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WA2ZDY
02-10-2008, 02:27 PM
Yep, it's a must-have down here where the wind is known to blow in circles.

I know Honda is very highly regarded quality wise. I can get an EU2000 - the inverter type 2kw peak/1.6kw continuous for $992. Very quiet and fuel efficient - very good features.

I'm not afraid of the price but I wonder if I can get more power for the money and still have reasonable quality? What other worthwhile brand names are there? Obviously the 5kw generators at Big Lots for $199 are out of the question. Ya get what you pay for fits here!

But Sam's and Home Depot have bigger generators for less. Any thoughts?

Thanks.

K9YLI
02-10-2008, 02:56 PM
Depends on your expected usage.

as standby for you house, then I would go with a 4500 or 5000 that has 240 capability.
In case you have a well. you need the 240.

since as standby you wont run it that much over 10 or 20 years, there are
many quality gen sets in the 600/700 range with 240 output.

except for a 'daily use' contractors gen set, I would lnot bother with

"honda" quality. I have a MW 1kw I have had for 35 years.
It likely has 40 hours on it. several power outages and some "filed" work
where it is easier to take it than string out cords.
I also have a 4500 Kohler in the motor home which I may try and rewire to 220 as I think it is 2 2500 Kohler alternators coils in parallel

which could be swapped with a plug arrangement.

I do have a well to run...

K5PHW
02-10-2008, 02:57 PM
Buy the Honda. If you can, buy the 3000. You won't regret it.

I have been in the outdoor power equipment industry a little over thirty years.
I have seen a lot of junk sold. I own a Honda. ;)



73 Clyde

KC9ECI
02-10-2008, 03:11 PM
I have a Coleman 4 cycle, 2500 watt portable unit and it is the dirtiest thing you have ever heard on RF.

KE7RFL
02-10-2008, 03:27 PM
I bought a Yamaha EF6600DEC a few years back. I've been very happy with it... using it for starting diesel engines to providing power from the back of a pickup truck. Electric start, 6,000 watt, 120V/240V. At full load, it will run 8 hours on one 5-gallon fillup.

I bought the tri-fuel kit (propane/natural gas/gasoline), but never installed it.

Around $2,000 on eBay. Be sure to get the wheel kit.. this puppy is heavy! Also.. heavy-gauge extension cords are a big plus. I bought some 8 and 10 gauge cords at the local Big R farm supply.

K8ERV
02-10-2008, 03:37 PM
Just make sure it has a crank for your XYL when it runs outta gas----

TOM K8ERV Montrose Colo

AB8XA
02-10-2008, 03:43 PM
We have a pair of EU2000s (http://www.luffshack.com/Honda/) we use to power our Airstream travel trailer when boondocking. We got them from Mayberrys in NJ (http://www.mayberrys.com/honda/generator/html/maingenerator.htm) and chose them over the EU3000 because our air-conditioner service manual calls for 3500 watts minimum, and because I can lift them into the 4x4 truck bed one at a time. They weigh about 54 pounds each fueled, where the EU3000 weighs over 150 pounds fueled, in part because of the battery and electric starter the EU2000s don't have. They are amazingly quiet and that counts a lot in a campground or at the docks, where those with noisy contractor-type generators are sometimes asked to leave.

We seldom lose power, but when we do, the EU2000s will run the refrigerator and sump pump, but they can't be run in series to get 240VAC for the furnace, etc. But backup isn't their primary use--portability and quiet is. I'd opt for a larger, electric start model for serious home backup requiring 240VAC. If I were serious about home backup, I'd also be running my furnace, water heater, and range off gas, rather than the electric we have now.

W2BBQ
02-10-2008, 03:49 PM
Generac is another industry standard unit for high quality.

The only feature I can recommend you get is one with Automatic Idle Control, that is, when not having a load applied, the engine will idle down. Most units do NOT have this feature and the thing runs full speed all the time. Big waste of fuel, unnecessary noise and wear & tear.

good luck

K5PHW
02-10-2008, 04:04 PM
I will give Generac a decent grade. They build for several private labels.
Briggs and Stratton being one. We sold over 500 units during the 2007
ice storms here. Very few problems so far. They are a bit noisy though.


73 Clyde

W5HTW
02-10-2008, 04:07 PM
I have a ten year or so old Craftsman 3800 pull start generator. I originally got it to run a welder in the back of the truck. Later, after I had done all the welding I would need to do, I sold the welder.

This generator has powered my house, as long as I keep the electric water heater turned off. That includes the furnace and the start-up of the refrigerator. It also powers my well, but not at the same time as the house. I have jumpers I can disconnect from the house and attach to the well control system, and pump water into the 85 gallon pressure tank. When pressure is up, then I disconnect and go back to the house.

It has one 240 VAC outlet and two 120 VAC outlets, plus one 12 VDC outlet. Fairly heavy but on a good day (for me) I can lift it and put it into the truck still. Most days I am not that strong, so I have a ramp I slide it up. I don't have the wheels for it. Should have got them.

It is electronically regulated, with screwdriver adjustment to put the 120 and 240 vac exactly where they should be. It has the idle down during non use, but even a 40 watt light bulb will kick it back up to full speed. Supposed to run about 8 hours on a full tank.

Point? I don't know who made the Craftsman generators. But this one is very well made, not nearly as quiet running as the Hondas and similar, but it has been totally reliable. Whoever made them, I recommend this type of generator strongly. New it was about 700 or so.

I don't use it for ham radio operation, so can't comment on how noisy, electrically, it might be.

Good luck.

ed

KC9ECI
02-10-2008, 04:39 PM
The other weekend during Winter Field day, we used my generator just long enough to top off the 12V deep cycle and recharge the laptops. Other than that, if it was running it wiped out all of HF. Mike, N0EXE had a small 850 watt 2 cycle generator that he'd picked up at Menards on sale, and it was just as noisy on HF. I'd like to find on old battery from something like a Crown pallet jack that still has a little life in it and use that for my battery backup and only use the generator in a pinch.

K1VSK
02-10-2008, 04:58 PM
Yep, it's a must-have down here where the wind is known to blow in circles.

I know Honda is very highly regarded quality wise. I can get an EU2000 - the inverter type 2kw peak/1.6kw continuous for $992. Very quiet and fuel efficient - very good features.

I'm not afraid of the price but I wonder if I can get more power for the money and still have reasonable quality? What other worthwhile brand names are there? Obviously the 5kw generators at Big Lots for $199 are out of the question. Ya get what you pay for fits here!

But Sam's and Home Depot have bigger generators for less. Any thoughts?

Thanks.


Just bought a Honda 2000i from an online source for $870 delivered (no tax, no shipping). You might want to check around but that's the best price I found. I did quite a bit of research on comparable brands and prices and that convined me to get the Honda. I have absolutely no interest in the company from which I bought mine and only interested in seeing another ham not get screwed - would be happy to share the info if you want it - just mail me offline.
Don/K1VSK

W2BBQ
02-10-2008, 05:05 PM
I hear ya on the noise. Most generators are designed to deliver raw power and have no or little filtering.

So add a filter!

It may be as simple as placing a large capacitor of the appropriate rating across the output.

Otherwise, I'm sure one the electronic gurus on here could point you to a filtering circuit on the web somewhere or design one for you.

There may even be ready to go plug in power line conditioners available tha we perform this function for you.


good luck

WD8RWI
02-10-2008, 05:10 PM
I have had several different generators that I have used for many different purposes and have determined several important considerations.

First, the wattage ratings of the generator and the horsepower rating of the engine are often wildly optimistic. By this I mean the Horsepower rating of the engine is not nearly enough to produce the wattage claimed for the generator. To determine if the wattage and horsepower rating are appropriate, divide the wattage rating of the generator by 746 watts/horsepower and then multiply the result by 2 (50% efficiency) and the horsepower rating of the engine should be close to this number. For instance, for a 5000 watt generator, you divide 5000 by 746 to get 6.56 Hp. Now multiply this by 2 because the efficiency of the engine power to wattage output is certainly not any greater than 50% and is probably lower and you get 13.12 HP. So the engine for a 5000 watt generator should be, at least, 13 horsepower and, preferably about 15 horsepower. I have found some 5000 watt generators with engines rated as low as 8 HP. Now for the bad news. You will not find a generator that really has enough horsepower to produce the rated wattage continuosly unless you are willing to pay some big bucks. I found a Coleman 16 HP, 5000 watt generator for only about $12,000.00 so, if you want, go and get it. So, get the most horsepower that you can afford.

Second, unless you intend to use this generator for purposes where there is substantial periods of time when absolutely no power is required from the generator, the automatic idle feature is unnecessary. For instance, if you are using this as an emergency backup for your house, there will ALWAYS be some power drain on the generator and the generator will be running at full RPM.

Third, whatever else you do, GET AN ELECTRIC START generator. I you have ever tried to start a gasoline engine at sub-freezing temperatures, you will know why I say this. Even with electric start, you will probably find you need starter fluid so have some on hand.

Fourth, always start up your generator at least every 6 months or oftener and apply an electrical load to the generator. This will help ensure that the generator will start when you need it and that the generator still has the residual magnetism to "bootstrap" itself.

Fifth, make sure you get a generator that has a "low oil shut down" feature. We are not always as good as we should be about checking the engine oil level and you don't want to ruin your engine.

I have used Generac's, Briggs and Stratton's, Hondas and several other brands and have found them all to be quite reliable and functional.

So get on the internet and investigate all the generators out there and I am sure that you will find one to suit your needs

WA8RTI
02-10-2008, 08:26 PM
Stay away from Coleman Powermate if you want to use it to power electronic equipment. The generator has brushes instead of taking power off a rotating field. That makes for a very noisy electrical output. It is fine for powering lights, pumps, furnaces, refrigerators, etc. I went for cheap when I bought my Coleman 5 kW at Sam's club. It did its job for a rural home in providing heat, lights, water,etc. during Ohio Edison's many power outages. But if I had to do it over, I would go for something also rated to power computers, radios, etc. Also the Coleman motor is a Tecumsah that can wake the dead at 50 ft.-very loud. I have heard generators with Honda engines-very quiet. EDIT: I've had my Powermate about 9 or 10 years, perhaps now they have a rotating field power rather than brushes -but I would check before buying. In addition to being electrically noisey, brushes will need replacement at some point.

KC9ECI
02-10-2008, 09:11 PM
Where were you 8 years ago when I bought the thing!?!

The club I did my first field day with has a generator that came over on the Mayflower. No compression, pull start, and works great as long as you check the gas and fill it with oil often. They filtered with UPS (Uninterruptible power supply) battery back-up's. Seems to have worked. So far I've been too cheap to buy one and give it a try. There was a pile of them on a pallet from an outdoor vender at Dayton last year and I'm still kicking myself for not buying a couple of them.

WA2ZDY
02-10-2008, 09:30 PM
Well fellas, I thank you all for your input. The Honda 2000 for 870 is sure worth looking into. $122 in my pocket is better than in the cash drawer at the Honda dealer down the street.

K5PHW, would you email me please Clyde? Your email is not listed. I'm "mycall"@yahoo.com.

I see Generac has a 5kw job for "around" $1000 and I'm sure that's what I've seen at Sam's. Being able to keep the fridge cold would be a big plus and the Honda 2kw won't do that.

RTI, as for sub-zero, I'm in Florida! But electric start will still be a plus as my wife will be starting it. I'm not physically able.

Ok, I have more to think about. Thanks again for all!

K5PHW
02-11-2008, 12:11 AM
I'd be glad to Chris. Done deal. :)




73 Clyde

AI4IJ
02-11-2008, 12:19 AM
I purchased a McCulloch FG-2000 Tc portable digital inverter generator (the equivalent of the Honda EU-2000) as a reconditioned unit on ebay for $356.00, plus $50.00 shipping.

It's very quiet, very energy efficient with its "Smart Throttle" feature that raises and lowers engine RPM in response to load requirements, and provides clean pure sine wave output at up to 2KW peak, 1.6KW continuous. At 1/4 load, it will provide up to 13 hours of power. At full output, about 4 hours on a 1.3 gallon tank.

It weighs less than 50 pounds with no fuel.

It is manufactured by Kipor and also marketed under that name as the KGE-2000Ti for about $600 - $700, or so, new.

It provides all the emergency power I need to run the refrigerator, battery chargers, lights, or any combination of appliances up to 13A continuous at 120VAC.

I've been very pleased with mine. Always starts on one pull.

73
Richard
AI4IJ

AB8UG
02-11-2008, 12:53 AM
I bought an Onan 6.5KVA and am very happy with it. It has an electric start 14 horse motor made by Onan. I checked the output wave form with my scope and it looked very clean. They aren't cheap though. $2,200. I wanted something reliable that my wife could start. She needs power for her cpap machine so she can sleep. I live in a semi rural area and need power for heat and water. Hot water heat doesn't like ice in its pipes.:D

73

KA0GKT
02-11-2008, 02:04 AM
Consider getting a generator which is fueled by something other than gasoline. Unleaded gasoline gets old rather quickly and a unit like agenerator ought to be stored without any fuel in the tank, fuel line or carbuerator bowl.

If a liquid fuel is a must, consider a generator fueled by diesel, however if you happen to live in an area where natural gas is available, there are a number of good natural gas and LP gas fired gen-sets available on the market. Check out Genrac, Onan and Coleman.

W6VPS
02-11-2008, 03:06 AM
Chris:
Good advice....buy the Honda you won't regret it. However, if it is do-able consider a small Onan generator from a wrecked RV. The beauty of these type Onans is that they are VERY quiet. Also, they run at a lower RPM as they use 4 poles in the genator rather than 2 as in the Honda. Therefore much quieter. But...you'll still not go wrong with a Honda.
Paul

K4KWH
02-11-2008, 04:11 AM
I am running a 4000 watt Coleman, and it has been adequate for my needs. I haven't run into the radio noise issues reported by others. I don't TRY to run the furnace as I have a Craft wood insert downstairs that will run you out of the house if you aren't careful (I've had to crack the garage door on occasion), nor do I try to cook on the electric stove. The insert has a flat surface extending out from the fireplace and generates PLENTY of heat for cooking. By starting the furnace fan, the insert will pull warm air upstairs. Lights, TV, radios, heat--no problemo. Only drawback is the noise from the engine itself, so I try to place it out under the carport on the opposite side of the house. I've thought of trying to experiment with some sort of compact car muffler to tone it down.

I don't get a LOT of use out of the genny, but it is nice to know it is there IF.......! We had a bad ice storm in 2001 and 2004 that knocked off power for days, so it came in handy. AND I still got to play on the radio. I cooked up a big "pie" of corn bread and beanie weenies on the wood stove and BOY! ;) Was that ever yummy off that wood stove! There's something different about woodstove cooking!

I can't run EVERYTHING on the Coleman at once, but, then I don't NEED to: it is adequate and keeps the house essentials running. The freezer, TV, and lights and fridge are quite nicely taken care of. I paid $250 for it used.


73

J

N2RJ
02-11-2008, 04:30 AM
We want to get a 20kW propane standby gen for the house.

For portable use we'll get an EU2000.

To each his own of course, but we want to be able to run the whole house, and that includes a well and 4 ton A/C.

K9KJM
02-11-2008, 10:38 AM
The FIRST thing that needs to be calculated is the load you want to power.
IF you live out in the country and have a 240 volt well pump, You NEED a 240 volt generator to be able to run your well pump.
(I have an older 5KW Kohler that works well for me. Runs the entire household AS LONG as a person does not try to run all heavy demand things at once.)
IF you live in a city and do not need 240 volts for a well pump, Around 2KW might be enough to run your furnace, etc at only 120 volts.
The best "deal" I have seen on generators was the 5KW Coleman a few years ago when they were closing them out several years after the "Y2K" non event at around 399 dollars each.
Yes, The Honda is a good unit. Are they worth it? I doubt it. Remember, The odds of actually needing a generator more than a few days per year are pretty slim. I would rather take the 500 or so dollar savings and buy another radio.

W1JL
02-11-2008, 01:10 PM
Consider getting a generator which is fueled by something other than gasoline. Unleaded gasoline gets old rather quickly and a unit like agenerator ought to be stored without any fuel in the tank, fuel line or carbuerator bowl.

If a liquid fuel is a must, consider a generator fueled by diesel, however if you happen to live in an area where natural gas is available, there are a number of good natural gas and LP gas fired gen-sets available on the market. Check out Genrac, Onan and Coleman.

Your suggestion makes several good points. However, unless you expect to make the generator a permanent installation (and maybe not even then), I would stick with easily portable, readily available liquid fuels.

They can be treated inexpensively for long-term storage which solves most of the problems with leaving fuel in the engine. Plus you can move it [more] easily to the other side of the house for construction projects, or across town to help out the folks in a power outage, or on an expedition for charging batteries.

While portable, or in an emergency, you'll find sources of liquid fuel much more available. In the worst case scenario, you can always siphon a few gallons out of your vehicle's fuel tank.

Josh, K1XLG.

KA0SOG
02-11-2008, 04:06 PM
However, unless you expect to make the generator a permanent installation (and maybe not even then), I would stick with easily portable, readily available liquid fuels.

Josh, K1XLG.

I work for a heating and cooling company here in Kansas City. We install Generac as back-up systems that are interfaced with the panel box through a proper transfer switch. That way when the power company comes buy to rehang your line you don't send power out the inbound and fry the guy. It is in fact building code.

The Generacs we install are whole house generators for residential and light commercial use. They run off either propane or natural gas. (To avoid the problem with liquid fuels especially gas going bad before you need it.)

One other thing to do when you consider sizing your generator is to consider what momma and the kids might be expecting to run. If she wants to use her hair dryer and watch TV be sure to calculate that into the equation before you spend the cash on a generator by letting price not peak demand drive your decisions.

Lastly, you might want to consider un-hard wiring your forced air natural gas or lp furnace from the panel box and drop a regular duplex in its place. Then put a conventional plug-in pigtail on your furnace. When the power goes just plug in the furnace to your generator with an extension cord and bingo you have a working furnace even with the power out in your house.

By the way did I mention to run the generator outside of the house? Every year some moron kills his family with carbon monoxide poisoning by running the generator in the garage and asphixiating the family.

W7KKK
02-11-2008, 04:12 PM
You don't say what the primary use is, but if it's for HF rigs the Honda EU-2000 only does just over 13 amps. I have had them and they are great little light weight gensets.
Just an idea, many RV types like me parallel two of these little gensets for both economy and weight to get double the output.
Two of these are easier for most to move around and you only have to use one saving fuel when you don't need the output capabilities of the two of them.
You can make your own parallel cables and save yourself a lot of money too.

N2RJ
02-11-2008, 04:53 PM
Your suggestion makes several good points. However, unless you expect to make the generator a permanent installation (and maybe not even then), I would stick with easily portable, readily available liquid fuels.

They can be treated inexpensively for long-term storage which solves most of the problems with leaving fuel in the engine. Plus you can move it [more] easily to the other side of the house for construction projects, or across town to help out the folks in a power outage, or on an expedition for charging batteries.

While portable, or in an emergency, you'll find sources of liquid fuel much more available. In the worst case scenario, you can always siphon a few gallons out of your vehicle's fuel tank.

Josh, K1XLG.

Not so fast.

Portable generators can be fitted with conversion kits that run off a BBQ tank. Someone here even posted a link.

As for liquid fuel being available in an emergency - not when there are lines at the gas station miles long with people filling up their cars.

K5PHW
02-11-2008, 11:20 PM
One thing to be wary of. Conversion of engines EPA certified on gasoline to
propane or natural gas can be an issue. Be sure what you are doing won't
cause problems with the feds. ;)


73 Clyde

WA2ZDY
02-11-2008, 11:48 PM
Yeah, I figured there'd be a complication converting some of these things to propane. There is no natural gas service into our community. Propane would be nice but . . .

As for the calculating the load, this is more for "dire emergency, a storm knocked power out for a week, do what you can" use. Absolute necessities are a few lights, fans and the TV and satellite receiver. The Honda 2000 will do that with ease. But if I can get more power for not much more money, that would be great. Running the fridge a few hours a day would be nice. Other stuff, like the ham rig, if needed, could be used when other things aren't.

Clyde had mentioned Generac and there's a 4000/6600w surge Generac with oil pressure shut down, the idle control, etc, for about $1000. If that's a good one, 4kw beats 1.6kw for nearly the same cash. I also saw a Black Max at 7kw for $982. Never heard of Black Max but it uses a Honda engine, so maybe . . .

This is why I came to you guys. I want as much power, balanced with reliability, as I can get for about a grand. The Honda 2000 will do what I NEED, if I can get more, why not?

K5PHW
02-12-2008, 12:04 AM
Howdy Chris! I got here before I read my email. Must be a ham thing.
The Generac with a Briggs is a very good value. Plus, always buy more power than
you think you will need. Because you will eventually find that need.

The low oil feature is a good one. I will only add that there are two basic versions
of that. One shuts the engine down when the oil level is approximately 20% low.
The other will not allow start up when low. Be clear on what you are getting.
Also a lot of the engine manufacturers will be less than helpful if you run it out of oil.
The standard line is, even though it has low oil shutdown, should that system fail
you may not be covered without a fight. Best thing to do is ALWAYS check the oil
level when refueling.

I hope this helps in your decision. I will be happy to answer any questions.


73 Clyde

W6TMI
02-12-2008, 12:53 AM
I got a good deal on a Kipor 2000, basically a Honda clone, I've only used it for a couple hours in a <cough> "emergency" (forgot to pay the power bill). It does have the auto idle thing so if there's not much power being used it is a little quieter and uses less gas.

Someone over at eham thought wll of it:
http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/6375

In general other reviews are favorable, at about 300$ less then the honda.

KA0GKT
02-12-2008, 02:10 AM
Honda makes a propane conversion (or used to) for some of their larger portable generators. I had just such a generator at the studio site for an AM/FM combo in Omaha a few years (over a decade :o) back. It was a manual start/ manual transfer switch arrangment, but it kept the station on-the-air and never missed a start.

At yet another station, we had a Winco (yeah, really old) generator which was propane fired. At both locations, we had two or three 250# propane tanks. The winco was on an automatic start/transfer switch and could keep the little 1KW AM on 1340 on the air quite nicely. Inside both stations, we had two breaker boxes, one for the essentials and one for everything else. Basically, only those things which were necessary for station operations was on the generator.

At home, I have an essentials panel which supplies the Fridge, Freezer, HVAC, one TV and several other things like the internet. The only lighting instruments operated by the generator are the bathroom lights (and the light inside the stove and the Microwave oven. We have a Gas range and the oven light is on the same plug as the ignitor.

Our generator is fueled by Natural Gas and is quiet enough that the neighbors don't know it is running...except that our AC is running and they're in the desert heat or living in a motel outside of the black-out area.

I put my generator in a few years back after a fire downed several power lines in central Arizona and made electricity very dear indeed in the Old Pueblo. Considering the cost of moving into a Motel (which may or may-not remain on-the-grid) The generator was a good investment.

K8PG
02-12-2008, 02:38 AM
I have a Generac 25 KW generator-diesel-and will run the whole house for 10
days on 120 gallons-never a problem-push the button away she goes,it was
installed by a Pro-$ 7,500.00 going on 8 yrs nw,Get the best you can afford
or you may be sorry.GL

Paul - K8PG CW IS !!!

AI4IJ
02-12-2008, 03:40 AM
I want as much power, balanced with reliability, as I can get for about a grand. The Honda 2000 will do what I NEED, if I can get more, why not?

Because, you said your application is for dire emergencies. In a dire emergency, fuel is going to be a bigger issue than how many appliances you can run at one time.

The smaller inverter style generators, like the Honda EU-2000 and the McCulloch FG-2000 tc that I mentioned are quiet, reliable, and fuel efficient. Unlike standard generators, the inverter generators do not need to operate at a constant 3600 rpm. If you can get by with less power, you can run for a longer period of time - a lot longer.

One reason I chose the smaller inverter generator was that I felt like I would get more use out of it in the long run. At under 50 pounds, I can take it virtually anywhere. And, with it being so quiet, I can use it virtually anywhere, too.

And, I figured that, in an emergency, the rough equivalent of one circuit in my house would be enough to get by.

For emergency heat, in the winter, I have a fire place and catalytic propane space heaters suitable for use indoors. For cooking, I have propane camp stoves and the gas grill on the porch. For light, I have rechargeable LED table lamps, tap lights, and flashlights - all of which can run for days on a single set of AA or AAA NiMh batteries. I have 250 AH of AGM batteries and a 1200 watt inverter that I can use to run small loads, like amateur radios, laptop, and/or small LCD TV, etc. between running the generator. So, running the refrigerator a few hours a day, the microwave or toaster oven at mealtimes, and battery charging are about all I need. And, 1.6KW will handle that nicely.

And, I figure about 12 gallons of fuel will do the trick for a week. Try that with a 5kw generator.

73
Richard
AI4IJ

W0BKR
02-12-2008, 12:23 PM
Man, you got took. Paid less then 1/2 of that for same size.


I have a Generac 25 KW generator-diesel-and will run the whole house for 10
days on 120 gallons-never a problem-push the button away she goes,it was
installed by a Pro-$ 7,500.00 going on 8 yrs nw,Get the best you can afford
or you may be sorry.GL

Paul - K8PG CW IS !!!

WS2L
02-12-2008, 01:37 PM
Chris,

Since you plan on staying in FL you would be very wise to buy a generator. When I lived in FL Hurricane Wilma hit us as a category 5 in Pompano Beach. When the storm was gone we had no water or power for a week, of course others were much less fortunate than us. Despite that the Publix was open the next day and we bought stuff that didn't require water or electricity to warm and God do I hate SPAM after that incident. There were a few people in our complex who had generators but most did not. Buy one and at the first word of a storm coming your way pull that puppy out and run it for a bit and buy a crap load of gas. During Wilma the lines to some gas stations were 4 miles long and the first few days you could only get $20 of gas.

WA2ZDY
02-12-2008, 04:36 PM
So much info here and I thank everyone.

Dave, I couldn't leave here even if I wanted to and right now I'd LOVE to go home. But houses similar to mine are sitting right now priced at $50k less than I paid last April. Oh well.

As for cooking, we have the big propane grill. And the kids and I can live on peanut butter quite happily.

AI4IJ makes a lot of valid points and the Honda is the only generator that has gotten 100% positive reports. That's probably how I'll go.

This community has quite a few whole house auto-start systems. When I'm home alone on a weekday that the power fails, I can hear them all cranking up. When folks are home and it stays out a bit, more portables get fired up. So there's no doubt a generator is a necessity here. Especially since I am afraid of the dark! (I bet I have more battery operated lights than anyone here, including battery operated emergency lights as found in stores!)

Anyway, I'm still open to input! Thanks.