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KI4PJY
09-05-2008, 01:14 AM
Has anyone tried to run coax under a window? I have seen ribbon like cables for RG 6 (cable TV coax) but not for RG 58. I thought about trying 2 insulated copper strips with the center conductor attached to one and the braid another? Or using ladder line by attaching a copper strip to each conductor and transition to RG 58 inside the shack to the tuner. I do not want to drill holes in the wall or use the wooden insert available from MFJ which allows the coax or ladder line pass through into the shack.
Any suggestions will be appreciated.
Heyward
KI4PJY:confused:

ZL3GSL
09-05-2008, 01:52 AM
Window line would be a bad idea, especially if the window frame is metal. :D You could probably make a flat 50 ohm "coaxial" cable with three lengths of copper strip and two of insulation, but it would probably finish up with a thickness near to the diameter of RG58. :(

I'd just use a foam weather seal strip of appropriate thickness to bring the coax under the window. That will work.

N3QVB
09-05-2008, 01:57 AM
I'm using the MFJ Window Feed-Through Panel.
http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-4603

It works great.

K8JD
09-05-2008, 02:01 AM
Just go ahead and drill the hole, 1/4 inch will be easy to fill in when you come up with a better idea !

N1KON
09-05-2008, 02:05 AM
I have a 2x4 fitted to the window painted white to match with holes drilled in the 2x4 works great. just make sure you put something inside at the top of the window so someone cant open it from the outside.
Jerry

KI4SYC
09-05-2008, 02:08 AM
I'm using the MFJ Window Feed-Through Panel.
http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-4603

It works great.

It works? Is there any difference noted in using it or just running the coax/wires directly? Any noise introduced by using it? Just curious as I would like to try one also. Oh...any bugs crawl in? Is it drafty?

KE0CU
09-05-2008, 02:23 AM
Like K8JD said. I have drilled many holes through the outside walls of my house (< 0.5 inch) and later patched them. Not at all noticable and very convenient.

K0RGR
09-05-2008, 02:35 AM
If you can find a way to get the cable into the house, you can run the cable up through a floor by pushing it up next to a furnace/AC vent. If your house has a crawl space under it instead of a basement, this should be fairly easy. If not, you can consider installing a 'dummy' outdoor electrical outlet box on an outside wall. In the box, you can have one end of a long UHF bulkhead connector that will let you screw a PL-259 onto either end. These come in various lengths - it should not be hard to find one that will pass through the wall. Here's a 12 inch one: http://shop.vetcosurplus.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=7248

There are lots of different boxes to choose from.

WA4BRL
09-05-2008, 03:35 AM
The MFJ feedthrough panel is way overpriced for this simple task. And if you use it, you'll have to seal the gaps it leaves at the below the sash as well as between the two sashes halfway up the window. Instead, consider this method: Drill through the bottom of the lower sash and instal a UG363-x bukhead connector.

http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o354/wa4brl/window2-1.jpg
Window sash with coax & ground feedthroughs (also good for going through walls)


http://www.universal-radio.com/CATALOG/parts/2795.jpg
UG363-2 (photo courtesy Universal-Radio.com)


See various lengths of these connectors at HERE (http://www.universal-radio.com/CATALOG/parts/ug363.html) Order one that is about two inches longer than your sash thickness. This method allows you to keep the window fully closed so you don't have to worry about air or rain intrusion. You can install as many as you need. As mentioned by K8JD, you can fill the hole(s) later. Of course, you aren't limited to using the window sash. You can order longer ones and go straight through the exterior wall wherever it is most convenient. Wherever you install them, you get a very neat, efficient, and easily sealed feedthrough.

Wherever you put them, add a smaller hole and install a length of threaded rod to bring in your ground connection.

NA0AA
09-05-2008, 06:05 AM
I had my coax going thru a sliding glass door for two years - had to wire the door handle to lock it....used foam insulation for water pipe to block drafts.

Another choice: Replace the window with a plastic panel and drill as many holes as you need for feed-thrus of any sort, then replace the glass when you move/sell/whatever.

I put a metal panel into a window so as to install 12 lightning arrestors and the SPG connection, but 1/8" thick aluminum don't transmit light so good, if ya know what I mean!

Personally, I'd go with the MFJ unit because you can take it out later leaving NO holes to repair - use some closed cell foam 'backer rod' to seal that gap between the two sashes and install a wood brace to keep the window from being opened and you are good to go.

K8DLM
09-05-2008, 11:09 AM
My dad did this to run his antenna wire through and I also do it and have no problems with it.

W4HAY
09-05-2008, 12:16 PM
Is this for HF under 100 Watts? If so you could use a few inches of insulated wire to pass under the window sash. Just make sure the outside splice is weatherproof. For that short difference, the electrons will never know the difference.

KI4TWB
09-05-2008, 01:50 PM
I'm using the MFJ Window Feed-Through Panel.
http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-4603

It works great.

I built one for the cost of three barrel connectors. Had a few pieces of scrap 1/2" pine sitting around...

KI4SPB
09-05-2008, 09:58 PM
I picked up a piece of "trex" at the local hardware, plastic and wood composite, 1"x11/2"x31". Won't rot and can be painted to match.Cut to length, drill your holes and insert your bulkheads. apply weather stripping and insert.

WB2WIK
09-05-2008, 10:08 PM
Yes, coax will run under Windows, but if you ever need tech support you could have problems.

I run my coax under Linux.:p

K9XR
09-05-2008, 10:12 PM
Yes, coax will run under Windows, but if you ever need tech support you could have problems.

I run my coax under Linux.:p

I heard it will run only under XP or newer versions.

WB2WIK
09-05-2008, 10:18 PM
I heard it will run only under XP or newer versions.

::XP has a 2TB limit for storage. I store way more than that in my coax, had to go to Server 2008.

G7GPL
09-05-2008, 10:26 PM
Don't mess about ...... Get a hole in your wall.;)

If you are going to put a hole into your wall make sure that you have a large enough one for more cables if you should need them. So don't half do the job.!

What I am saying is that nothing short of the type of drill illustrated will suffice. They will not even charge you for visiting.

Only problem I can see is that the frequency for calling IR seems to be unknown.??? (but try 27 MHz :rolleyes:)


Nick, G7GPL

http://www.moonbase99.it/Thunderbirds/images/Thunderbird-mole-01.jpg

WA4BRL
09-06-2008, 02:48 AM
I don't understand this obsession with fabricating a separate panel out of wood, aluminum, or trex to place under the windowsill. Once placed under the window sill and sealed, it still leaves an unsightly overlap between the upper and lower sashes and a large gap between them that must be sealed against wind rain and insects. OK, seriously now, there ARE ubdoubtedly situations where drilling through the sash in impractical. But if you can do it, just go ahead.

Simply drill through the lower (or even side) portion of the sash itself (or an exterior wall). The holes are easily filled later, and after a bit of paint, will look like new.

http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o354/wa4brl/window.jpg http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o354/wa4brl/window2a.jpg

One worthy enhancement is to add a metal plate to the outside for all the bulkhead connectors (and threaded rod for the ground) to go through. When the nuts are tightened against the plate, it ties all the coax shields to ground.

If you've installed the plate, fabricate some shorted SO-239's to place in the connectors when you unplug your indoor coax runs. This grounds all your antenna systems -- center conductor AND ground. This is great during thunderstorms.

WB2WIK
09-06-2008, 02:19 PM
I don't understand this obsession with fabricating a separate panel out of wood, aluminum, or trex in which to place under the windowsill. Once placed under the window sill and sealed, it still leaves an unsightly overlap between the upper and lower sashes and a large gap between them that must be sealed against wind rain and insects. OK, seriously now, there ARE ubdoubtedly situations where drilling through the sash in impractical. But if you can do it, just go ahead.

Simply drill through the lower (or even side) portion of the sash itself. The holes are easily filled later, and after a bit of paint, will look like new.

http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o354/wa4brl/window.jpg http://i340.photobucket.com/albums/o354/wa4brl/window2a.jpg

One worthy enhancement is to add a metal plate to the outside for all the bulkhead connectors (and threaded rod for the ground) to go through. When the nuts are tightened against the plate, it ties all the coax shields to ground.

If you've installed the plate, fabricate some shorted SO-239's to place in the connectors when you unplug your indoor coax runs. This grounds all your antenna systems -- center conductor AND ground. This is great during thunderstorms.

::To be serious, I've tried all those "window" methods and thought they were all terrible because they bring in feedlines at about hip height where they are highly visible and look ugly. I always resort back to drilling holes down very low, close to floor level, so the cables come into the shack just above the floor, behind the desk or benches, and cannot be seen at all -- from inside or outside the house.

WB2WIK/6

WA4BRL
09-07-2008, 10:33 PM
::To be serious, I've tried all those "window" methods and thought they were all terrible because they bring in feedlines at about hip height where they are highly visible and look ugly. I always resort back to drilling holes down very low, close to floor level, so the cables come into the shack just above the floor, behind the desk or benches, and cannot be seen at all -- from inside or outside the house.

WB2WIK/6
I gladly concede the point. Indeed, I mentioned the option of going through the wall in my first post -- just didn't point out the advantages of floor level.

KD5ZPG
09-07-2008, 11:23 PM
::To be serious, I've tried all those "window" methods and thought they were all terrible because they bring in feedlines at about hip height where they are highly visible and look ugly. I always resort back to drilling holes down very low, close to floor level, so the cables come into the shack just above the floor, behind the desk or benches, and cannot be seen at all -- from inside or outside the house.

X2

While most of my cabling goes up the wall, into the attic and out a vent.........I do have one in the location you describe drilled through the wall. It makes for a clean installation.


KD5ZPG

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