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NN4RH
02-11-2009, 11:42 AM
Anyone know what were the differences between the World Radio Labs Globe Scout 65, 65A and 65B models?

I've read the blurbs you can find at www.worldradiolabs.com and they mention the 65A had "improved metering circuit" and "new selector switch for crystal or VFO" but is that all there was to it?

As for any difference between 65B and 65A, they don't say, and that's what I'm primarily interested in.

KA4DPO
02-11-2009, 03:56 PM
I'm no expert but I think the primary difference between the 65A and B models was that the B had improved TVI shielding and filtering.

W4HAY
02-11-2009, 04:50 PM
The crystal/VFO switch is a definite improvement. Some crystal oscillator circuits become unstable when driven by a VFO.

KL7AJ
02-11-2009, 05:02 PM
Anyone know what were the differences between the World Radio Labs Globe Scout 65, 65A and 65B models?

I've read the blurbs you can find at www.worldradiolabs.com and they mention the 65A had "improved metering circuit" and "new selector switch for crystal or VFO" but is that all there was to it?

As for any difference between 65B and 65A, they don't say, and that's what I'm primarily interested in.


Send an email to this guy:
wa5etk@sbcglobal.net

Gene is a bit of a Globe guru.

eric

KA4DPO
02-11-2009, 05:08 PM
The crystal/VFO switch is a definite improvement. Some crystal oscillator circuits become unstable when driven by a VFO.

I know the original Globe Scout had a 6V6 oscillator that required a lot of drive. Unless you had a WRL or Hallicrafters VFO with high output you had to change the oscillator tube in order to drive it with lower power VFO's.

I also remember that it used frequency doubling on several bands and could be a harmonic generator without some filtering on the output.

I was eyeballing one in the 60's for my novice station, I wanted one bad but wound up with an Adventurer instead. The VFO wasn't an issue for me anyway since we couldn't use them but I remember reading a lot about the rig. Old Leo put a lot of hams on the air with that transmitter. Over all they were a real value at the time.

K9STH
02-11-2009, 07:14 PM
The original WRL Globe Scout 65 could match up to 2000 ohms (40:1 SWR) and was rated at 65 watts INPUT on CW and 55 watts INPUT on phone. It came out in 1954.

The WRL Globe Scout 65A was "improved" with the addition of "meter protection circuitry" and a switch was added for changing between VFO and crystal operation. However, the impedance range that the transmitter could match was dropped to 1000 ohms (20:1 SWR). The 65A came out in 1955

The WRL Globe Scout 65B was in the new "shadow" type cabinet (there was an "overhang" at the top of the cabinet over the front panel) and it also had additional shielding for TVI. It came out in 1956.

The 65B was replaced by the WRL Globe Scout 66 in 1957. All of the 65 and 66 series cover 160 through 10 meters.

At the same time as the model 66 WRL introduced the WRL Globe Scout 680. This was similar to the 66 except that it covered 80 through 6 meters. In 1958 WRL introduced the 680A which was similar to the 680 except that it had the "shadow" cabinet and additional shielding for TVI.

In 1960 WRL introduced the WRL Globe Scout Deluxe which was basically the same transmitter as the 680A except that it was in a much "fancier" cabinet and the power INPUT was upped to 90 watts on CW and 75 watts on phone.

The 65, 66, 680, and Deluxe series all used Heising plate modulation for phone operation.

I have never owned any of the Globe Scout transmitters but have worked on various versions over the years. I have owned both the WRL Globe Chief 90 and 90A models.

Glen, K9STH

KT4W
02-11-2009, 08:05 PM
A couple web sites that may give you a little info on WRL Globe Scouts and other WRL products.
www.amfone.net/tech/wrl (http://www.amfone.net/tech/wrl) World Radio Lab Product list
www.eht.com/oldradio/arrl/2006-11/Globe-65-article.htm (http://www.eht.com/oldradio/arrl/2006-11/Globe-65-article.htm)

I grew up in Council Bluffs and my father-in-law was a close friend of the chief engineer for WRL (Lee Treft). Both are now SK's. You might get a little info by doing a google search on Leo Meyerson (W0GFQ), the founder and owner of WRL. Leo is still living in Omaha and getting around at 95 years old. I went to high school with his son Larry, and my wife graduated from high school with his daughter Darlynn. My wife also worked on the assembly of Globe Scouts part time one summer during school vacation time. My father-in-law used a Globe King transmitter and a Hammerlund Super-Pro receiver.

W8JI
02-11-2009, 08:49 PM
Anyone know what were the differences between the World Radio Labs Globe Scout 65, 65A and 65B models?

I've read the blurbs you can find at www.worldradiolabs.com and they mention the 65A had "improved metering circuit" and "new selector switch for crystal or VFO" but is that all there was to it?

As for any difference between 65B and 65A, they don't say, and that's what I'm primarily interested in.

I have all of those models.

My favorite is the 65A.

http://www.w8ji.com/globe_scout_page.htm



The changes between them are pretty much as outlined, but the performance claims advertised like matching range are just not true at all. You can pretty much just ignore the advertised matching range specs, because they have no basis in fact. As a matter of fact none of the models do well at all with 50 ohm loads on 80 or 160 because they don't have enough C in the networks, and they certainly can't go anywhere even remotely near the upper impedances specified. If you look I added a fixed mica cap for 40-10 on the loaded, and on 80 and 160 I can screw in external padding caps to let the network match ~50 ohm loads.

The most worthwhile addition was the VFO switch that appeared in the A and B, the addtional TVI or harmonic filtering certainly doesn't show in the units I have.

The drive power required from the VFO is very high, as was pointed out. You can also fracture crystals if you aren't lucky. :-)

The 65A is one of my favorties because it was the first commercial rig I ever owned. My dad bought me one when I passed my general and I have fond memories of going to the New York Central Railway Express depot in Toledo to pick mine up. Favorite doesn't mean it is good, just that I love it in spite of its blemishes. :-)

73 Tom

KA4DPO
02-11-2009, 09:30 PM
I have all of those models.

My favorite is the 65A.

http://www.w8ji.com/globe_scout_page.htm



The changes between them are pretty much as outlined, but the performance claims advertised like matching range are just not true at all. You can pretty much just ignore the advertised matching range specs, because they have no basis in fact. As a matter of fact none of the models do well at all with 50 ohm loads on 80 or 160 because they don't have enough C in the networks, and they certainly can't go anywhere even remotely near the upper impedances specified. If you look I added a fixed mica cap for 40-10 on the loaded, and on 80 and 160 I can screw in external padding caps to let the network match ~50 ohm loads.

The most worthwhile addition was the VFO switch that appeared in the A and B, the addtional TVI or harmonic filtering certainly doesn't show in the units I have.

The drive power required from the VFO is very high, as was pointed out. You can also fracture crystals if you aren't lucky. :-)

The 65A is one of my favorties because it was the first commercial rig I ever owned. My dad bought me one when I passed my general and I have fond memories of going to the New York Central Railway Express depot in Toledo to pick mine up. Favorite doesn't mean it is good, just that I love it in spite of its blemishes. :-)

73 Tom

I believe you because that's very similar to my Bandmaster. I have to add a significant amount of capacitance to load it on 80 meters. The Bandmaster wasn't designed to operate on 160 but it can with some modification. I suspect WRL like other manufacturers kept prices low by cutting some corners on components.

W8JI
02-12-2009, 12:27 AM
I believe you because that's very similar to my Bandmaster. I have to add a significant amount of capacitance to load it on 80 meters. The Bandmaster wasn't designed to operate on 160 but it can with some modification. I suspect WRL like other manufacturers kept prices low by cutting some corners on components.

It has a ~365 uuF loading capacitor and plate tuning capacitor. Even with the L section between the regular and "doublet" connectors on the back in use there is no way possible to match the impedance range claimed. It is especially limited on 160, where you can't ever load 50 ohms.

Many rigs were like that, although Johnson and Heath were two of the exceptions. They had enough C to work properly on 160 and 80.

73 Tom

NN4RH
02-12-2009, 03:19 AM
Thanks for all the information.

The Globe Scout 65A was the transmitter I had as a Novice in 1972 at age 16. I remember I paid $15 cash for it and somehow got it home about a mile balanced on the handlebars of my bicycle.

I've been looking to relive my youth and find one to restore and was wondering if the three models were close enough that I wouldn't notice the difference. From what I hear, I think that's the case.

W8JI
02-12-2009, 10:55 AM
Thanks for all the information.

The Globe Scout 65A was the transmitter I had as a Novice in 1972 at age 16. I remember I paid $15 cash for it and somehow got it home about a mile balanced on the handlebars of my bicycle.

I've been looking to relive my youth and find one to restore and was wondering if the three models were close enough that I wouldn't notice the difference. From what I hear, I think that's the case.

That is the case, but you are also in luck. The 65A is the most common.

Now what you really need to do is find a bike first. I kept looking for a NYC RR baggage car on eBay, but couldn't afford one big enough to bring my 65A home. You are lucky you only need a bike.

One word of caution, don't try to collect a cheerleader or girl in bobbie sock and poodle skirt to fully re-live your youth. That's illegal. :-)

KB5JO
10-27-2010, 04:52 PM
I recently acquired a 680, which maybe is nearly a 65B. There is a VFO/Xtal switch on the back that shorts the oscillator cathode choke when in the VFO position. The manual barely mentions the switch. If anyone has ever used a VFO with this rig, would appreciate knowing how this is accomplished.

I own an Eico 722 VFO, use with an Eico 723, which doesn't have a switch. Plug the 722 output into the 723 crystal socket, turn on the VFO to spot, turn the 723 to transmit, key the 723. Going to standby is the reverse.
What does the switch on the 680 accomplish?

73, Curt KB5JO

KE9EX
10-27-2010, 07:35 PM
"Old Leo put a lot of hams on the air with that transmitter."

I am one. I didn't get on the air until I gave up homebrewing a XMTR
(after an unfortunate FIRE) and used my lawn mowing money for a Globe Scout 680A. I could have walked it home from the store. I wouldn't have dared tried my bicycle! Fortunately Dad drove me there and back and I was on the air
with the Globe Scout and Hallicrafters S-40 that evening. Summer of 1967.

K9STH
10-27-2010, 07:46 PM
Restarting this thread instead of starting a new one almost caused its deletion.

Now, as for JO's question:

Not actually looking at the schematic of the WRL Globe Scout 680, but having a WRL Globe Chief 90A as well as having worked on a lot of "boat anchor" transmitters, what the VFO/XTAL switch usually does is to short out an r.f. choke in the cathode circuit of the crystal oscillator tube. This is done so that there is no chance of the oscillator stage "taking off" when the VFO is used.

To use a VFO you put the switch in the VFO position and then connect the VFO to the crystal jack on the transmitter. You need to make sure that the plug from the VFO is inserted correctly into the crystal jack. One side of the cable from the VFO is going to go to the shield which is grounded at the VFO end. One side of the crystal jack is normally grounded and you have to make sure that the connection to the shield of the cable goes to the ground side of the crystal socket. Otherwise, the output from the VFO is going to be shorted to ground.

The Globe Scout 680 came out in 1957 when it was "assumed" that virtually all amateur radio operators had an understanding of how various circuits worked (there were questions on the license examinations which definitely required technical "know how" even for Novice Class licenses). Therefore, the majority of operating manuals "back then" were pretty much lacking where things that were considered "general knowledge" were concerned. Today that knowledge is not necessarily held by many amateur radio operators resulting in a lot of questions being asked.

Glen, K9STH

WA9CWX
10-28-2010, 06:37 PM
Yes Glen, but we don't talk about that anymore......Seems to offend.......:D

Vote me in as one who owned a 65A, but later, I was a General. Used it with crystals only, As I recall, I don't remember why....I did have, and still have, a 722, same one after all these years, works fine...)

NN4RH
11-17-2010, 12:02 AM
Restarting this thread instead of starting a new one almost caused its deletion.

I never understood that policy of deleting old threads that are revived.

Old threads can come back for good reasons - for example, the information in the thread is suddenly relevant to someone new, such that it makes sense to continue or elaborate on the discussion, such as this thread. Or someone may have new information to offer to an older thread or a solution to a problem or question that wasn't adaquately answered the first time around.

I understand that you don't want people to make antique threads keep coming back just for the sake of bringing them back to annoy the moderators, but why delete them? That removes potentially useful archival information.

Why not just lock the thread, if it's "too old", instead of deleting it?

And while we're at it, how old is too old?

W8JI
11-17-2010, 11:24 AM
I never understood that policy of deleting old threads that are revived.

Old threads can come back for good reasons - for example, the information in the thread is suddenly relevant to someone new, such that it makes sense to continue or elaborate on the discussion, such as this thread. Or someone may have new information to offer to an older thread or a solution to a problem or question that wasn't adequately answered the first time around.

I understand that you don't want people to make antique threads keep coming back just for the sake of bringing them back to annoy the moderators, but why delete them? That removes potentially useful archival information.

Why not just lock the thread, if it's "too old", instead of deleting it?

And while we're at it, how old is too old?

I agree 100%. The concept of deleting old but technically useful threads is very odd to me. It is like undoing something valuable just to undo it.

I'm not even sure about locking them, because sometimes old threads reach wrong conclusions. Once locked, they cannot be corrected or updated.

It's a case by case, but clearly blanket deletion makes very little sense. Neither does locking to me.

W0VT
12-05-2010, 05:15 PM
I have one each of the above transmitters.

All have rough front panels. Does anyone on here know of someone presently doing silk screening for these panels?

I may have to do it myself if nobody else is doing it.

Lee, w0vt

W9GB
12-05-2010, 05:39 PM
I have one each of these transmitters, WRL Globe Scout 40A, 65, and 65A. All have rough front panels.
Does anyone know someone who is presently performing silk screen work for these WRL panels?
I may have to do it myself if nobody else is doing it.
Lee -

I am not aware of anyone performing silk screen work, specifically for the World Radio Lab (WRL) equipment (Globe Scouts).
I would suggest htat you contact WA5CMI.
http://www.qsl.net/wa5cmi/boatanch.htm#GK500

He did a wonderful restoration in 1999 on the WRL Globe King 500, that tooks 100 hours of labor.
His WRL Globe King 500 started out as a bucket of rust. (Photos attached)
http://www.qsl.net/wa5cmi/gk500.htm

Dee, W4PNT recently retired from performing silk screen work for many radio restorers.
According to recent postings on AMForum,
http://amfone.net/Amforum/index.php?topic=21682.0

Chuck Hurley, K1TLI is continuing Dee's work with E.F. Johnson equipment.
http://www.qrz.com/db/k1tli

Howard Mills, W3HM phone: 304-876-6483 w3hm@frontiernet.net laregly works/restores Collins equipment.

George Runyan, WB6YEC supposedly was also performing this work on E.F. Johnson equipment.

You might want to post the question on the AMFone.net .

w9gb

W8JI
12-06-2010, 12:39 AM
I have one each of the above transmitters.

All have rough front panels. Does anyone on here know of someone presently doing silk screening for these panels?

I may have to do it myself if nobody else is doing it.

Lee, w0vt

I screened my own panels. I still have the screen for the 65A. I reckon it cost me about $150 per panel to refinish them, when I did four panels. My total cost was about $600 to setup and buy all materials.


http://www.w8ji.com/images/Boatanchors/Globe%20Scout/Globe-front-top1.jpg


http://www.w8ji.com/globe_scout_page.htm

K1ZJH
12-06-2010, 03:32 AM
That panel came out very nice, Tom.

The layout looks identical to my 40A. What did WRL change
in the later models?

Pete

K1ZJH
12-06-2010, 03:34 AM
I have one each of the above transmitters.

All have rough front panels. Does anyone on here know of someone presently doing silk screening for these panels?

I may have to do it myself if nobody else is doing it.

Lee, w0vt

If find you someone, post the info here. My 40A is missing paint in a few
areas. Touching it up wouldn't look right.

Pete

W3ETF
12-07-2010, 12:47 AM
Back in 1958 I bought a brand new GlobeScout 680A and a HQ-100 from WRL. That transmitter would load up on anything. One night when my antenna blew down in a wind storm, I hooked it to my bed springs and worked a station in indiana. I lived in Pennsylvania at that time and still do. I can imagine what the swr was. good thing it was after television signed off. Back then they went off the air around one in the morning. I didnt have too much tvi with it even in the evenings when i would go on. I remember one afternoon I hooked it up to my tv antenna and worked a few stations on six meters but they were about 3 to 5 miles from me as the crow flies. They said i had great audio. I used a D104 with it. I did alot of wheeling and dealing with WRL thru out my ham career. They were easy to work with trading or buying ham equipment. It sure was a nice time to be a ham.

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