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KF6VB
07-21-2010, 12:52 PM
Hello,

At this month's ham swap, I had the good luck to acquire a TS-130S - for $5! In pieces!

The seller assured me that it was all there. The front panel was off, and also the rear heatsink. The board to board cables were all wadded up into a ball. One of the bandswitch wafers was laying at the side with all its cables. The radio did come with a copy of the service manual.

I figured there was $5 worth of entertainment there just putting it together. I started out by doing a rough mechanical assembly - OK, it's mostly there, except the RIT knob is missing.

The hard part: There are many missing and/or broken wires. And there seem to be some missing pins in the
connectors that plug into the circuit boards. And wires
that are busted off right at the pins.

The interconnect cables and connectors are not listed in the Parts List. They are a specific style with little ears at the end that prevent you from plugging them in backwards.

Does anybody know a source for parts for this specific connector system? I'm sure it's used both for other radios and other products.

Thanks in advance,

- Jerry Kaidor, KF6VB

W9GB
07-21-2010, 07:42 PM
The interconnect cables and connectors are not listed in the Parts List. They are a specific style with little ears at the end that prevent you from plugging them in backwards.

Does anybody know a source for parts for this specific connector system? I'm sure it's used both for other radios and other products.
Jerry -

YES. IF all of the parts are there (and the poor sole/Homer Simpson did not throw them out) .. you should be able to reassemble (great find) with PATIENCE,
MORE PATIENCE, Attention to Details, and a Mouser/DigiKey catalog. Previous Heathkit or Elecraft build expereince is invaluable for this type of re-build mess!

Many of the smaller connectors used in these radios are PC board/cable interconnect connectors that are sold by Molex or Amp/Tyco
(AMP/Tyco and Molex make thousands of models -- tougher than you may think to ID).

In order to help with your identification, get a GOOD metric and English ruler (small) ... the PIN spacing is critical in identifying the correct connector.

Some models of connectors use a spacing of .100 inch (2.54 mm), while other modules use .156 inch.

IF this radio used .100 inch spacing -- look at the MX-100 series by Molex.
These come in several varieties of pins, with or without ramps and "keying".
The version of the 3-pin connector of this series in used on many motherboards for the 3-pin fan connector.

w9gb

W4HAY
07-21-2010, 07:51 PM
That could be the most entertaining and educational $5 you'll ever spend. You'll probably add a few new words to your vocabulary!

KF6VB
07-21-2010, 11:47 PM
Jerry -

YES. IF all of the parts are there (and the poor sole/Homer Simpson did not throw them out) .. you should be able to reassemble (great find) with PATIENCE,
MORE PATIENCE, Attention to Details, and a Mouser/DigiKey catalog. Previous Heathkit or Elecraft build expereince is invaluable for this type of re-build mess!


*** Oh, I'm patient. And I do have a little electronics experience. I put together a Heathkit once, although they were a bit pricey for me to indulge frequently.

Lessee....

* Got my ham license around 1970. That led to a career in electronics, first as a bench tech in industry, then as an embedded systems programmer. Worked in an instrument shop for some years, troubleshooting scopes, oscillators, etc etc.

* Have built many amateur and electronic items over the years. Lately, have been building PIC-based projects. I design and fabricate my own circuit boards with free software and toner transfer. But the fun part about those is programming them and making them dance :). I'm also well set up to handle surface mount.

WRT the TS-130 - I am making up a spreadsheet listing all the missing wires, and possibly every wire in the radio. A complication is that not all the connectors are labelled in the schematic. In other words, many connectors do not have any component designation. Some have a designation on the schematic, but none on the actual boards.

Each cable connector has a designation stamped on it. Most of these are still legible. But the designation doesn't help when there is no connector on the schematic or physical boards with a matching designation #.

Another complication is that there is not much documentation about component subsystems that are not mounted on circuit boards. Things like inline chokes,
resistors, and caps. There are inline chokes in the keying circuit, for example. And a current sense resistor in series with the final amp power. And the usual zener diode bolted to the chassis for OV protection.

Interestingly, the final amp +Vcc is not switched! It just depends on the transistors being naturally biased OFF when the driving circuitry is not powered. That way, Kenwood got away with a little tiny power switch on the front panel.


When I get it together, the rig will doubtless still have
whatever problem inspired the PO to take it apart.


Many of the smaller connectors used in these radios are PC board/cable interconnect connectors that are sold by Molex or Amp/Tyco (AMP/Tyco and Molex make thousands of models -- tougher than you may think to ID).

*** Oh, I have no illusions as to the toughness.


In order to help with your identification, get a GOOD metric and English ruler

Actually, my weapon of choice for this kind of work is a dial caliper. But I'm too lazy at the moment to go up to the garage to get it :).


*** The connectors are definitely ten-grid ( 0.1" ). I just measured an 11-pin connector, EXACTLY one inch from the middle of the first pin to the middle of the 11th pin.



IF this radio used .100 inch spacing -- look at the MX-100 series by Molex.

...Looking....

- Jerry Kaidor

W9GB
07-22-2010, 03:36 AM
Jerry -

If this was my project, in addition to identifying the PC board to cable connector ... I would:

1. Ask for photos (with top and botton covers removed) from Kenwood TS-130 owners -- that helps in those un-documented connections.
2. Work on Jig-Saw puzzles in your spare time -- helps when you go back to project.
3. You basically are going to have to rebuild the cable harness in the radio.
One of my Elmers actually cleaned up (rewired) radio cable harnesses within Japanese (and TenTec) radios -- when he did not like them and thought workmanship was sub-standard. Try that for an instructor!
4. Set radio in nice area where it can sit for the duration of the project.

w9gb

WA7PRC
07-22-2010, 05:16 AM
Hi Jerry,

I've owned and worked on a TS-120S for a few decades and more recently, a TS-130S. I fear that IF you can get it put back together, it won't play at all. These rigs, while being pretty good performers when working, are well-known for some problems. Most notably, solder connections tend to go bad after some time. I found this to be true when replacing all the electrolytics in my TS-130S. Even though I was very careful when disconnecting & reconnecting the connectors from the PCB headers, I wound-up with more than a few solder connections that had fractured. I found several others that had not had all the flux cooked out. Expect to spend LOTS of quality time with your soldering pencil. As others have stated, the OEM connector housings and headers are unobtainium. You'll have to replace them with something else. Aside from 0.1" spacing, 2mm (about 0.079") is also common nowadays.

Another big concern is Electrostatic Discharge. These rigs use many MOS devices that are easily destroyed. Some have long-since been discontinued. You need to follow anti-ESD procedures to prevent damage. Since you got this rig "in a box", there's no telling if previous owner(s) followed proper anti-ESD procedures.

But, nothing ventured, nothing gained. Who knows... it could work fine after you get it back together. If nothing else, it'd be good for parts. I have the service manual online here (http://www.geocities.com/bswadener/TS130S/), along with selected pages rescanned, cleaned up, and printed to PDF format. You might find the main schematic to be much better than your copy. Also of interest may be a spreadsheet that shows modern electrolytic capacitors that I sourced. Most have a higher voltage rating, to get a suitable lead spacing. A few wound-up being replaced with tantalum types. The readme.txt file tells what the various files contain.

I have my 130 opened up right now (to fix another problem). If you'd like, I'll take photos - just say the word.

73 es GL,
Bryan WA7PRC

AB9LZ
07-22-2010, 11:59 AM
If that were my box of parts, I wouldn't bother re-creating the 120, but use the various bits to build something new.

73 m/4

EI3JU
07-22-2010, 12:41 PM
Hi Jerry

I have the QRP version, the TS-120V, which is the same rig with a different PA.

I'd be happy to take pictures of the entrails and email them to you if it would help?

KF6VB
07-22-2010, 03:23 PM
Hi Jerry

I have the QRP version, the TS-120V, which is the same rig with a different PA.

I'd be happy to take pictures of the entrails and email them to you if it would help?

*** Yes, please do. jerry@tr2.com

Thanks,
- Jerry

KF6VB
07-22-2010, 03:25 PM
If that were my box of parts, I wouldn't bother re-creating the 120, but use the various bits to build something new.

73 m/4

*** What would you build? An amp for an existing QRP rig? Or perhaps a computer controlled radio?

- Jerry Kaidor

EI3JU
07-22-2010, 03:31 PM
Email on the way to you, Jerry

KF6VB
07-22-2010, 03:54 PM
Hi Jerry,

I've owned and worked on a TS-120S for a few decades and more recently, a TS-130S. I fear that IF you can get it put back together, it won't play at all. These rigs, while being pretty good performers when working, are well-known for some problems. Most notably, solder connections tend to go bad after some time.

*** Curable with lots of quality soldering iron time.



the OEM connector housings and headers are unobtainium.


*** I *think* I have all the housings and headers. What I will surely need is some receptacle pins. Worst case,
can replace them with modern .1" header strips. I also
have a large collection of wires and sockets from a mid-90's vintage Sony TV - they are a different pattern, but somewhat higher quality than the Kenwood connectors.

One concern in this kind of work is the crappy phenolic circuit boards - they won't withstand much soldering stress.



Another big concern is Electrostatic Discharge. These rigs use many MOS devices


*** Yes, I noticed all the dual-gate MOSFETS. There are
7 of them. MOSFETS are complicated parts to substitute, because in addition to voltage rating, current rating, gain and capacitance, they also have a doping level that determines the quiescent point of the device. Enhancement mode? Depletion mode? Something inbetween? Hopefully, they're all OK. They are protected by their immediate circuitry, and if those parts aren't unsoldered...... Maybe I should go in and wrap a bit of bare wire around each MOSFET until it's time to test and troubleshoot.



But, nothing ventured, nothing gained. Who knows... it could work fine after you get it back together. If nothing else, it'd be good for parts.


*** The crystal filter alone is worth ten times what I paid for it.



I have the service manual online here (http://www.geocities.com/bswadener/TS130S/), along with selected pages rescanned, cleaned up, and printed to PDF format. You might find the main schematic to be much better than your copy.

*** My copy is actually pretty good. It's interesting to look at yours and see what changes were done to the 130.


Also of interest may be a spreadsheet that shows modern electrolytic capacitors that I sourced.

*** Your Excel is alas newer than mine :).



I have my 130 opened up right now (to fix another problem). If you'd like, I'll take photos - just say the word.


*** Please do. I would appreciate it greatly.

- Jerry Kaidor, KF6VB

W9GB
07-22-2010, 05:11 PM
One concern in this kind of work is the crappy phenolic circuit boards - they won't withstand much soldering stress.
CORRECT.

A good soldering station (true temperature controlled) and soldering techniques can make the job easier.

The quality of Japanese solder alloys (of that era) was usually poor.
I normally remove all (desoldering vacuum or solder wick) and use fresh Kester '44' 60/40 alloy on threse boards.

Since you have 0.100 headers (PC board thru-hole) for the connectors, you can use AMP/Tyco or Molex connectors.

Molex board to cable products are a good solution.
http://www.molex.com/molex/products/group?key=wire_to_board_connectors&channel=PRODUCTS&langPref=english
KK product
http://www.molex.com/molex/products/family?key=kk&channel=products&chanName=family&pageTitle=Introduction&parentKey=wire_to_board_connectors

Amp/Tyco offerings
http://www.tycoelectronics.com/catalog/menu/en/17718?BML=10576,17533

MTA 100
http://www.tycoelectronics.com/catalog/minf/en/692?BML=10576,17533,17718



w9gb

KF6VB
07-22-2010, 05:30 PM
For your amusement, here's a couple pix of the innards.

- Jerry KF6VB :cool:


http://www.tr2.com/ts120/top.jpg
http://www.tr2.com/ts120/bottom.jpg

KF6VB
07-22-2010, 06:14 PM
CORRECT.
A good soldering station (true temperature controlled) and soldering techniques can make the job easier.

*** I have a SMT rework station with a very good temperature controlled iron, as well as a couple of temp
controlled Wellers. I have been tempted by the Metcal irons at the flea market, but have not indulged yet. I do have a stereo microscope - have handled SMT devices down to 25-grid ( that was no fun ). Compared to that, this stuff is fairly pedestrian :). What soldering temp do you recommend?



The quality of Japanese solder alloys (of that era) was usually poor.
I normally remove all (desoldering vacuum or solder wick) and use fresh Kester '44' 60/40 alloy on threse boards.


*** You're obviously a patient man.



Since you have 0.100 headers (PC board thru-hole) for the connectors, you can use AMP/Tyco or Molex connectors.


*** I'll probably just use the snap-off headers that I already use for my homebrew PCB projects. Pretty sure there are crimp connectors available for those. The only disadvantage is they are not keyed, but I'll just put a dab of paint on one end.

- Jerry

W9GB
07-22-2010, 06:44 PM
What soldering temp do you recommend?
I like to stay in the range of 650 to 750 degrees F. for 60/40 solder.

IF you use the 63/37 eutectic alloy (no pasty state -- so rare to get cold solder joints due to heat issues, you can stay in the 650 to 700 degree F. range.

The "trick" is to use proper tip profile (e.g. screwdriver/chisel, single flat, conical) AND the proper tip size/mass (e.g. 1/16" to 5/32") for the wire/component and solder pad.

In this way -- you apply the minimal amount of heat (to minimize phenolic board issues) and heat wire/copper pad for solder applicaiton within 2 - 3 seconds. When the wire mass is grater than the solder pad -- I heat the wire FIRST, then move tip to pad (which will heat faster).

*** You're obviously a patient man.
IF you are going to do "crap" / sub-standard or unskiile dwork -- that is only wortha few centes and hour in Eastern Asia -- so you are over-qualified for work (welfare).
Do the skilled (quality) work that your global hourly wage indicates that you should be doing !!

The only disadvantage is they are not keyed, but I'll just put a dab of paint on one end.
Paint is one appraoch.
There are a few tricks to "key the connector".
IF it is a double row style -- you can use boxed header with an alignment key.

Never underestimate the usage of ribbon cable for some connections (if appropriate)

w9gb

WA7PRC
07-23-2010, 06:27 AM
Hi Jerry,

I was/am confused. The subject of this thread said TS-120S but your text said TS-130S. The photos you snapped show a TS-120S IF board (only two filter locations). So, I pulled the covers off my TS-120S and snapped photos. Click an image for a MUCH larger view:

Overall View, Top:
http://img210.imagevenue.com/loc245/th_65911_TS120S_Top_122_245lo.jpg (http://img210.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=65911_TS120S_Top_122_245lo.jpg)

Overall View, Bottom:
http://img225.imagevenue.com/loc780/th_65914_TS120S_Bottom_122_780lo.jpg (http://img225.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=65914_TS120S_Bottom_122_780lo.jpg)

AF-Generator PCBA (pn X49-1110-01):
http://img262.imagevenue.com/loc242/th_65918_TS120S_AF_Gen_X49_1110_01_122_242lo.jpg (http://img262.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=65918_TS120S_AF_Gen_X49_1110_01_122_ 242lo.jpg)

IF PCBA (pn X48-1210-01):
http://img259.imagevenue.com/loc165/th_65926_TS120S_IF_X48_1210_01_122_165lo.jpg (http://img259.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=65926_TS120S_IF_X48_1210_01_122_165l o.jpg)

PLL PCBA (pn X50-1490-00):
http://img151.imagevenue.com/loc196/th_65938_TS120S_PLL_X50_1490_00_122_196lo.jpg (http://img151.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=65938_TS120S_PLL_X50_1490_00_122_196 lo.jpg)

RF PCBA (pn X44-1260-01):
http://img142.imagevenue.com/loc228/th_65948_TS120S_RF_X44_1260_01_122_228lo.jpg (http://img142.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=65948_TS120S_RF_X44_1260_01_122_228l o.jpg)

The only post-processing I did was cropping-out of extraneous stuff. I left the covers off my rig (I don't use it nowadays) so, if you need more photos, I'll be happy to snap more.

My unit is unmodified with the exception of an added a buffer amplifier (bottom-side, next to the large electrolytic) to drive my Heath SB-620 'Scanalyzer' (panadapter). It picks up the IF signal at the IF board input.

Re: electrolytics. You should be able to use my list for the TS130 - just match the Kenwood PNs in the two BOMs (disregard the reference designators). Enjoy!

vy 73,
Bryan WA7PRC

PS: As always, should you or any of your IM force be caught or killed, the Secretary will disavow any knowledge of your actions. Good luck, Mr Phelps. This tape will self-destruct in five seconds. ;)

W9GB
07-23-2010, 07:30 AM
Those connectors are available (I will have to do a bit of research -- if I purchased from Mouser, DigiKey or Jameco).
I ordered them last year for a GE MVS option cable build (APRS usage).

w9gb

KF6VB
07-23-2010, 04:08 PM
Hi Jerry,

I was/am confused. The subject of this thread said TS-120S but your text said TS-130S.


*** It's a TS-120S. Culpa mea. Wow, those are GREAT pictures! Wonder if you could pull the cables aside on the bottom and snap the parts next to the big cap?

Also, the rear panel is pretty well apart. The 12V distribution stuff is totally apart and unsoldered ( and not well documented in the manual ). Sure would be nice if you could snap that area. If not, I'll understand. I know it's a bit more dissasembly than just the top and bottom covers.

At first, I thought the two fat wires from the final would come forward to go to the front panel switch, but now I realize that they are not switched, and I think they should just go across the rear compartment towards the protection zener.

Thanks again for those pictures.

- Jerry Kaidor KF6VB

WA7PRC
07-24-2010, 03:31 AM
*** It's a TS-120S. Culpa mea. Wow, those are GREAT pictures! Wonder if you could pull the cables aside on the bottom and snap the parts next to the big cap?

Also, the rear panel is pretty well apart. The 12V distribution stuff is totally apart and unsoldered ( and not well documented in the manual ). Sure would be nice if you could snap that area. If not, I'll understand. I know it's a bit more dissasembly than just the top and bottom covers.

At first, I thought the two fat wires from the final would come forward to go to the front panel switch, but now I realize that they are not switched, and I think they should just go across the rear compartment towards the protection zener.

Thanks again for those pictures.

- Jerry Kaidor KF6VB
Jerry,

You're welcome. It's not a real big deal to snap more photos. The parts next to the big capacitor is the buffer amplifier I made to drive my panadapter/bandscope. The info (schematic/BOM/photos) is here (http://www.geocities.com/bswadener/panadapter/). In the photos below, you'll see RG-174/U miniature coax cable snaking its way to the ACC DIN connector on the rear panel.

When you're in the back-end of the rig, you may want to watch out for the itty-bitty coax connectors and jacks - they appear to be kinda fragile. Also, these rigs are known for the relay contacts becoming intermittent. My 120 is OK but my 130 exhibited this problem. If you have a bad relay, you could remove the relay, peel the cover off and clean the contacts. But, it's just as easy to replace them (one on the IF Unit and one on the Filter Unit). Of course, the OEM unit is unobtanium but, there's a drop-in replacement made by Panasonic (pn NF4EB-12V). Digi-Key & Mouser both have them for about $12.50 each.

73,
Bryan WA7PRC

Filter PCBA (pn X51-1200-00):
http://img201.imagevenue.com/loc524/th_41303_TS120S_Filter_X51_1200_00_122_524lo.jpg (http://img201.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=41303_TS120S_Filter_X51_1200_00_122_ 524lo.jpg)

Final Unit (pn X56-1350-00):
http://img197.imagevenue.com/loc414/th_41306_TS120S_Final_X56_1350_00_122_414lo.jpg (http://img197.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=41306_TS120S_Final_X56_1350_00_122_4 14lo.jpg)

Rear View, Left:
http://img134.imagevenue.com/loc539/th_41309_TS120S_Rear_L_122_539lo.jpg (http://img134.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=41309_TS120S_Rear_L_122_539lo.jpg)

Rear View, Right:
http://img239.imagevenue.com/loc563/th_41311_TS120S_Rear_R_122_563lo.jpg (http://img239.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=41311_TS120S_Rear_R_122_563lo.jpg)

WA6ITF
07-25-2010, 03:56 AM
Most notably, solder connections tend to go bad after some time. I found this to be true when replacing all the electrolytics in my TS-130S. Even though I was very careful when disconnecting & reconnecting the connectors from the PCB headers, I wound-up with more than a few solder connections that had fractured. I found several others that had not had all the flux cooked out.

Sounds to me as if Kenwood used the same assembly line to build those PC boards as did Sony to fabricate the PC boards in its Type 2, 3/4" U-Matic Videocassette Recorders -- including thew VO-2000, 2600, 2800, 2850, 2860, etc. I spent my first 5 years at KTTV repairing the 40 or so of these machines we had there and the biggest failure was cold solder joints. When a machine came in with any complaint of an "intermittent" the standard operating procedure was to isolate the board at fault and then re-solder every connection.

In the case of a control of machine failure, you stood the machine on end, removed the bottom cover, and in front of you was the SY board. It measured about 11" x 18" and you just started in the upper left corner and soldered every connection to the lower right corner. About 4500 connections and 8 to 10 hours of work. But once you completed it, you never again would have an SY board failure caused by a cold or fractured solder joint. Servo lock problem? Re-solder the entire SV board. Intermittent audio? Res-solder the AU board, etc. Was I ever glad when the Type 2 machines went away and were replaced by BVU-800 series.

de WA6ITF

WA7PRC
07-25-2010, 04:44 AM
Sounds to me as if Kenwood used the same assembly line to build those PC boards as did Sony to fabricate the PC boards in its Type 2, 3/4" U-Matic Videocassette Recorders -- including thew VO-2000, 2600, 2800, 2850, 2860, etc. I spent my first 5 years at KTTV repairing the 40 or so of these machines we had there and the biggest failure was cold solder joints. When a machine came in with any complaint of an "intermittent" the standard operating procedure was to isolate the board at fault and then re-solder every connection.

In the case of a control of machine failure, you stood the machine on end, removed the bottom cover, and in front of you was the SY board. It measured about 11" x 18" and you just started in the upper left corner and soldered every connection to the lower right corner. About 4500 connections and 8 to 10 hours of work. But once you completed it, you never again would have an SY board failure caused by a cold or fractured solder joint. Servo lock problem? Re-solder the entire SV board. Intermittent audio? Res-solder the AU board, etc. Was I ever glad when the Type 2 machines went away and were replaced by BVU-800 series.

de WA6ITF
Oy! Maybe they did use the same fab house! Your tribulations sound much more extensive than mine, though.

Right now, my TS130S has a problem that I suspect to be caused by a bad solder joint(s). On 80m only, I've noticed "grass" on modulation peaks and noisy receive. I've narrowed it down to the PLL emitting a lot of 2nd harmonic energy. The fundamental is 12.578 MHz:
http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4134/4825947978_7cc5e2bd0f_m.jpg

There are 5 VCOs that are diode-isolated (Vcc is selectively applied by the bandswitch) and feed a common buffer amplifier. The output of the buffer passes through a 10 MHz high pass filter (with 8.83 MHz notch). The output from the 80m VCO looks clean. I haven't done any more investigation but I'm betting on a bad solder joint!

73,
Bryan WA7PRC

PS: Thanks for AR Newsline!

KF6VB
07-26-2010, 03:48 PM
Hello,

I have a first cut at a netlist spreadsheet. It is not complete, but is already quite useful. Here's a link:

http://www.tr2.com/ts-120/Wire-Harness.xlshttp://www.tr2.com/ts120/Wire-Harness.xls

The PO apparently had a roll of purple wire. All or most of the purple wires are his additions. So I have been removing purple wires as I find them.

I probably have to put this project on the back burner for now. It is just too much fun, and I have been neglecting other things that I need to do :).

- Jerry Kaidor KF6VB

KF6VB
07-26-2010, 04:01 PM
Jerry,
, there's a drop-in replacement made by Panasonic (pn NF4EB-12V). Digi-Key & Mouser both have them for about $12.50 each.


*** Don't suppose you know of a replacement for the relay on the separate relay board? The PO had popped off the cover and bent up the contacts a bit. This one is actually available from Kenwood, but its pricey.

- Jerry Kaidor

KF6VB
07-26-2010, 04:17 PM
Those connectors are available (I will have to do a bit of research -- if I purchased from Mouser, DigiKey or Jameco).


*** I would greatly appreciate it. All I really need is the pins. Thanks,

- Jerry Kaidor, KF6VB

W9GB
07-26-2010, 08:19 PM
*** Don't suppose you know of a replacement for the relay on the separate relay board? The PO had popped off the cover and bent up the contacts a bit. This one is actually available from Kenwood, but its pricey.
First, check with Ken, K4EAA web site on Kenwood Hybrids.
http://www.k4eaa.com/parts.htm
It is possible that Kenwood used same part (or same mfg.) -- and Ken has a substitute/replacement.

Kenwood and Yaesu used Omron relays during this period.
OMRON is still in business, large catalog of models --
ask a TS-130 owner for model number on the relay cover or photo !

w9gb

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