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KC0W
06-10-2007, 01:37 AM
Hello all,

I just purchased a Butternut HF6V HF vertical antenna to be used as a backup antenna later this fall from a DX location with lots of saltwater nearby.

I have noticed over the years that Butternut sells a 160 meter kit to resonate the HF6V on top band. All in all, not very efficient. And having a GOOD signal on 160 is asking too much from an antenna that is only 28' tall, even with this 160 meter kit.

So Here is what I came up with:

Run a 125' - 150' horizontal wire from the top of the antenna to a distant support structure. Shorten the wire as needed to resonate the Butternut on 160 meters. Simple enough, right?

Now for the million dollar question:

Lowering the antenna & adding the horizontal wire every time I wanted to work 160 would not be very efficient & quite hard on the antenna. So..........How do I add this wire (connected with a hose clamp I would assume) to the top of the 28' antenna WITHOUT lowering the antenna?

I do not want to go the tilt over base route. Sooner or later there will be problems with the antenna by tilting the base over numerous times..........I even thought about some kind of relay on the top of the antenna in order to switch the wire in/out of the antenna. A relay would need a control voltage wire running up the antenna & would severally alter the antennas SWR.

Thought about a long stick & hooking the wire to the top of the antenna. This might be my only real option. Talk about trying to thread a needle as I attempt to secure this wire from the ground 28' below to the top of the antenna.

Climbing a ladder is out of the question.........Does anyone have any ideas?



Thanks,


Tom kcw

K8JD
06-10-2007, 02:18 AM
Any size of wire attached to the top of the vertical will cause a sideways strain on the antenna and may even bend the tubing and deform the antenna permanently.
You could break the antenna at the point where one of the resonator assemlblies attach and damage the #coils and capacitors.
Sounds like a good idea electrically but mechanically, a nightmare. http://www.qrz.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif

K8JD
06-10-2007, 02:20 AM
PS: I have been using my HF6v for 10 years and would not do anything to wreck this fine antenna!

W0UZR
06-10-2007, 03:23 AM
Quote[/b] (k8jd @ June 09 2007,20:18)]Any size of wire attached to the top of the vertical will cause a sideways strain on the antenna and may even bend the tubing and deform the antenna permanently.
You could break the antenna at the point where one of the resonator assemlblies attach and damage the #coils and capacitors.
Sounds like a good idea electrically but mechanically, a nightmare. http://www.qrz.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif
You beat me to it!

VK2TIL
06-10-2007, 05:47 AM
If you really truly want to do this, perhaps you could put a trap at the top and run three wires/guys down to near the ground; sortof like an umbrella.

KA5PIU
06-10-2007, 05:57 AM
Hello.

Why not just load the wire you intend to use on 160 meters and be done with it?
A quarter wave dipole is around 250 foot long.
Mine works quite well and was super easy to put together.
The most expensive part was the BalUn.
Perhaps next time I will build that as well.

K8JD
06-10-2007, 09:26 PM
A quarter wave dipole?http://www.qrz.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/rock.gif Do your math, A halfwave dipole is 250 ft for 160M. a Quarter wave dipole (not a good idea to start with) used on 160 would actually be a 80 M halfwave dipole antenna.
An alternative type of antenna could be an end fed quarterwave wire in the inverted L shape fed at the BASE of the other vertical and run up at an angle sloping away from it. the ideal situation is having a tree nearby to support the wire. Should be a fair match for 50 ohm coax feed. A shortened version of this would have a loading coil somewhere in the run of wire and could be adjusted to compensate for the shortened length of wire.

NN4RH
06-10-2007, 09:54 PM
Quote[/b] ]An alternative type of antenna could be an end fed quarterwave wire in the inverted L shape fed at the BASE of the other vertical and run up at an angle sloping away from it. the ideal situation is having a tree nearby to support the wire. Should be a fair match for 50 ohm coax feed.

Yes. I've done that actually. I had a Hustler 6BTV and ran an inverted L for 160m from the same feedpoint. The vertical part of L off at probably a 20 degree angle from vertical, going to the closest tree. The tuning of the 6BTV was affected a little but not enough to bother readjusting it. It was just a temporary setup for the 160m contest one year, and I took it down a few weeks later, but there's no reason it could not have stayed up.

K9STH
06-10-2007, 09:55 PM
My HyGain HyTower wouldn't work very well on 160 meters using the loading coil that was designed to get it to work. During the week I could get like a 539 running 100 watts CW output but on weekends and during contests "forget it"!

Then I put a wire about 130 feet long connected to the base of the vertical. I spaced the wire about 6 inches from the "tower" section of the antenna then came off of the vertical at the 24 foot height (the top of the actual tower section). The wire runs in several directions but is resonant on 160 meters. Since my 160 meter SSB/CW transmitter is tube-type with a wide range pi-network output I don't need any type of tuner to cover the entire 1.8 MHz to 2.0 MHz range. Using this wire in parallel with the HyTower I have gone from not being heard on 160 meters during contests to actually "busting" some pileups and my present transmitter only puts out 80 watts peak power!

Basically what adding the wire did was to make a "parallel" antenna for 160 meters which is fed from the same feedline as the HyTower. It works very well and was very cheap to do.

Glen, K9STH

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