:49 PM
I see one 6 meter repeater listed for Olympia - 53.030 out 51.330 in with a 100 Hz PL. That's a pretty unusual repeater split - 1.7 MHz..

K2WH
10-13-2010, 11:33 PM
Sorry, but I have to say this:



K2WH

WB2AMU
11-17-2010, 06:48 PM
If anyone is interested in a copy of the book, SIX METERS, A GUIDE TO THE MAGIC BAND, please contact me at kneubeck@suffolk.lib.ny.us

G8ADD
11-18-2010, 09:41 AM
To those of you new to 6 meters, make it a habit to call at least one CQ a day. CW, SSB, FM, AM -- its not important what mode you use. Whats important is that you do it. A CQ is like a fishing line. When you cast it out you never know what you might catch. That's the "Magic."

Oh yes: If you have never heard it, Aurora on AM sounds like holding a QSO while gargling with Listerine.

de WA6ITF (ex-WA2HVK)

There is an extensive beacon network on six, it is worth checking to see what beacons are coming through before calling CQ - the beacons will tell you which directions to beam in.

I haven't heard any AM on six, but SSB sounds like hoarse whispering! I remember a newly licensed guy telling me that he had heard "some idiot playing around whispering into the mike", he was amazed when I told him he had heard an auroral opening!

73

Brian G8ADD

NN4RH
11-18-2010, 11:14 AM
Would someone care to explain why some hams, don't know if they are all new hams, use terms like 6 meter instead 6 meters, ham instead of ham radio. It seems that in recent years this trend is increasing, it has me scratching my bald head as to why.

Do you have a 2 meters mobile? Or is it a 2 meter mobile?

Do you use a 20 meters dipole, or a 20 meter dipole?

Do you say you listen to shortwave? Or shortwave radio? Do you operate CB or is it CB radio? Do you listen to FM on your car radio, or do you listen to FM radio on your car radio? In that context, ham vs ham radio doesn't seem so out of place.

WB2AMU
11-18-2010, 11:40 AM
Hi Brian, G8ADD:

Thanks for sharing with us the SSB aurora story! I remember the first time that I heard aurora on Six Meters, both on SSB and CW - wild! I sometimes hear it on 10 Meters and once or twice, I believe that I heard traces of it on 15 Meters.

We are encouraged here about the new cycle, Cycle 24, as we had a moderate aurora opening in the Northeast on August 3rd of this years. (Please see my writeup on this in the Fall issue of CQ VHF). I think that more aurora events on Six Meters are in store over the next few years, and hoping that F2 on Six Meters will start showing up soon (Maybe by late 2011 or early 2012?).

Check spaceweather.com for daily information regarding solar flares and sunsposts.

73

KEN WB2AMU

My email for Six Meter book inquiries: kneubeck@suffolk.lib.ny.us

KC0ORP
11-20-2010, 09:57 AM
PATIENT:

Someone who has lost his voice, calling on 50.125 USB all day...

Also applies to 28.4 around here (STL Metro). We have at least two FM repeaters on 6, both dead unless there is a club event. There are two club nets on 10 each week, with about 4-6 ops in attendance.

During rare openings, I can get Brazil on 10- but not Crystal City 30 miles away. I can reach out 40-50 NM on 2 M 5W FM simplex, reliably. Just about the same on 446.00 UHF FM.

I can hear more activity on 27.185 AM (CB 19) than on 10.

N5REC
11-20-2010, 10:08 AM
It,s bad enough being known as Amateurs but HAM?HAMS!?

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